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J. M. W. Turner
Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (23 April 1775 – 19 December 1851), known as J. M. W. Turner
J. M. W. Turner
and contemporarily as William Turner,[a] was an English Romantic painter, printmaker and watercolourist, known for his expressive colourisation, imaginative landscapes and turbulent, often violent marine paintings. Turner was born in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London, to a modest lower middle-class family. He lived in London
London
all his life, retaining his Cockney accent
Cockney accent
and assiduously avoiding the trappings of success and fame. A child prodigy, Turner studied at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
of Arts from 1789, enrolling when he was 14, and exhibited his first work there at 21. During this period, he also served as an architectural draftsman
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James Wyatt
James Wyatt
James Wyatt
RA (3 August 1746 – 4 September 1813) was an English architect, a rival of Robert Adam
Robert Adam
in the neoclassical style and neo-Gothic style.Contents1 Early classical career 2 Later classical work 3 Gothic architecture 4 Death 5 List of architectural works[3]5.1 Public buildings 5.2 Churches 5.3 London houses 5.4 New country houses 5.5 Garden buildings & follies 5.6 Alterations to existing country houses6 Notes 7 See also 8 Footnotes 9 References 10 External linksEarly classical career[edit] Wyatt spent six years in Italy, 1762–68, in company with Richard Bagot of Staffordshire, who was Secretary to the Earl of Northampton's embassy to the Venetian Republic. In Venice, Wyatt studied with Antonio Visentini
Antonio Visentini
(1688–1782) as an architectural draughtsman and painter. In Rome
Rome
he made measured drawings of the dome of St
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Eccentricity (behavior)
Eccentricity (also called quirkiness) is unusual or odd behavior on the part of an individual. This behavior would typically be perceived as unusual or unnecessary, without being demonstrably maladaptive. Eccentricity is contrasted with "normal" behavior, the nearly universal means by which individuals in society solve given problems and pursue certain priorities in everyday life. People who consistently display benignly eccentric behavior are labeled as "eccentrics".Contents1 Etymology 2 Depictions 3 Comparison to considerations of normality3.1 Characteristics4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] From Medieval Latin eccentricus, derived from Greek ekkentros, "out of the center", from ek-, ex- "out of" + kentron, "center". Eccentric first appeared in English essays as a neologism in 1551 as an astronomical term meaning "a circle in which the earth, sun, etc. deviates from its center." Five years later, in 1556, an adjective form of the word was used
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Sketchbook
A sketchbook is a book or pad with blank pages for sketching and is frequently used by artists for drawing or painting as a part of their creative process. The exhibition of sketchbooks at the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University
Harvard University
in 2006 suggested that there were two broad categories for classifying sketches:Observation: this focuses on the documentation of the external world and includes many such travel and nature studies and sketches recording an artist's travels. Invention: this follows the artists' digressions and internal journeys as they develop compositional ideasContents1 Types of sketchbooks 2 Online sketchbooks 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTypes of sketchbooks[edit] Sketchbooks come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, with varied covers, and differing numbers of pages. Sketchbooks began as a way to provide a readily available supply of drawing paper in the convenient form of a book
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Covent Garden
Covent Garden
Covent Garden
(/ˈkɒvənt/ or /ˈkʌvənt/) is a district of Westminster, in Greater London, on the eastern fringes of the West End, between Charing Cross Road
Charing Cross Road
and Drury Lane.[1] It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House, which is also known as "Covent Garden"
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Royal Academy Summer Exhibition
The Summer Exhibition is an open art exhibition held annually by the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
in Burlington House, Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in central London, England, during the months of June, July, and August. The exhibition includes paintings, prints, drawings, sculpture, architectural designs and models, and is the largest and most popular open exhibition in the United Kingdom.[1] A Private View at the Royal Academy, 1881
A Private View at the Royal Academy, 1881
by William Powell Frith, depicting Oscar Wilde
Oscar Wilde
and other Victorian worthies at a private view of the 1881 exhibitionWhen the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
was founded in 1768 one of its key objectives was to establish an annual exhibition, open to all artists of merit, which could be visited by the public
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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Bethlem Hospital
Coordinates: 51°22′51″N 0°01′50″W / 51.3809°N 0.0306°W / 51.3809; -0.0306Bethlem Psychiatric HospitalKing's Health Partners South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation TrustBethlem Royal HospitalGeographyLocation Bromley, London, Greater London, EnglandOrganisationCare system NHSHospital type SpecialistServicesEmergency department Admissions through A&EBeds Approx 350Speciality Psychiatric hospitalHistoryFounded 1247 as priory 1330 as hospitalLinksWebsite www.slam.nhs.ukLists Hospitals in EnglandBethlem Royal Hospital, also known as St Mary Bethlehem, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam, is a psychiatric hospital in London. Its famous history has inspired several horror books, films and TV series, most notably Bedlam, a 1946 film with Boris Karloff
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St Luke's Hospital For Lunatics
St Luke's Hospital for Lunatics was founded in London in 1751 for the treatment of incurable pauper lunatics by a group of philanthropic apothecaries and others. It was the second public institution in London created to look after mentally ill people, after the Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlem (Bedlam), founded in 1246.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Notable patients 3 References 4 See alsoHistory[edit]1896 map of Old Street showing a plan of the hospital.The first chief physician was Dr William Battie who was renowned as ‘an eccentric humorist’. He believed ‘the patients of this hospital shall not be exposed to publick view.’ Medical treatment consisted of cold plunge baths to shake lunatics out of their insanity. A system of non-restraint was professed, however manacles and other restraints were sometimes used.[3] The hospital was originally housed in a converted foundry in Windmill Street, Upper Moorfields, close to Bedlam
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The Needles
The Needles
The Needles
is a row of three distinctive stacks of chalk that rise about 30m out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, United Kingdom, close to Alum Bay, and part of Totland, the westernmost Civil Parish
Civil Parish
of the Isle of Wight. The Needles
The Needles
Lighthouse stands at the outer, western end of the formation
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Isle Of Wight
The Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
(/waɪt/; also referred to informally as IoW or The Island)[4] is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, about 2 miles (3.2 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House
Osborne House
at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets
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History Painting
History
History
painting is a genre in painting defined by its subject matter rather than artistic style. History
History
paintings usually depict a moment in a narrative story, rather than a specific and static subject, as in a portrait. The term is derived from the wider senses of the word historia in Latin and Italian, meaning "story" or "narrative", and essentially means "story painting"
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Claude Joseph Vernet
Claude-Joseph Vernet (14 August 1714 – 3 December 1789) was a French painter. His son, Antoine Charles Horace Vernet, was also a painter.Contents1 Life and work 2 Gallery 3 Literary references 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit]Bust of Claude-Joseph Vernet, 1783 CE. From Paris, France. By Louis-Simon Boizot. The Victoria and Albert Museum, LondonVernet was born in Avignon. When only fourteen years of age he aided his father, Antoine Vernet (1689–1753),[1] a skilled decorative painter, in the most important parts of his work. The panels of sedan chairs, however, could not satisfy his ambition, and Vernet started for Rome
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Joseph Bonomi The Elder
Joseph Bonomi the Elder ARA (19 January 1739 – 9 March 1808) was an Italian architect and draughtsman who spent most of his career in England where he became a successful designer of country houses.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Architectural style 4 Works 5 Literature 6 Notes 7 ReferencesBiography[edit] He was born Giuseppe Bonomi in Rome[1] on 19 January 1739. He was educated at the Collegio Romano and then studied architecture with Girolamo Teodoli.[2] He made his early reputation in Rome before moving to London in 1767 at the invitation of Robert and James Adam,[2] who employed him as a draughtsman from 1768.[1] In his early years in England Bonomi also worked as an assistant to Thomas Leverton.[3] He became a close friend of the painter Angelica Kauffman, whose cousin Rosa Florini he married in 1775
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Perspective (graphical)
Perspective (from Latin: perspicere "to see through") in the graphic arts is an approximate representation, generally on a flat surface (such as paper), of an image as it is seen by the eye
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Sunningwell
Sunningwell
Sunningwell
is a village and civil parish about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) south of Oxford, England. The parish includes the village of Bayworth
Bayworth
and the eastern part of Boars Hill
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