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James Henare
Sir James Clendon Tau Henare, KBE, DSO (18 November 1911 – 2 April 1989) was a New Zealand tribal leader, military officer, farmer and community leader. He fought for four years with the Māori Battalion during World War II, was wounded at El Alamein, and with the rank of lieutenant colonel was the battalion's commanding officer when the war ended.[1] He stood for Parliament for the National Party in the Northern Maori electorate on several occasions: 1946, 1949, 1951, 1963, and the 1963 by-election.[2][3][4] Of Māori descent, he identified with the Ngāpuhi
Ngāpuhi
iwi. He was born in Motatau, Northland, the son of Taurekareka Henare.[2] He was educated at Sacred Heart College, Auckland
Sacred Heart College, Auckland
and at Massey Agricultural College. Tau Henare, a member of Parliament between 1993 and 2014, is his great-nephew
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Knight Commander Of The Most Excellent Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Motatau
Motatau is a locality in the Northland Region of the North Island of New Zealand. Maromaku is to the east. The Taikirau Stream flows from east through Motatau and then runs northwest to join the Waiharakeke Stream.[1][2] The name means "to speak to oneself" in Māori.[3] Education[edit] Motatau School is a decile 3 coeducational primary school serving years 1-8. It has a roll of 28.[4] References[edit]^ Peter Dowling (editor) (2004). Reed New Zealand Atlas. Reed Books. pp. map 5. ISBN 0-7900-0952-8. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Roger Smith, GeographX (2005). The Geographic Atlas of New Zealand. Robbie Burton. pp. maps 24. ISBN 1-877333-20-4.  ^ "Te Arawa explorers". Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand.  ^ "Te Kete Ipurangi". Ministry of Education. This Northland Region-related geography article is a stub
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The Northern Advocate
The Northern Advocate
The Northern Advocate
is the regional daily paper for the city of Whangarei
Whangarei
and the Northland Region
Northland Region
in New Zealand.Contents1 History 2 Other publications2.1 The Whangarei
Whangarei
Report 2.2 The Northland Age3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Whangarei
Whangarei
Comet and Northern Advertiser was founded in 1875 as a weekly paper by George Alderton and, despite a small population which led to predictions the paper "would go up like a comet, and come down like a stick",[3] the paper flourished and within two years had expanded to 12 pages and become the Northern Advocate and General Advertiser, with a small section printed in Maori.[3] The paper began daily publication in 1902
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National Library Of New Zealand
The National Library of New Zealand
New Zealand
(Māori: Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa) is New Zealand's legal deposit library charged with the obligation to "enrich the cultural and economic life of New Zealand and its interchanges with other nations" (National Library of New Zealand (Te Puna Mātauranga) Act 2003)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Barry Gustafson
Barry Selwyn Gustafson (born 1938) is a New Zealand political scientist and historian, and a leading political biographer. He served for nearly four decades as Professor of Political Studies at the University of Auckland, and as Acting Director of the New Zealand Asia Institute from 2004 to 2006. He has contested various general elections, first for the Labour Party and later for the National Party, coming second each time.Contents1 Early life 2 Politics and academia 3 Committee work 4 Works 5 Notes 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Barry Selwyn Gustafson was born in Auckland
Auckland
in 1938. He was educated at Auckland, Massey and Glasgow Universities (BA 1960, MA 1962, PhD 1974).[1] Politics and academia[edit] He was a member of the Labour Party from 1954 to 1981, and stood in two general elections as a candidate; in 1960 and in 1966. In 1960, he contested the "blue-ribbon" Remuera electorate and lost by 6109 votes to National's Ronald Algie
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Ministry For Culture And Heritage
Ministry may refer to:Contents1 Government 2 Religion 3 Music 4 Fiction 5 See alsoGovernment[edit] Ministry (collective executive), the complete body of government ministers under the leadership of a prime minister Ministry (government department), a department of a governmentReligion[edit]Christian ministry, activity by Christians to spread or express their faithMinister (Christianity), clergy authorized by a church or religious organization to perform teaching or rituals Ordination, the process by which individuals become clergy
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Dictionary Of New Zealand Biography
The Dictionary of New Zealand Biography
Biography
(DNZB) is an encyclopedia or biographical dictionary containing biographies of over 3,000 deceased New Zealanders. It was first published as a series of print volumes from 1990 to 2000, and then on a website from 2002. The dictionary superseded An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand of 1966, which had 900 biographies. The dictionary is managed by the Ministry for Culture and Heritage of the Government of New Zealand. An earlier work of the same name in two volumes, published in 1940 by Guy Scholefield with government assistance, is unrelated.Contents1 Overview 2 Representative entries2.1 Barbara Weldon 2.2 Jessie Finnie3 Accolades 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] Work on the current version of the DNZB was started in 1983 under the editorship of W. H. Oliver. The first volume covered the period 1769–1869 and was published in 1990
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New Zealand General Election, 2014
John Key NationalSubsequent Prime Minister John Key NationalThe 2014 New Zealand
New Zealand
general election took place on Saturday 20 September 2014 to determine the membership of the 51st New Zealand Parliament.[1] Voters elected 121 members to the House of Representatives, with 71 from single-member electorates (an increase from 70 in 2011)[2] and 49 from party lists. Since 1996, New Zealand
New Zealand
has used the Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) voting system, giving voters two votes: one for a political party and one for their local electorate MP. The party vote decides how many seats each party gets in the new Parliament; a party is entitled to a share of the seats if it receives 5% of the party vote or wins an electorate. Normally, the House has 120 seats but extra seats may be added where there is an overhang, caused by a party winning more electorates than seats it is entitled to
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Massey Agricultural College
Massey University (Māori: Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa) is a university based in Раlmеrstоn Nоrth, Nеw Zеаlаnd, with significant campuses in Аlbаny and Wellington. Massey University has approximately 35,000 students, 17,000 of whom are extramural or distance-learning students, making it New Zealand's second largest university when not counting international students.[2] Research is undertaken on all three campuses, and more than 3,000 international students from over 100 countries study at the university.[3] Massey University is the only university in New Zealand offering degrees in aviation, dispute resolution, veterinary medicine, and nanoscience. Massey's veterinary school is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association and is recognised in the United States, Australia, Canada, and Britain
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Distinguished Service Order
The Distinguished Service Order
Distinguished Service Order
(DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other parts of the Commonwealth of Nations, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat.Contents1 Creation 2 Modern era 3 Nomenclature 4 Description 5 Notable recipients 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCreation[edit] Instituted on 6 September 1886 by
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Northland Region
Ngāi Takoto, Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Kurī, Ngāti Wai, Te Aupōuri, Te Rarawa Te RoroaWebsite: http://www.nrc.govt.nzCities and townsCities: WhangareiTowns: Kaitaia, Kaeo, Kawakawa, Moerewa, Kaikohe, Ohaeawai, Okaihau, Kerikeri, Russell, Paihia, Waitangi, Mangonui, Taipa, Opononi, Omapere, Rawene, Kohukohu, Ruakaka, Waipu, Kaiwaka, Mangawhai, Dargaville, Ruawai, Maungaturoto, Paparoa, HikurangiConstituent territorial authoritiesNames: Far North District, Kaipara District, Whangarei DistrictA map showing population density in the Northland Region at the 2006 censusThe Northland Region[2] (Māori: Te Tai Tokerau) is the northernmost of New Zealand's 16 local government regions. New Zealanders often call it the Far North, or, because of its mild climate, the Winterless North
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Iwi
Iwi (Māori pronunciation: [ˈiwi]) are the largest social units in New Zealand
New Zealand
Māori society. The Māori language
Māori language
word iwi means "people" or "nation",[1] and is often translated as "tribe",[2] or a confederation of tribes. The word iwi is both singular and plural in Māori. Most Māori in pre-European times gave their primary allegiance to relatively small groups such as hapū ("sub-tribe")[3] and whānau ("family").[4] Iwi groups trace their ancestry to the original Polynesian migrants who, according to tradition, arrived from Hawaiki. Some iwi cluster into larger groupings based on genealogical tradition, known as waka (literally: "canoes", with reference to the original migration voyages), but these super-groupings generally serve symbolic rather than practical functions. Each iwi contains a number of hapū
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Māori People
A people is a plurality of persons considered as a whole, as is the case with an ethnic group or nation. Collectively, for example, the contemporary Frisians
Frisians
and Danes
Danes
are two related Germanic peoples, while various Middle Eastern ethnic groups are often linguistically categorized as Semitic peoples.Contents1 In politics 2 In law 3 See also 4 ReferencesIn politics Main article: Commoner Liberty Leading the People
Liberty Leading the People
by Eugène DelacroixVarious states govern, or claim to govern, in the name of the people. Both the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
used the Latin
Latin
term Senatus Populusque Romanus, (the Senate and People
People
of Rome)
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