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James Clarence Mangan
James Clarence Mangan, born James Mangan (Irish: Séamus Ó Mangáin; 1 May 1803, Dublin
Dublin
– 20 June 1849), was an Irish poet.Contents1 Early life 2 Literary career 3 Style 4 Reception and Legacy 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Mangan was the son of James Mangan, a former hedge school teacher and native of Shanagolden, Co. Limerick, and Catherine Smith from Kiltale, Co. Meath. After marrying Smith, James Mangan took over a grocery business in Dublin
Dublin
owned by the Smith family, eventually becoming bankrupt as a result. Mangan described his father as having "a princely soul but no prudence", and attributed his family's bankruptcy to his father's suspect business speculations and tendency to throw expensive parties
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
(1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, into a middle-class family on the way down
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St. Stephen's Green
St Stephen's Green
St Stephen's Green
(Irish: Faiche Stiabhna)[1] is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard. It was officially re-opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880 by Lord Ardilaun.[2][3] The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies as well as a stop on one of Dublin's Luas
Luas
tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22 acres (89,000 m2), it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares
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James Hardiman
James Hardiman (1782–1855), also known as Séamus Ó hArgadáin, was a librarian at Queen's College, Galway. The university library now bears his name. Hardiman is best remembered for his History of the Town and County of Galway (1820) and Irish Minstrelsy (1831), one of the first published collections of Irish poetry and songs.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Hardiman was born in Westport, County Mayo, in the west of Ireland around 1782. His father owned a small estate in County Mayo. He was trained as a lawyer and became sub-commissioner of public records in Dublin Castle. He was an active member of the Royal Irish Academy,[1] and collected and rescued many examples of Irish traditional music. In 1855, shortly after its foundation, Hardiman became librarian of Queen's College, Galway.[1] The university library was later named in his honour. Works[edit]The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
(/ˈkoʊləˌrɪdʒ/; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief
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Thomas De Quincey
Thomas Penson De Quincey (/ˈtɒməs də ˈkwɪnsi/;[1] 15 August 1785 – 8 December 1859) was an English essayist, best known for his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
(1821).[2][3] Many scholars suggest that in publishing this work De Quincey inaugurated the tradition of addiction literature in the West.[4]Contents1 Life and work1.1 Child and student 1.2 Journalist 1.3 Translator and essayist2 Financial pressures 3 Medical issues 4 Collected works 5 Influence 6 Major publications 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife and work[edit] Child and student[edit] De Quincey was born at 86 Cross Street, Manchester, Lancashire.[5] His father was a successful merchant with an interest in literature who died when he was quite young
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Literary Modernism
Literary modernism, or modernist literature, has its origins in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, mainly in Europe
Europe
and North America, and is characterized by a very self-conscious break with traditional ways of writing, in both poetry and prose fiction. Modernists experimented with literary form and expression, as exemplified by Ezra Pound's maxim to "Make it new."[1] This literary movement was driven by a conscious desire to overturn traditional modes of representation and express the new sensibilities of their time.[2] The horrors of the
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Postmodern Literature
Postmodern literature
Postmodern literature
is literature characterized by reliance on narrative techniques such as fragmentation, paradox, and the unreliable narrator; and often is (though not exclusively) defined as a style or a trend which emerged in the post– World War II
World War II
era. Postmodern works are seen as a response against dogmatic following of Enlightenment thinking and Modernist approaches to literature.[1] Postmodern literature, like postmodernism as a whole, tends to resist definition or classification as a "movement"
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Flann O'Brien
Brian O'Nolan
Brian O'Nolan
(Irish: Brian Ó Nualláin; 5 October 1911 – 1 April 1966) was an Irish novelist, playwright and satirist, considered a major figure in twentieth century Irish literature. Born in Strabane, County Tyrone, he is regarded as a key figure in postmodern literature.[1] His English language novels, such as At Swim-Two-Birds and The Third Policeman, were written under the pen name Flann O'Brien. His many satirical columns in The Irish Times
The Irish Times
and an Irish language novel An Béal Bocht
An Béal Bocht
were written under the name Myles na gCopaleen. O'Nolan's novels have attracted a wide following for their bizarre humour and modernist metafiction. As a novelist, O'Nolan was influenced by James Joyce
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Irish Nationalism
Irish nationalism
Irish nationalism
is an ideology which asserts that the Irish people are a nation. It is the Irish version of nationalism. Since the partition of Ireland, the term often refers to support for a united Ireland
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Araby (short Story)
"Araby" is a short story by James Joyce
James Joyce
published in his 1914 collection Dubliners.Contents1 Plot 2 Themes 3 Romantic elements 4 Later influence 5 Media adaptations 6 References 7 External linksPlot[edit] Through first-person narration, the reader is immersed at the start of the story in the drab life that people live on North Richmond Street, which seems to be illuminated only by the verve and imagination of the children who, despite the growing darkness that comes during the winter months, insist on playing "until [their] bodies glowed." Even though the conditions of this neighbourhood leave much to be desired, the children’s play is infused with their almost magical way of perceiving the world, which the narrator dutifully conveys to the reader:“ Our shouts echoed in the silent street
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Glasnevin Cemetery
Glasnevin
Glasnevin
Cemetery (Irish: Reilig Ghlas Naíon) is a large cemetery in Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland which opened in 1832.[1] It holds the graves and memorials of several notable figures, and has a museum.Contents1 History and description 2 Location 3 Features3.1 Memorials and graves 3.2 Angels plot 3.3 Crematorium 3.4 Museum and tours4 In literature 5 References 6 External linksHistory and description[edit] Prior to the establishment of
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Dubliners
Dubliners
Dubliners
is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914.[1] They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin
Dublin
in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism
Irish nationalism
was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland
Ireland
was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences a life-changing self-understanding or illumination
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Brian Moore (novelist)
James Tait Black Memorial Prize (1975) Governor General's Award for English language fiction (1960 and 1975)SpouseJacqueline ("Jackie") Sirois (née Scully) (m. 1952–1967) Jean Denny (m. 1967–1999)ChildrenMichael MooreBrian Moore (first name /briːˈæn/ bree-AN;[2] 25 August 1921 – 11 January 1999), who has been described as "one of the few genuine masters of the contemporary novel",[3] was a novelist and screenwriter from Northern Ireland[4][5][6] who emigrated to Canada and later lived in the United States. He was acclaimed for the descriptions in his novels of life in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
after the Second World War, in particular his explorations of the inter-communal divisions of The Troubles
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National Library Of Ireland
The National Library of Ireland
National Library of Ireland
(Irish: Leabharlann Náisiúnta na hÉireann) is Ireland's national library located in Dublin, in a building designed by Thomas Newenham Deane. The Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht is the member of the Irish Government responsible for the library. The mission of the National Library of Ireland
National Library of Ireland
is 'To collect, preserve, promote and make accessible the documentary and intellectual record of the life of Ireland and to contribute to the provision of access to the larger universe of recorded knowledge' The library is a reference library and, as such, does not lend. It has a large quantity of Irish and Irish-related material which can be consulted without charge; this includes books, maps, manuscripts, music, newspapers, periodicals and photographs
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