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Jan Długosz
Jan Długosz
Jan Długosz
(Polish pronunciation: [ˈjan ˈdwuɡɔʂ]; 1 December 1415 – 19 May 1480), also known as Ioannes, Joannes, or Johannes Longinus or Dlugossius, was a Polish priest, chronicler, diplomat, soldier, and secretary to Bishop Zbigniew Oleśnicki of Kraków. He is considered Poland's first historian.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 See also 4 Notes 5 Sources 6 External linksLife[edit]Jan Długosz Jan Długosz
Jan Długosz
is best known for his Annales seu cronici incliti regni Poloniae (Annals or Chronicles of the Famous Kingdom of Poland), covering events in southeastern Europe, but also in Western Europe, from 965 to 1480, the year he died.[2] His work was first printed in 1701-1703. Whenever he bothers to mention himself in the book, he writes of himself in the third person. He belonged to the Wieniawa coat-of-arms. Długosz was a canon at Kraków,[1] educated in the University of Krakow
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Grzegorz Z Sanoka
Gregory of Sanok
Sanok
(Polish: Grzegorz z Sanoka; Sanok, 1403 or 1407 – 29 January 1477, Rohatyn) was a Polish bishop, a professor at the Kraków Academy, metropolitan archbishop of Lwów, scholar, philosopher, and a major figure of Polish Humanism. Life[edit] He left home at age twelve and for the next ten years traveled across Europe, including Germany, where he learned the language.[1] After his prolonged studies abroad, in 1421 he returned and initially studied at Kraków Academy, serving as choirmaster. He graduated in 1433, was appointed tutor to the children of Jan Tarnowski, and journeyed with the family to Italy. He came to the attention of Pope Eugenius IV
Eugenius IV
and studied in Florence. After returning to Poland in 1439 he was a professor of Graeco-Roman poetry and Italian literature at the Kraków Academy. He became Archbishop of Lwów in 1451 and a pioneer of Polish Humanism
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Roman Catholic Archdiocese Of Prague
The Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of Prague
Prague
(Praha) (Czech: Arcidiecéze pražská, Latin: Archidioecesis Pragensis) is a Metropolitan Catholic archdiocese of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
in Bohemia, in the Czech Republic. The cathedral archiepiscopal see is St. Vitus Cathedral, in the Bohemian and Czech capital Prague, entirely situated inside the Prague Castle complex. Msgr Dominik Duka, O.P
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Wrocław
Wrocław
Wrocław
(/ˈvrɔːtslɑːf/;[2] Polish: [ˈvrɔt͡swaf] ( listen); German: Breslau, pronounced [ˈbʁɛslaʊ̯]; Czech: Vratislav; Latin: Vratislavia) is the largest city in western Poland. It lies on the banks of the River Oder
Oder
in the Silesian Lowlands
Silesian Lowlands
of Central Europe, roughly 350 kilometres (220 mi) from the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
to the north and 40 kilometres (25 mi) from the Sudeten Mountains to the south. The population of Wrocław
Wrocław
in 2017 was 638,364, making it the fourth-largest city in Poland
Poland
and the main city of Wrocław agglomeration. Wrocław
Wrocław
is the historical capital of Silesia
Silesia
and Lower Silesia. Today, it is the capital of the Lower Silesian Voivodeship
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Bytom
Bytom
Bytom
(Polish pronunciation: [ˈbɨtɔm] ( listen); Silesian: Bytůń, German: Beuthen O.S.) is a city in Silesia
Silesia
in southern Poland, near Katowice. It lies in the central-western district of the Upper Silesian Metropolitan Union
Upper Silesian Metropolitan Union
– a metropolis with a population of 2 million. Bytom
Bytom
is located in the Silesian Highlands, on the Bytomka river (tributary of the Kłodnica). The city has belonged to the Silesian Voivodeship
Silesian Voivodeship
since its formation in 1999. Previously it was in Katowice
Katowice
Voivodeship
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George Of Podebrady
George of Kunštát
Kunštát
and Poděbrady
Poděbrady
(23 April 1420 – 22 March 1471), also known as Poděbrad or Podiebrad (Czech: Jiří z Poděbrad; German: Georg von Podiebrad), was King of Bohemia
King of Bohemia
(1458–1471). He was leader of the Hussites. He is known for his idea and attempt to establish common European institutions. It is seen as the first historical vision of European unity.Contents1 Early life 2 Ruler of Bohemia 3 The message of peace 4 Marriages and children 5 Ancestors 6 See also 7 References 8 FootnotesEarly life[edit] Jiří was the son of Victor of Munsterberg, a Bohemian nobleman, one of the leaders of the Utraquists, the more moderate faction of the Hussites
Hussites
during the Hussite
Hussite
Wars
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Jan Jiskra Of Brandýs
Jan Jiskra z Brandýsa (German: Johann Giskra von Brandeis; Hungarian: Jiskra János; c. 1400 – c. 1469), in English sometimes referred as John Giskra, was a Czech strategist and mercenary soldier. Jan Jiskra came from the Moravian branch of the noble family Páni z Brandýsa (Lords of Brandýs), he was possibly a son of Alšík z Brandýsa. Jiskra spent his youth in Bohemia
Bohemia
and partially also in Italy, where he – according to several sources – attended the battles of the Republic of Venice. In the Czech lands he became familiar with Hussite war strategies
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Bohemia
Coordinates: 50°N 15°E / 50°N 15°E / 50; 15This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Grunwald, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship
Grunwald [ˈɡrunvalt] (German: Grünfelde, green field; Lithuanian: Žalgiris) is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Grunwald, within Ostróda
Ostróda
County, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, in northern Poland.[1] It lies approximately 26 kilometres (16 mi) south of Ostróda
Ostróda
and 43 km (27 mi) south-west of the regional capital Olsztyn. The village has a population of 800. After the Battle of Grunwald
Battle of Grunwald
(also known as Battle of Tannenberg (1410)), the King of Poland, Jogaila, intended to erect a chapel on the battlefield near Grünfelde[2] at "loco conflictus nostri ... dicto Grunenvelt". As he did win the battle, but not the war, the battle site remained under the control of the Teutonic Order, and they built a chapel dedicated to Mary instead
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Silesia
Silesia
Silesia
(/sɪˈliːʒə-/;[1] Polish: Śląsk [ɕlɔ̃sk]; Czech: Slezsko; German:  Schlesien (help·info) German pronunciation: [ˈʃleːzi̯ən]; Silesian German: Schläsing; Silesian: Ślůnsk [ɕlonsk]; Lower Sorbian: Šlazyńska; Upper Sorbian: Šleska; Latin: Silesia) is a region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
and Germany. Its area is about 40,000 km2 (15,444 sq mi), and its population about 8,000,000. Silesia
Silesia
is located along the Oder River. It consists of Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
and Upper Silesia. The region is rich in mineral and natural resources, and includes several important industrial areas. Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wrocław
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Opole
Opole
Opole
[ɔˈpɔlɛ] ( listen) (German: Oppeln, Silesian German: Uppeln, Silesian: Uopole, Czech: Opolí) is a city located in southern Poland
Poland
on the Oder River
Oder River
(Odra). With a population of approximately 127,792 (January 2017), it is the capital of the Opole Voivodeship and, also the seat of Opole
Opole
County. With it long history dating back to the 9th century, Opole
Opole
is considered to be one of the oldest towns in Poland. The origins of the first settlement are connected with the town being granted Magdeburg Rights in 1217 by Casimir I of Opole,[1] the great-grandson of Polish Duke Bolesław III Wrymouth
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Middle High German
Middle High German
High German
(abbreviated MHG, German: Mittelhochdeutsch, abbr. Mhd.) is the term for the form of German spoken in the High Middle Ages. It is conventionally dated between 1050 and 1350, developing from Old High German
Old High German
and into Early New High German. High German
High German
is defined as those varieties of German which were affected by the Second Sound Shift; the Middle Low German
Middle Low German
and Middle Dutch languages spoken to the North and North West, which did not participate in this sound change, are not part of MHG. While there is no standard MHG, the prestige of the Hohenstaufen
Hohenstaufen
court gave rise in the late 12th century to a supra-regional literary language (mittelhochdeutsche Dichtersprache) based on Swabian, an Alemannic dialect
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Holy Roman Emperor
The Holy Roman Emperor
Emperor
(historically Romanorum Imperator " Emperor
Emperor
of the Romans") was the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
(800-1806 CE, from Charlemagne
Charlemagne
to Francis II). The title was almost without interruption held in conjunction with the rule of the Kingdom of Germany.[1][2][3] From an autocracy in Carolingian
Carolingian
times the title evolved into an elected monarchy chosen by the prince-electors. The Holy Roman Emperor was widely perceived to rule by divine right by Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
rulers in Europe, and he often contradicted or rivaled the Pope, most notably during the Investiture controversy. In theory, the Holy Roman Emperor was primus inter pares (first among equals) among other Catholic monarchs
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Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
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Pope Sixtus IV
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
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