HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Jake Eberts
Jake Eberts, OC (July 10, 1941 – September 6, 2012) was a Canadian film producer, executive and financier. He was known for risk-taking and producing a consistently high caliber of movies including such award-winning titles as Chariots of Fire
Chariots of Fire
(1981, uncredited), Gandhi (1982), Dances with Wolves
Dances with Wolves
(1990), and the successful animated feature Chicken Run
Chicken Run
(2000).Contents1 Life and career1.1 With Goldcrest Films 1.2 As an independent 1.3 National Geographic Feature Films2 Honours and other achievements 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Eberts was born John David Eberts in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, the son of Elizabeth (MacDougall), an interior decorator, and Edmond Eberts, who worked for an aluminum manufacturer.[1] Eberts grew up in Montreal and Arvida
[...More...]

"Jake Eberts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Montreal
Montreal
Montreal
(/ˌmʌntriˈɒl/ ( listen);[14] French: [mɔ̃ʁeal] ( listen); officially Montréal) is the most populous municipality in the Canadian province of Quebec and the second-most populous municipality in Canada
Canada
as a whole. Originally called Ville-Marie, or "City of Mary",[15] it is named after Mount Royal,[16] the triple-peaked hill in the heart of the city. The city is centred on the Island of Montreal, which took its name from the same source as the city,[17][18] and a few much smaller peripheral islands, the largest of which is Île Bizard
[...More...]

"Montreal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pathé
Pathé
Pathé
or Pathé
Pathé
Frères (French pronunciation: ​[pate fʁɛʁ], styled as PATHÉ!) is the name of various French businesses that were founded and originally run by the Pathé
Pathé
Brothers of France starting in 1896. In the early 1900s, Pathé
Pathé
became the world's largest film equipment and production company, as well as a major producer of phonograph records. In 1908, Pathé
Pathé
invented the newsreel that was shown in cinemas prior to a feature film.[2] Today, Pathé
Pathé
is a major film production and distribution company, owning a number of cinema chains through its subsidiary Les Cinémas Gaumont Pathé
Pathé
and television networks across Europe
[...More...]

"Pathé" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Academy Award
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
[...More...]

"Academy Award" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Richard Attenborough
Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough, CBE, FKC (UK: /ˈætənbərə/; 29 August 1923 – 24 August 2014), was an English actor, filmmaker, entrepreneur, and politician. He was the President of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
(RADA) and the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Attenborough joined the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
during World War II
World War II
and served in the film unit. He went on several bombing raids over Europe and filmed action from the rear gunner's position. He was the older brother of Sir David Attenborough, a naturalist and broadcaster, and John Attenborough, an executive at Alfa Romeo
[...More...]

"Richard Attenborough" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roland Joffé
Roland Joffé
Roland Joffé
(born 17 November 1945) is an English-French film director who is known for the Oscar-winning movies The Killing Fields and The Mission. He began his career in television. His early television credits included episodes of Coronation Street
Coronation Street
and an adaptation of The Stars Look Down
The Stars Look Down
for Granada. He gained a reputation for hard-hitting political stories with the series Bill Brand and factual dramas for Play for Today.Contents1 Education 2 Career2.1 TV director 2.2 Film director3 Personal life 4 Filmography4.1 Television 4.2 Film5 Awards and nominations 6 References 7 External linksEducation[edit] Joffé was educated at two independent schools: the Lycée français Charles de Gaulle in London, and Carmel College in Wallingford, Oxfordshire, which was Europe's only Jewish
Jewish
boarding school, until it closed in 1997
[...More...]

"Roland Joffé" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jean-Jacques Annaud
Jean-Jacques Annaud
Jean-Jacques Annaud
(born 1 October 1943) is a French film director, screenwriter and producer, best known for directing Quest for Fire (1981), The Name of the Rose
The Name of the Rose
(1986), The Bear (1988), The Lover (1992), and Seven Years in Tibet (1997). Annaud has received numerous awards for his work, including five César Awards, one David di Donatello Award, and one National Academy of Cinema Award.[1] Annaud's first film, Black and White in Color
Black and White in Color
(1976), received an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Filmography 4 Awards and nominations 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Jean-Jacques Annaud
Jean-Jacques Annaud
was born on 1 October 1943 in Juvisy-sur-Orge, Essonne
Essonne
in France
[...More...]

"Jean-Jacques Annaud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Boorman
John Boorman
John Boorman
(/ˈbʊərmən/; born 18 January 1933) is an English filmmaker who is best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Hell in the Pacific, Deliverance, Zardoz, Excalibur, The Emerald Forest, Hope and Glory, The General, The Tailor of Panama and Queen and Country. He has directed 22 films and received five Academy Award
Academy Award
nominations, twice for Best Director (for Deliverance, and Hope and Glory)
[...More...]

"John Boorman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Revolution (1985 Film)
Revolution is a 1985 British historical drama film directed by Hugh Hudson, written by Robert Dillon, and starring Al Pacino, Donald Sutherland and Nastassja Kinski. The film stars Pacino as a New York fur trapper who involuntarily gets enrolled in the Revolutionary forces during the American Revolutionary War. Revolution received a great deal of negative reviews upon release, and was a box office bomb; its release was delayed in Pacino's native New York City.[4] Due to the disappointment, Pacino took a four-year hiatus from films until 1989's Sea of Love.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Reception4.1 Accolades5 Director's cut 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPlot[edit]This article needs an improved plot summary. (March 2015)Fur trapper Tom Dobb unwillingly participates in the American Revolutionary War after his son Ned is drafted into the Army. Later, his son is captured by the British, and taken by the strict Sergeant Major Peasy
[...More...]

"Revolution (1985 Film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Mission (1986 Film)
The Mission is a 1986 British period drama film about the experiences of a Jesuit missionary in 18th-century South America.[4] Written by Robert Bolt and directed by Roland Joffé, the film stars Robert De Niro, Jeremy Irons, Ray McAnally, Aidan Quinn, Cherie Lunghi, and Liam Neeson. It won the Palme d'Or and the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. In April 2007, it was elected number one on the Church Times' Top 50 Religious Films list.[5] Furthermore, it is one of fifteen films listed in the category "Religion" on the Vatican film list.[6] The music, scored by Italian composer Ennio Morricone, ranked 1st on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) Classic 100 Music in the Movies.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Historical basis3.1 Historical inaccuracies4 Filming locations 5 Soundtrack 6 Reception 7 Awards and honours7.1 Others8 See also 9 References 10 External linksPlot[edit] The film is set in the 1740s and involves Spanish Jesuit
[...More...]

"The Mission (1986 Film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Absolute Beginners (film)
Absolute Beginners is a 1986 British rock musical film adapted from Colin MacInnes' book of the same name about life in late 1950s London. The film was directed by Julien Temple, featured David Bowie
David Bowie
and Sade, and Patsy Kensit
Patsy Kensit
in one of her first mainstream roles. The film was screened out of competition at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival.[4] Upon release, Absolute Beginners received immense coverage in the British media. At the time, the British film industry was perceived as being on the point of collapse (with the recent failure of the film Revolution). However, the film was panned by critics and became a box office bomb
[...More...]

"Absolute Beginners (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Terry Ilott
Hammer Film Productions is a British film production company based in London. Founded in 1934, the company is best known for a series of gothic horror films made from the mid-1950s until the 1970s. Many of these involved classic horror characters such as Baron Frankenstein, Count Dracula, and The Mummy, which Hammer re-introduced to audiences by filming them in vivid colour for the first time.[2] Hammer also produced science fiction, thrillers, film noir and comedies, as well as, in later years, television series. During their most successful years, Hammer dominated the horror film market, enjoying worldwide distribution and considerable financial success
[...More...]

"Terry Ilott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Name Of The Rose (film)
The Name of the Rose is a 1986 Italian-French-German drama mystery film directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud, based on the book of the same name by Umberto Eco.[2] Sean Connery stars as the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville and Christian Slater is his apprentice Adso of Melk, who are called upon to solve a deadly mystery in a medieval abbey.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Reception 5 Awards 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPlot[edit] As an old man, Adso of Melk recounts how, as a young novice in 1327, he and his mentor, Franciscan friar William of Baskerville, traveled to a Benedictine abbey in northern Italy where the Franciscans were to debate with Papal emissaries the poverty of Christ. The abbey boasts a famed scriptorium where scribes copy, translate or illuminate books. The monk Adelmo of Otranto —a young but famous manuscript illuminator— was suspiciously found dead, below a tower with only a window which cannot be opened
[...More...]

"The Name Of The Rose (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quebec
Quebec
Quebec
(/k(w)ɪˈbɛk/ ( listen);[8] French: Québec [kebɛk] ( listen))[9] is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario
Ontario
and the bodies of water James Bay
James Bay
and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait
Hudson Strait
and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec
Quebec
is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut
Nunavut
is larger
[...More...]

"Quebec" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Umberto Eco
Umberto Eco
Umberto Eco
OMRI (/ˈɛkoʊ/; Italian: [umˈbɛrto ˈɛːko]; 5 January 1932 – 19 February 2016) was an Italian novelist, literary critic, philosopher, semiotician, and university professor. He is best known internationally for his 1980 novel Il nome della rosa (The Name of the Rose), a historical mystery combining semiotics in fiction with biblical analysis, medieval studies, and literary theory. He later wrote other novels, including Il pendolo di Foucault (Foucault's Pendulum) and L'isola del giorno prima (The Island of the Day Before). His novel Il cimitero di Praga (The Prague Cemetery), released in 2010, topped the bestseller charts in Italy.[2] Eco also wrote academic texts, children's books, and essays
[...More...]

"Umberto Eco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hope And Glory (film)
Hope and Glory is a 1987 British comedy-drama-war film, written, produced and directed by John Boorman
John Boorman
and based on his own experiences of growing up in the Blitz in London
London
during the Second World War.[2][3] The title is derived from the traditional British patriotic song "Land of Hope and Glory". The film was distributed by Columbia Pictures. The film tells the story of the Rohan family and their experiences of the Blitz as seen through the eyes of the son, Billy (Sebastian Rice-Edwards). Hope and Glory was a critical and commercial success; it won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy and received five Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay
[...More...]

"Hope And Glory (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.