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Jahangirnama
Jahangirnameh[1] (Persian: جهانگیرنامه‎) is a poem in Persian language
Persian language
which relates the story of Jahangir son of Rostam. It is composed in the same meter as Shahnameh. The author mentions his name as Qāsem-e Mādeḥ in one of the last couplets of the poem. Composed in Herat, it contains nearly 3,600 couplets. Unlike other poems in Persian, Jahangirnameh contains relatively high number of Arabic loanwords, and the stories also were under Islamic influence. According to Zabihullah Safa, this indicates that the poem is composed in late 6th century AH or early 7th century AH. The poem seems to be largely an imitation of the Borzu Nama. In both stories, Rostam's son is brought up in Turan
Turan
by Turanians and unknowingly fights against his Iranian compatriots. But at the end, he is recognized by Iranians and then joins Iranian army. References[edit]^ de Blois, François. "EPICS"
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Persian Language
Persian (/ˈpɜːrʒən/ or /ˈpɜːrʃən/), also known by its endonym Farsi[8][9] (فارسی fārsi [fɒːɾˈsiː] ( listen)), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(officially known as Dari since 1958),[10] and Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(officially known as Tajiki since the Soviet era),[11] and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran
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Rostam
Rostam
Rostam
or Rustam (Persian: رُستَم‎, pronounced [ɾos'tæm, ɾʊs'tæm]) is the most celebrated legendary hero in Shahnameh
Shahnameh
and Iranian mythology. In Shahnameh, Rostam
Rostam
and his predecessors are Marzbans of Sistan
Sistan
(present-day Iran
Iran
and Afghanistan). Rostam
Rostam
is best known for his tragic fight with Esfandiar, the other legendary Iranian hero, for his expedition to Mazandaran (not to be confused with the modern Mazandaran province), and for his mournful fight with his son, Sohrab, who was killed in the battle. Rostam
Rostam
was eventually killed by Shaghad, his half-brother
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Herat
Herat
Herat
(/hɛˈrɑːt/;[3] Persian: هرات‎, Herât; Pashto: هرات‎; Ancient Greek: Ἀλεξάνδρεια ἡ ἐν Ἀρίοις, Alexándreia hē en Aríois; Latin: Alexandria Ariorum) is the third-largest city of Afghanistan. It has a population of about 436,300,[2] and serves as the capital of Herat
Herat
Province, situated in the fertile valley of the Hari River. It is linked with Kandahar
Kandahar
and Mazar-e-Sharif
Mazar-e-Sharif
via Highway 1 or the ring road. It is further linked to the city of Mashhad
Mashhad
in neighboring Iran
Iran
through the border town of Islam Qala, and to Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
through the border town of Torghundi, both about 100 km (62 mi) away. Herat
Herat
dates back to the Avestan times and was traditionally known for its wine
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Borzu Nama
The Borzu Nama (pronounced as Borzū-Nāma or Borzū-Nāme) (Persian: برزونامه‎) is a Persian epic poem of about 65,000 couplets recounting the exploits and adventures of the legendary hero Borzu, son of Sohrab[1][2] and grandson of Rostam.Contents1 Plot 2 Editions 3 Possible influences 4 See also 5 NotesPlot[edit] Abraham Hyacinthe Anquetil-Duperron identifies the author as 'Ata'i, who is further identified as 'Amid Abu'l 'Ala' 'Ata b. Yaqub Kateb Razi by Blochet. He was a poet of the Ghaznavid court and died around 1078-1079. The language of the Borzu-nama is characteristics of texts of the 11th century. The story is versified in the same meter and style of Ferdowsi's Shahnama. The Borzu-nama is possibly the longest of the post Shahnama epic poems and includes material from Iranian national legends not used by Ferdowsi.[1] The story starts with Sohrab the son of Rostam. On his way from Turan to fight the Iranians he marries a woman named Shahru
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Turan
List of the areas mentioned in the map as part of Turan: 1. Khwarezm 2. Bukhara
Bukhara
with Balkh
Balkh
3. Shehersebz (near Bukhara) 4. Hissar 5. Khokand
Khokand
6. Durwaz 7. Karategin 8. Kunduz
Kunduz
9. Kafiristan
Kafiristan
10. Chitral
Chitral
11. Gilgit
Gilgit
12. Iskardu
Iskardu
13.14. The northern steppes (Kazakhstan). Turan
Turan
(Persian: توران Tūrān, "the land of the Tur") is a region in Central Asia. The term is of Iranian origin[1] and may refer to a particular prehistoric human settlement, a historic geographical region, or a culture
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Jahangirnameh
Jahangirnameh[1] (Persian: جهانگیرنامه‎) is a poem in Persian language which relates the story of Jahangir son of Rostam. It is composed in the same meter as Shahnameh. The author mentions his name as Qāsem-e Mādeḥ in one of the last couplets of the poem. Composed in Herat, it contains nearly 3,600 couplets. Unlike other poems in Persian, Jahangirnameh contains relatively high number of Arabic loanwords, and the stories also were under Islamic influence. According to Zabihullah Safa, this indicates that the poem is composed in late 6th century AH or early 7th century AH. The poem seems to be largely an imitation of the Borzu Nama. In both stories, Rostam's son is brought up in Turan by Turanians and unknowingly fights against his Iranian compatriots. But at the end, he is recognized by Iranians and then joins Iranian army. References[edit]^ de Blois, François. "EPICS". www.iranicaonline.org. Encyclopaedia Iranica
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