HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Jainism In North Karnataka
Jainism
Jainism
in North Karnataka
North Karnataka
flourished under the Chalukyas, Kadamba, Rashtrakutas, and Vijayanagara empire. Imbued with religious feeling, patronage was extended towards the building of Jain temple
Jain temple
and it garnered high repute among the people, particularly the ruling classes and the mercantile community; effectively getting treated as the state religion.[1]Contents1 Literature 2 Jain architecture 3 Dakshina Bharati Jain Sabha 4 See also 5 References5.1 Citation 5.2 SourcesLiterature[edit] The Kannada poet Adikavi Pampa’s wrote Vikramarjuna Vijaya, also known as Pampa Bharata, and also Adipurana
Adipurana
which narrates the story of Rishabha, the first tirthankara
[...More...]

"Jainism In North Karnataka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lakkundi
Lakkundi[1][2] in Gadag District
Gadag District
of Karnataka
Karnataka
is a tiny village on the way to Hampi
Hampi
(Hosapete) from Hubballi. Lakkundi
Lakkundi
11 km from Gadag in the east. It is 14 km from Dambal
Dambal
and 25 km from Mahadeva Temple (Itagi). Lakkundi, is full of ruined temples[3] like Mallikarjuna, Virabhadra, Manikeshwara, Nanneshwara, Lakshminarayana, Someshwara, Nilakanteshwara and many more. Lakkundi
Lakkundi
is a place of antiquarian interest with as many as 50 temples, 101 stepped wells (called Kalyani or Pushkarni) and 29 inscriptions, spread over the period of the later Chalukyas, Kalachuris, Seuna
Seuna
and the Hoysalas. A great center of Kalyani Chalukyas
Chalukyas
art, there are several temples of note here
[...More...]

"Lakkundi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Diwali
Diwali
Diwali
or Deepavali is the Hindu
Hindu
festival of lights celebrated every year in autumn in the northern hemisphere (spring in southern hemisphere).[4][5] It is an official holiday in Fiji, Guyana, India,[6] Malaysia, Mauritius, Myanmar, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago
[...More...]

"Diwali" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dharma (Jainism)
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
[...More...]

"Dharma (Jainism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jain Agamas
Agamas are texts of Jainism
Jainism
based on the discourses of the tirthankara. The discourse delivered in a samavasarana (divine preaching hall) is called Śhrut Jnāna and comprises eleven angas and fourteen purvas.[1] The discourse is recorded by Ganadharas (chief disciples), and is composed of twelve angas (departments). It is generally represented by a tree with twelve branches.[2] This forms the basis of the Jaina Agamas or canons. These are believed to have originated from Rishabhanatha, the first tirthankara.[3] The earliest versions of Jain
Jain
Agamas known were composed in Ardhamagadhi Prakrit
[...More...]

"Jain Agamas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kundakunda
Acharya
Acharya
Kundakunda
Kundakunda
is a revered Digambara
Digambara
Jain monk and philosopher. He authored many Jain texts
Jain texts
such as: Samayasara, Niyamasara, Pancastikayasara, Pravachanasara, Atthapahuda and Barasanuvekkha. He occupies the highest place in the tradition of the Digambara
Digambara
Jain acharyas, a position comparable to Christ in Christianity and Muhammad in Islam. All Digambara
Digambara
Jains say his name before starting to read the scripture
[...More...]

"Kundakunda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Siddhasena
Siddhasēna Divākara (Jain Prakrit: सिद्दसेन दिवाकर) was an Digambara
Digambara
monk in the fifth century CE who wrote works on Jain philosophy
Jain philosophy
and epistemology.[1] He was like the illuminating lamp of the Jain order and therefore came to be known as Divākara "Lamp-Maker". He is credited with the authorship of many books, most of which are not available. Sanmatitarka (‘The Logic of the True Doctrine’) is the first major Jain work on logic written in Sanskrit.[2][3]Contents1 Life 2 Thought 3 Works 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Siddhasena
Siddhasena
Divakara is said to have lived from 500 CE to 610 CE. He was a Brahmin by birth and a scholar. He was initiated by Acharya Vruddhavadi.[4] According to the tradition, Siddhasena
Siddhasena
Divakara once planned to translate all the Jaina works from prakrit to Sanskrit
[...More...]

"Siddhasena" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Samantabhadra (Jain Monk)
Samantabhadra was a Digambara
Digambara
acharya (head of the monastic order) who lived about the later part of the second century CE[1][2] He was a proponent of the Jaina doctrine of Anekantavada. The Ratnakaranda śrāvakācāra is the most popular work of Samantabhadra. Samantabhadra lived after Umaswami
Umaswami
but before Pujyapada.Contents1 Life 2 Thought 3 Works 4 Praise 5 References 6 SourcesLife[edit] Samantabhadra is said to have lived from 150 CE to 250 CE. He was from southern India during the time of Chola dynasty. He was a poet, logician, eulogist and an accomplished linguist.[3] He is credited with spreading Jainism
Jainism
in southern India.[4] Samantabhadra, in his early stage of asceticism, was attacked with a disease known as bhasmaka (the condition of insatiable hunger).[5] As, digambara monks don't eat more than once in a day, he endured great pain
[...More...]

"Samantabhadra (Jain Monk)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Haribhadra
Haribhadra
Haribhadra
Suri was a Svetambara
Svetambara
mendicant Jain leader and author. There are multiple contradictory dates assigned to his birth. According to tradition, he lived c. 459–529 CE. However, in 1919, a Jain monk named Jinavijayi pointed out that given his familiarity with Dharmakirti, a more likely choice would be sometime after 650.[1] In his writings, Haribhadra
Haribhadra
identifies himself as a student of Jinabhadra and Jinadatta of the Vidyadhara Kula. There are several, somewhat contradictory, accounts of his life
[...More...]

"Haribhadra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Yashovijaya
Yashovijaya
Yashovijaya
(IAST: Yaśovijaya, 1624–1688), a seventeenth-century Jain philosopher-monk, was a notable Indian philosopher and logician. He was a thinker, prolific writer and commentator who had a strong and lasting influence on Jainism.[1] He was a disciple of Muni Nayavijaya in the lineage of Jain monk Hiravijaya
[...More...]

"Yashovijaya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digambara
Digambara
Digambara
(/dɪˈɡʌmbərə/; "sky-clad") is one of the two major schools of Jainism, the other being Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
(white-clad). The word Digambara
Digambara
(Sanskrit) is a combination of two words: dig (directions) and ambara (sky), referring to those whose garments are of the element that fills the four quarters of space. Digambara
Digambara
monks do not wear any clothes. The monks carry picchi, a broom made up of fallen peacock feathers (for clearing the place before walking or sitting), kamandalu (a water container made of wood), and shastra (scripture). One of the most important scholar-monks of Digambara tradition was Kundakunda. He authored Prakrit
Prakrit
texts such as the Samayasāra
Samayasāra
and the Pravacanasāra
[...More...]

"Digambara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Śvētāmbara
The Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
(/ʃwɛˈtʌmbərə/; Sanskrit: श्वेतांबर or श्वेतपट śvētapaṭa; also spelled Svetambar, Shvetambara, Shvetambar, Swetambar or Shwetambar) is one of the two main branches of Jainism, the other being the Digambara. Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
"white-clad" is a term describing its ascetics' practice of wearing white clothes, which sets it apart from the Digambara
Digambara
"sky-clad" Jainas, whose ascetic practitioners go naked. Śvētāmbaras, unlike Digambaras, do not believe that ascetics must practice nudity.[1] Śvētāmbaras also believe that women are able to obtain moksha. Śvētāmbaras maintain that the 19th Tirthankara, Māllīnātha, was a woman.Contents1 History 2 Denominations 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
tradition follows the lineage of Sthulabhadra
[...More...]

"Śvētāmbara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Samayasāra
Samayasāra
Samayasāra
(The Nature of the Self) is a famous Jain text
Jain text
composed by Acharya Kundakunda
Kundakunda
in 439 verses.[1] Its ten chapters discuss the nature of Jīva (pure self/soul), its attachment to Karma and Moksha (liberation)
[...More...]

"Samayasāra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pravachanasara
Pravachanasara, is a text composed by Jain monk, Kundakunda, in about the mid-second century BC. It means "Essence of Scriptures" or "Essence of Sermons" or "Essence of Doctrine". In the text, Kundakunda shows how the correct understanding of the duality of self and others leads to that defining characteristic of Digambara
Digambara
mendicant praxis, nudity.[2] It consists of three chapters and 275 verses. First chapter consists of 92 verses and it describes attributes of Supreme Beings and outlines the first steps in the process of transforming oneself into a Supreme Being. Second chapter consists of 108 verses and it describes laws of interaction between space, time particles, elementary matter particles, compound matter particles, motion and souls in the Cosmos
[...More...]

"Pravachanasara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Brahma Jinalaya
Jain Temple, Lakkundi Brahma
Brahma
JinalayaBasic informationLocation Lakkundi, KarnatakaAffiliation JainismDeity MahaviraFestivals Mahavir JayantiArchitectural descriptionCreator Kalyani ChalukyasDate established mid-11th centuryThe Jain Temple, Lakkundi
Lakkundi
or Brahma
Brahma
Jinalaya is located in the historically important temple town Lakkundi
Lakkundi
in the Gadag District
Gadag District
of Karnataka
Karnataka
state, India. Known as Lokkigundi in medieval times, the town was of considerable importance during the 11-12th century A.D. Western Chalukya
Western Chalukya
rule
[...More...]

"Brahma Jinalaya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tattvartha Sutra
Tattvartha Sutra
Sutra
(also known as Tattvarth-adhigama-sutra) is an ancient Jain text
Jain text
written by Acharya Umaswami, sometime between the 2nd- and 5th-century AD.[3][4][1] It is one of the first Jain scriptures written in the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language instead of the Jain liturgical language of Ardha Magadhi.[5] Tattvartha Sutra
Sutra
is also known in Jainism
Jainism
as the Moksha-shastra (Scripture describing the path of liberation). The Tattvartha Sutra
Sutra
is regarded as one of the earliest, most authoritative books on Jainism, and the only text authoritative in both the Digambara
Digambara
and Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
sects (prior to the Saman Suttam)
[...More...]

"Tattvartha Sutra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.