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Jag Mandir
Coordinates: 24°34′04″N 73°40′41″E / 24.567804°N 73.677945°E / 24.567804; 73.677945 Jag Mandir
Jag Mandir
is a palace built on an island in the Lake Pichola. It is also called the "Lake Garden Palace". The palace is located in Udaipur
Udaipur
city in the Indian state
Indian state
of Rajasthan. Its construction is credited to three Maharanas of the Sisodia
Sisodia
Rajputs
Rajputs
of Mewar
Mewar
kingdom. The construction of the palace was started in 1551 by Maharana Amar Singh, continued by Maharana Karan Singh (1620–1628) and finally completed by Maharana Jagat Singh I (1628–1652). It is named as "Jagat Mandir" in honour of the last named Maharana Jagat Singh
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Polystyrene
Polystyrene
Polystyrene
(PS) /ˌpɒliˈstaɪriːn/ is a synthetic aromatic polymer made from the monomer styrene. Polystyrene
Polystyrene
can be solid or foamed. General-purpose polystyrene is clear, hard, and rather brittle. It is an inexpensive resin per unit weight. It is a rather poor barrier to oxygen and water vapour and has a relatively low melting point.[5] Polystyrene
Polystyrene
is one of the most widely used plastics, the scale of its production being several million tonnes per year.[6] Polystyrene
Polystyrene
can be naturally transparent, but can be coloured with colourants
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Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
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Court
A court is a tribunal, often as a government institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters in accordance with the rule of law.[1] In both common law and civil law legal systems, courts are the central means for dispute resolution, and it is generally understood that all persons have an ability to bring their claims before a court. Similarly, the rights of those accused of a crime include the right to present a defense before a court. The system of courts that interprets and applies the law is collectively known as the judiciary. The place where a court sits is known as a venue
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Ruby
A ruby is a pink to blood-red colored gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum (aluminium oxide). Other varieties of gem-quality corundum are called sapphires. Ruby
Ruby
is one of the traditional cardinal gems, together with amethyst, sapphire, emerald, and diamond.[3] The word ruby comes from ruber, Latin
Latin
for red. The color of a ruby is due to the element chromium. The quality of a ruby is determined by its color, cut, and clarity, which, along with carat weight, affect its value. The brightest and most valuable shade of red called blood-red or pigeon blood, commands a large premium over other rubies of similar quality. After color follows clarity: similar to diamonds, a clear stone will command a premium, but a ruby without any needle-like rutile inclusions may indicate that the stone has been treated
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Marathas
The Maratha
Maratha
(IPA: [ˈˈməraʈʰa"]; IAST:Marāṭhā; archaically transliterated as Marhatta or Mahratta) is a group of castes in India found predominantly in the state of Maharashtra. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, "Marathas are people of India, famed in history as yeoman warriors and champions of Hinduism"[1][note 1]. The Maratha
Maratha
group of castes is a largely rural class of peasant cultivators, landowners, and soldiers
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Neemuch
Neemuch[1] or Nimach
Nimach
is a town in the Malwa
Malwa
region of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. The town shares its northeastern border with state of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
and is the administrative headquarters of Neemuch District. Formerly a large British cantonment of Gwalior princely state, in 1822 the town became the headquarters of the combined Rajputana– Malwa
Malwa
political agency and of the Malwa
Malwa
Agency in 1895. The British Cantonment was disbanded in 1932 after which it was maintained by a British Municipal Board. Neemuch
Neemuch
was the birthplace of the Central Reserve Police Force
Central Reserve Police Force
(CRPF) in 1939 and is home to a large scale army recruitment centre for the organisation. The CRPF still maintains part of Neemuch's British Military Cantonment, which was the first of its kind in India
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Indian Rebellion Of 1857
British victorySuppression of the revolt Formal end of the Mughal empire End of Company rule in India Transfer of rule to the British CrownTerritorial changes British Indian Empire created out of former East India
India
Company territory (some land returned to native rulers, other land confiscated by the British crown)Belligerents Sepoy
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Indian Mutiny
British victorySuppression of the revolt Formal end of the Mughal empire End of Company rule in India Transfer of rule to the British CrownTerritorial changes British Indian Empire created out of former East India
India
Company territory (some land returned to native rulers, other land confiscated by the British crown)Belligerents Sepoy
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British Raj
Indian languagesGovernment ColonyMonarch of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Emperor/Empressa •  1858–1901 Victoria •  1901–1910 Edward VII •  1910–1936 George V •  1936 Edward VIII •  1936–1947 George VI Viceroy
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Independence Of India
The Indian independence movement
Indian independence movement
encompassed activities and ideas aiming to end the East India Company
East India Company
rule (1757–1857) and the British Indian Empire (1857–1947) in the Indian subcontinent. The movement spanned a total of 90 years (1857–1947). The first organised militant movements were in Bengal, but they later took movement in the newly formed Indian National Congress
Indian National Congress
with prominent moderate leaders seeking only their basic right to appear for Indian Civil Service (British India)
Indian Civil Service (British India)
examinations, as well as more rights, economic in nature, for the people of the soil. The early part of the 20th century saw a more radical approach towards political self-rule proposed by leaders such as the Lal, Bal, Pal and Aurobindo Ghosh, V. O. Chidambaram Pillai
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Crescent
A crescent shape (/ˈkrɛsənt/, British English
British English
also /ˈkrɛzənt/[1]) is a symbol or emblem used to represent the lunar phase in the first quarter (the "sickle moon"), or by extension a symbol representing the Moon
Moon
itself. It is used as the astrological symbol for the Moon, and hence as the alchemical symbol for silver. It was also the emblem of Diana/Artemis, and hence represented virginity
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Chhatris
Chhatris are elevated, dome-shaped pavilions used as an element in Indian architecture. The word Chhatri means "canopy" or "umbrella." In the context of architecture, the word is used to refer to two different things. The usual and more widely understood meaning is of a memorial, usually very ornate, built over the site where the funeral (cremation) of an important personage was performed. Such memorials usually consist of a platform girded by a set of ornate pillars which hold up a stone canopy. The word chhatri is also used to refer to the small pavilions that mark the corners and roof of the entrance of a major building. These pavilions are purely decorative and have no utility, but are a classic folly displaying the status and wealth of the owner. Chhatris are commonly used to depict the elements of pride and honour in Jat, Maratha and Rajput architecture. They are widely used in palaces, in forts, or to demarcate funerary sites
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Taj Mahal
The Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal
(/ˌtɑːdʒ məˈhɑːl, ˌtɑːʒ-/;[3] meaning "Crown of the Palace"[4]) is an ivory-white marble mausoleum on the south bank of the Yamuna
Yamuna
river in the Indian city of Agra
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Cornice
A cornice (from the Italian cornice meaning "ledge") is generally any horizontal decorative molding that crowns a building or furniture element – the cornice over a door or window, for instance, or the cornice around the top edge of a pedestal or along the top of an interior wall. A simple cornice may be formed just with a crown. The function of the projecting cornice of a building is to throw rainwater free of the building’s walls. In residential building practice, this function is handled by projecting gable ends, roof eaves, and gutters. However, house eaves may also be called "cornices" if they are finished with decorative molding
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