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James Barbour (burgess)
James Barbour
James Barbour
(1734 – 1804) was a prominent landowner and member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. This James Barbour
James Barbour
Jr. was the son of the former Sarah Todd and James Barbour
James Barbour
(1707-1775) who patented land in Spotsylvania County, Virginia
Spotsylvania County, Virginia
in 1731 and 1733, some of which would later be located in Orange County, Virginia
Orange County, Virginia
and Culpeper County, Virginia after those counties were created
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Virginia House Of Burgesses
The Virginia
Virginia
House of Burgesses
House of Burgesses
/ˈbɜːrdʒəsɪz/ was the first legislative assembly of elected representatives in North America.[1] The House was established by the Virginia
Virginia
Company, which created the body as part of an effort to encourage English craftsmen to settle in North America, and to make conditions in the colony more agreeable for its current inhabitants.[2] From 1619 to 1776, the representative branch of the legislature of Virginia
Virginia
was the House of Burgesses, which governed in conjunction with a colonial governor and his council. Jamestown remained the capital of the Virginia
Virginia
colony until 1699, when the government was moved to Williamsburg
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Alfred Madison Barbour
Alfred Madison Barbour (April 17, 1829 – April 4, 1866) was a Virginia
Virginia
lawyer, one-term delegate in the Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates and also in the Virginia
Virginia
Secession Convention of 1861. He may be best known for his role as Superintendent of the Harpers Ferry Armory
Harpers Ferry Armory
in Harpers Ferry, Virginia
Virginia
(now West Virginia) during John Brown's raid.[1] Although Barbour voted against secession, he became a major in the Confederate States Army
Confederate States Army
and served as a quartermaster during the American Civil War.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Government service 3 American Civil War 4 Death 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Barbour was born on April 17, 1829 on a plantation in Culpeper County, Virginia. He was the son of John S. Barbour, Member of the U.S
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Barbour Family
The Barbour family is a prominent American political family of Scottish origin from Virginia.[1] The progenitor of the Barbour family was James Barbour, who emigrated to Virginia
Virginia
from Scotland
Scotland
in the middle of the 17th-century.[1] Notable members[edit] The Barbour family's more notable members included James Barbour
James Barbour
(10 June 1775–7 June 1842), United States Senator, 18th Governor of Virginia, and 11th United States Secretary of War; John Strode Barbour, Sr. (8 August 1790–12 January 1855), Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Virginia's 15th congressional district; John Strode Barbour, Jr. (29 December 1820–14 May 1892), Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
U.S

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Mordecai Barbour
Mordecai Barbour (October 21, 1763 – January 4, 1846)[1][2][3][4][5] was a Culpeper County Militia officer during the American Revolutionary War and a prominent Virginia
Virginia
statesman, planter, and businessperson.[1] Barbour was the father of John Strode Barbour, Sr. (August 8, 1790 – January 12, 1855), member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Virginia's 15th congressional district; and the grandfather of John Strode Barbour, Jr. (December 29, 1820 – May 14, 1892), member of the U.S. House of Representatives
U.S

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John S. Barbour
John Strode Barbour Sr. (August 8, 1790 – January 12, 1855) was a nineteenth-century politician and lawyer from Virginia. He was the father of John Strode Barbour Jr. and the first cousin of James Barbour and Philip Pendleton Barbour.Contents1 Early and family life 2 Political career 3 Death and legacy 4 References 5 External linksEarly and family life[edit] Born at "Fleetwood" near Brandy Station, Virginia, Barbour attended private schools as a child, then the College of William and Mary, from which he graduated in 1808. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1811, commencing practice in Culpeper, Virginia. He served in the War of 1812
War of 1812
as an aide-de-camp. He married Elizabeth Byrne and had two sons (J.S. Barbour Jr
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Sextus Barbour
Dr. Sextus Barbour (July 26, 1813 – December 20, 1848) was a prominent American physician and planter. As the son of Philip Pendleton Barbour (May 25, 1783 – February 25, 1841), U.S. Congressman from Virginia
Virginia
and Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Barbour was a scion of the Barbour political family.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Writings 3 Death 4 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Barbour was born on July 26, 1813 in Orange County, Virginia
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John S. Barbour Jr.
John Strode Barbour Jr. (December 29, 1820 – May 14, 1892) was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Virginia. He is best remembered for taking power in Virginia
Virginia
from the short-lived Readjuster Party
Readjuster Party
in the late 1880s, forming the first political machine of "Conservative Democrats", whose power was to last 80 years until the demise of the Byrd Organization
Byrd Organization
in the late 1960s.[1]Contents1 Youth and education 2 Career 3 Death and legacy 4 See also 5 Sources 6 External linksYouth and education[edit] Barbour was born at Catalpa, near Culpeper, Virginia, the son of Virginia
Virginia
delegate and future U.S. Representative John S. Barbour. He had two sisters and a younger brother. Barbour attended the common schools and graduated from the law department of the University of Virginia
Virginia
at Charlottesville
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James Barbour (1828–1895)
James Barbour
James Barbour
(February 26, 1828 – October 29, 1895)[1][2][3] was a Virginia
Virginia
lawyer, planter, politician and Confederate officer. He represented Culpeper County, Virginia
Culpeper County, Virginia
in the Virginia
Virginia
General Assembly, as well as in the Virginia
Virginia
Constitutional Convention of 1850 and the Virginia
Virginia
secession convention of 1861
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John Strode Barbour (1866–1952)
John Strode Barbour (August 10, 1866 – May 6, 1952) was a Virginia lawyer, businessman, and politician.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Death 4 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Barbour was born on August 10, 1866 at Beauregard in Brandy Station, Culpeper County, Virginia. The Barbour political family, was one of the First Families of Virginia. His lawyer father James Barbour, had continued the family's political involvement, as well as served as a major in the Confederate States Army
Confederate States Army
during the American Civil War. His mother was Fanny Thomas Beckham, and also bore daughter, Mrs
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Barbour House
Coordinates: 38°50′39.5″N 77°18′26.5″W / 38.844306°N 77.307361°W / 38.844306; -77.307361 The Barbour House is an early 20th-century mansion in Fairfax, Virginia.[1] It takes its name from its prominent owner, John Strode Barbour.[1][2] Barbour House is located at 4069 Chain Bridge Road.[1] History[edit] Barbour House was the residence of John Strode Barbour (10 August 1866 – 6 May 1952),[2][3] a prominent American newspaper editor, lawyer, mayor, and statesman.[2] Barbour was a scion of the Barbour political family.[2][3] During the Barbours' ownership, the Barbour House was the center of Fairfax social life.[1] When the estate of Barbour's widow, Mary B
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Barboursville (James Barbour)
Barboursville is the ruin of the mansion of James Barbour, located in Barboursville, Virginia. He was the former U.S. Senator, U.S. Secretary of War, and Virginia
Virginia
Governor. It is now within the property of Barboursville Vineyards. The house was designed by Thomas Jefferson, president of the United States and Barbour's friend and political ally. The ruin is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.Contents1 Original Jeffersonian design 2 Destruction in fire 3 Related buildings 4 Gardens 5 Listing on National Register of Historic Places 6 Current use 7 See also 8 References 9 NotesOriginal Jeffersonian design[edit] Until it burned on Christmas
Christmas
Day 1884, Barbour's house stood essentially as completed, c
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Graffiti House
The Graffiti
Graffiti
House, located at 19484 Brandy Road in the eastern end of the town of Brandy Station, Virginia, is believed by the Brandy Station Foundation to have been built in 1858. It is one of few dwellings in the village built before the American Civil War
American Civil War
to survive intact to this day. The house is notable because of the Civil War era graffiti on many of the walls
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Catalpa (Culpeper, Virginia)
Catalpa
Catalpa
was an 18th-century plantation near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia.[1] Catalpa
Catalpa
is best known as the birthplace of John Strode Barbour, Jr
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Clover Hill (Culpeper, Virginia)
Clover Hill is a decaying 18th-century plantation house near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia.[1] Clover Hill is best known for serving as the headquarters for Brigadier General George Armstrong Custer during the American Civil War.[1][2] Clover Hill was home to James Barbour (26 February 1828 – 29 October 1895), a prominent American lawyer, planter, delegate from Virginia
Virginia
to the 1860 Democratic National Convention, delegate to the 1861
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