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James Berardinelli
James Berardinelli (born September 25, 1967)[1] is an American film critic and fantasy novelist.Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksPersonal life[edit] Berardinelli was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey
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Scent Of A Woman (1992 Film)
Scent of a Woman is a 1992 American drama film produced and directed by Martin Brest that tells the story of a preparatory school student who takes a job as an assistant to an irritable, blind, medically retired Army officer. The film is a remake of Dino Risi's 1974 Italian film Profumo di donna, adapted by Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
from the novel Il buio e il miele (it) (Italian: Darkness and Honey) by Giovanni Arpino and from the 1974 screenplay by Ruggero Maccari and Dino Risi. The film stars Al Pacino
Al Pacino
and Chris O'Donnell, with James Rebhorn, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Gabrielle Anwar. Pacino won the Academy Award for Best Actor
Academy Award for Best Actor
for his performance and the film was nominated for Best Director, Best Picture and Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published
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Twitter
Twitter
Twitter
(/ˈtwɪtər/) is a microblogging and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets". Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, this limit was doubled to 280 for all languages except Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.[14] Registered users can post, like, and retweet tweets, but unregistered users can only read them. Users access Twitter
Twitter
through its website interface, through Short Message Service
Short Message Service
(SMS) or its mobile-device application software ("app").[15] Twitter, Inc. is based in San Francisco, California, and has more than 25 offices around the world.[16] Twitter
Twitter
was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, Biz Stone, and Evan Williams, launched in July of that year. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times (sometimes abbreviated as LA Times or L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California, since 1881. It has the fourth largest circulation among United States
United States
newspapers, and is the largest U.S. newspaper not headquartered on the East Coast.[2] The paper is known for its coverage of issues particularly salient to the U.S. West Coast, such as immigration trends and natural disasters. It has won more than 40 Pulitzer Prizes for its coverage of these and other issues. As of June 18, 2018[update], ownership of the paper is controlled by Patrick Soon-Shiong, and the executive editor is Norman Pearlstine.[3] In the nineteenth century, the paper was known for its civic boosterism and opposition to unions, the latter of which led to the bombing of its headquarters in 1910
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South Florida Sun-Sentinel
The Sun-Sentinel
Sun-Sentinel
is the main daily newspaper of Broward County, Florida. Owned by Tronc, it circulates all throughout the three counties that comprise South Florida. It is the largest-circulation newspaper in the area. Howard Saltz of Delray Beach, Florida
Delray Beach, Florida
has held the position of editor since 2011.[3] Saltz was named publisher and editor-in-chief in 2016.[4] Saltz has been in news media since 1983 and held positions including reporter and editor in other cities before moving to South Florida and becoming the editor of the Sun-Sentinel.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] For many years, the Sun-Sentinel
Sun-Sentinel
exclusively targeted Broward County. However, it expanded its coverage to all of South Florida, including the Miami-Dade and Palm Beach areas, in the late 1990s
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Wired (magazine)
Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. Condé Nast's parent company Advance Publications
Advance Publications
is also the major shareholder of Reddit, an internet information conglomeration website.[3] In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan
as its "patron saint"
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Burlington County Times
The Burlington County Times is a daily newspaper located in Willingboro Township, New Jersey, U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
is an American review aggregation website for film and television. The company was launched in August 1998 and since January 2010 has been owned by Flixster, which was, in turn, acquired in 2011 by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
In February 2016, Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
and its parent site Flixster were sold to Comcast's Fandango
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Broadcast Film Critics Association
The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is an association of approximately 250 television, radio and online critics. Founded in 1995, it is the largest film critics organization in the United States and Canada.[1] The BFCA has presented the Critics' Choice Movie Awards each year since 1995
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Roger Ebert
Roger Joseph Ebert (/ˈiːbərt/; June 18, 1942 – April 4, 2013) was an American film critic, historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Criticism. Ebert and Chicago
Chicago
Tribune critic Gene Siskel
Gene Siskel
helped popularize nationally televised film reviewing when they co-hosted the PBS
PBS
show Sneak Previews, followed by several variously named At the Movies programs. The two verbally sparred and traded humorous barbs while discussing films. They created and trademarked the phrase "Two Thumbs Up," used when both hosts gave the same film a positive review
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Usenet
Usenet
Usenet
(/ˈjuːzˌnɛt/) is a worldwide distributed discussion system available on computers. It was developed from the general-purpose UUCP dial-up network architecture. Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea in 1979, and it was established in 1980.[1] Users read and post messages (called articles or posts, and collectively termed news) to one or more categories, known as newsgroups. Usenet
Usenet
resembles a bulletin board system (BBS) in many respects and is the precursor to Internet
Internet
forums that are widely used today. Discussions are threaded, as with web forums and BBSs, though posts are stored on the server sequentially. The name comes from the term "users network".[2][3] One notable difference between a BBS or web forum and Usenet
Usenet
is the absence of a central server and dedicated administrator
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
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Software
Computer software, or simply software, is a part of a computer system that consists of data or computer instructions, in contrast to the physical hardware from which the system is built. In computer science and software engineering, computer software is all information processed by computer systems, programs and data. Computer software includes computer programs, libraries and related non-executable data, such as online documentation or digital media. Computer hardware
Computer hardware
and software require each other and neither can be realistically used on its own. At the lowest level, executable code consists of machine language instructions specific to an individual processor—typically a central processing unit (CPU). A machine language consists of groups of binary values signifying processor instructions that change the state of the computer from its preceding state
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Fiber Optics
An optical fiber or optical fibre is a flexible, transparent fiber made by drawing glass (silica) or plastic to a diameter slightly thicker than that of a human hair.[1] Optical fibers are used most often as a means to transmit light between the two ends of the fiber and find wide usage in fiber-optic communications, where they permit transmission over longer distances and at higher bandwidths (data rates) than wire cables
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