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James Tait Black Memorial Prize
The James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are literary prizes awarded for literature written in the English language. They, along with the Hawthornden Prize, are Britain's oldest literary awards.[1] Based at the University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
in Scotland, United Kingdom, the prizes were founded in 1919 by Mrs Janet Coats Black in memory of her late husband,[2] James Tait Black, a partner in the publishing house of A & C Black Ltd.[3] Prizes are awarded in three categories: Fiction, Biography
Biography
and Drama.Contents1 History 2 Selection process and prize administration 3 Eligibility 4 List of recipients 5 Best of the James Tait Black (2012) 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] From inception, the James Tait Black prize was organised without overt publicity. There was a lack of press and publisher attention, initially at least, because Edinburgh was distant from the literary centres of the country
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Literary Prize
A literary award is an award presented in recognition of a particularly lauded literary piece or body of work. It is normally presented to an author.Contents1 Organizations 2 Types of awards 3 Criticism 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrganizations[edit] Most literary awards come with a corresponding award ceremony. Many awards are structured with one organization (usually a non-profit organization) as the presenter and public face of the award, and another organization as the financial sponsor or backer, who pays the prize remuneration and the cost of the ceremony and public relations, typically a corporate sponsor who may sometimes attach their name to the award (such as the Orange Prize). Types of awards[edit] There are awards for several forms of writing such as poetry and novels. Many awards are also dedicated to a certain genre of fiction or non-fiction writing (such as science fiction or politics)
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Isabelle De Charrière
Charrière may refer to: People: Henri Charrière
Henri Charrière
(1906–1973), French murderer and author Isabelle de Charrière (1740–1805), Dutch-Swiss writer
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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764 – 17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
from November 1830 to July 1834. A member of the Whig Party, he was a long-time leader of multiple reform movements, most famously the Reform Act 1832. His government also saw the abolition of slavery in the British Empire, in which the government purchased slaves from their owners in 1833. Grey was a strong opponent of the foreign and domestic policies of William Pitt the Younger in the 1790s. In 1807, he resigned as foreign secretary to protest the King's uncompromising rejection of Catholic Emancipation. Grey finally resigned in 1834 over disagreements in his cabinet regarding Ireland, and retired from politics. His biographer George Macaulay Trevelyan argues:in our domestic history 1832 is the next great landmark after 1688 ..
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Hawthornden Prize
The Hawthornden Prize is a British literary award that was established in 1919 by Alice Warrender.[1] It is funded by a trust established by her.[2] Authors under the age of 41[3] are awarded on the quality of their "imaginative literature" which can be written in either poetry or prose.[4] The Hawthornden Committee awards the Prize annually for a work published in the previous twelve months. There have been several gap years without a recipient (1984–87, 1971–73, 1966, 1959, 1945–57).[5] Unlike other major literary awards, the Hawthornden does not solicit submissions
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Samuel Butler (1835–1902)
Samuel Butler (4 December 1835 – 18 June 1902) was the iconoclastic English author of the Utopian
Utopian
satirical novel Erewhon
Erewhon
(1872) and the semi-autobiographical Bildungsroman The Way of All Flesh, published posthumously in 1903. Both have remained in print ever since. In other studies he examined Christian orthodoxy, evolutionary thought, and Italian art, and made prose translations of the Iliad
Iliad
and Odyssey
Odyssey
that are still consulted today
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Earl Of Airlie
Earl of Airlie
Earl of Airlie
is a title in the Peerage of Scotland, created on 2 April 1639 for James Ogilvy, 7th Lord Ogilvy of Airlie, along with the title Lord Ogilvy of Alith and Lintrathen. The title Lord Ogilvy of Airlie had been created on 28 April 1491. In 1715, James Ogilvy, son of the 3rd Earl, took part in a Jacobite uprising against the Crown, and was therefore punished by being attainted; consequently, at his father's death two years later, he was unable to inherit the title. He was, however, pardoned in 1725. At his death, his brother John was recognised as the Earl, but John's son David was also attainted, but later pardoned. Then, a cousin, also named David Ogilvy, claimed the title, suggesting that the previous attainders did not affect its succession, but the House of Lords rejected his claim. Parliament later passed an Act completely reversing the attainders; therefore, David Ogilvy was allowed to assume the title
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James Naughtie
Alexander James "Jim" Naughtie FRSE (surname pronounced /ˈnɔːxti/; born 9 August 1951) is a British radio and news presenter for the BBC. From 1994 until 2015 he was one of the main presenters of Radio 4's Today programme. In July 2015 he announced, via the BBC, that in early 2016 he would retire from regular presenting duties on the programme and would, instead, be its ' Special
Special
Correspondent' with 'responsibility for charting the course of the constitutional changes at the heart of the UK political debate', as well as the
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Biography
A biography, or simply bio, is a detailed description of a person's life. It involves more than just the basic facts like education, work, relationships, and death; it portrays a person's experience of these life events. Unlike a profile or curriculum vitae (résumé), a biography presents a subject's life story, highlighting various aspects of his or her life, including intimate details of experience, and may include an analysis of the subject's personality. Biographical works are usually non-fiction, but fiction can also be used to portray a person's life. One in-depth form of biographical coverage is called legacy writing. Works in diverse media, from literature to film, form the genre known as biography. An authorized biography is written with the permission, cooperation, and at times, participation of a subject or a subject's heirs
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Fiction
Fiction
Fiction
is a story or setting that is derived from imagination—in other words, not based strictly on history or fact.[1][2][3] Fiction can be expressed in a variety of formats, including writings, live performances, films, television programs, animations, video games, and role-playing games, though the term originally and most commonly refers to the narrative forms of literature (see literary fiction),[4] including novels, novellas, short stories, and plays. Fiction
Fiction
is occasionally used in its narrowest sense to mean simply any "literary narrative".[5] A work of fiction is an act of creative imagination, so its total faithfulness to the real-world is not typically assumed by its audience.[6] Therefore, fiction is not commonly expected to present only characters who are actual people or descriptions that are factually accurate
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Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine
The Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
in Physiology
Physiology
or Medicine
Medicine
(Swedish: Nobelpriset i fysiologi eller medicin), administered by the Nobel Foundation, is awarded once a year for outstanding discoveries in the fields of life sciences and medicine. It is one of five Nobel Prizes established in 1895 by Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, in his will. Nobel was personally interested in experimental physiology and wanted to establish a prize for progress through scientific discoveries in laboratories. The Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
is presented to the recipient(s) at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death, along with a diploma and a certificate for the monetary award. The front side of the medal provides the same profile of Alfred Nobel as depicted on the medals for Physics, Chemistry, and Literature; its reverse side is unique to this medal
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Drama
Drama
Drama
is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance; a play performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.[1] Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.[2] The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia, and Melpomene
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Regius Chair Of Rhetoric And Belles Lettres
The Regius Chair of Rhetoric and English Literature
Regius Chair of Rhetoric and English Literature
at the University of Edinburgh was established in 1762 (as the Regius Chair of Rhetoric and Belles Lettres). It is arguably the first professorship of English Literature established anywhere in the world. Its first holder was Professor Hugh Blair. Recent holders have included Professors Alistair Fowler, Ian Donaldson, John Frow, and Laura Marcus. The Current holder is Greg Walker. List of Regius Professors of Rhetoric and English Literature[edit] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.Laura Marcus (? to 2009)[1] Greg Walker (2010 to present); incumbent[2] "2010 Appointments - Regius Chair". University of Edinburgh
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John Wyclif
John Wycliffe
John Wycliffe
(/ˈwɪklɪf/; also spelled Wyclif, Wycliff, Wiclef, Wicliffe, Wickliffe; 1320s – 31 December 1384)[2] was an English scholastic philosopher, theologian, Biblical translator, reformer, and seminary professor at the University of Oxford. He was an influential dissident within the Roman Catholic priesthood during the 14th century and is considered an important predecessor to Protestantism. Wycliffe attacked the privileged status of the clergy, which was central to their powerful role in England. He then attacked the luxury and pomp of local parishes and their ceremonies.[3] Wycliffe was also an advocate for translation of the Bible into the vernacular. He completed a translation directly from the Vulgate
Vulgate
into Middle English
Middle English
in the year 1382, now known as Wycliffe's Bible
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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