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J. Baldwin
James Tennant Baldwin (May 6, 1933 – March 5, 2018) was an American industrial designer and writer.[1] Baldwin was a student of Buckminster Fuller; Baldwin's work has been inspired by Fuller's principles and (in the case of some of Baldwin's published writing) has popularized and interpreted Fuller's ideas and achievements. In his own right, Baldwin has been a figure in American designers' efforts to incorporate solar, wind, and other renewable sources of energy. In his career, being a fabricator has been as important as being a designer.[2] Baldwin is noted as the inventor of the "Pillow Dome,"[3] a design that combines Buckminster Fuller's geodesic dome with panels of inflated ETFE
ETFE
plastic panels.Contents1 Life and work 2 Books 3 References 4 External linksLife and work[edit] J. Baldwin was born the son of an engineer
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Industrial Design
Industrial design
Industrial design
is a process of design applied to products that are to be manufactured through techniques of mass production.[2][3] Its key characteristic is that design is separated from manufacture: the creative act of determining and defining a product's form and features takes place in advance of the physical act of making a product, which consists purely of repeated, often automated, replication.[4][5] This distinguishes industrial design from craft-based design, where the form of the product is determined by the product's creator at the time of its creation.[6
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Marketing
Marketing
Marketing
is the study and management of exchange relationships.[1][2] Marketing
Marketing
is used to create, keep and satisfy the customer
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Earthrise
Earthrise
Earthrise
is a photograph of the Earth
Earth
and parts of the Moon's surface taken from lunar orbit by astronaut Bill Anders
Bill Anders
in 1968, during the Apollo 8
Apollo 8
mission
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Ken Kesey
Kenneth Elton "Ken" Kesey (/ˈkiːziː/; September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American novelist, essayist, and countercultural figure. He considered himself a link between the Beat Generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. Kesey was born in La Junta, Colorado
La Junta, Colorado
and grew up in Springfield, Oregon, graduating from the University of Oregon
University of Oregon
in 1957. He began writing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in 1960 following the completion of a graduate fellowship in creative writing at Stanford University; the novel was an immediate commercial and critical success when published two years later
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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San Francisco Institute Of Architecture
The San Francisco Institute of Architecture (SFIA) was founded in 1990 by Fred A. Stitt, architect, as a school devoted to innovation in design and experimental research and reform in architectural education. Its goal: to offer a new kind of architectural education, grounded in nature-based architecture and sustainable design. The school was co founded by Lou Marines, former CEO of the national American Institute of Architects. A year later Marines left SFIA to pursue independent continuing education professional development programs. Prior to SFIA, Fred Stitt taught for three years at UC Berkeley, where he studied and documented problems and potential reforms in architectural education. He previously conducted the same kind of research on all aspects of architectural practice at various architecture firms. The results were presented over time in 18 books authored by Stitt and published by McGraw-Hill, John Wiley & Sons, and others
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Sonoma State University
Sonoma State University
University
(SSU, Sonoma State, and Sonoma) is a public comprehensive university, part of the 23-campus California
California
State University
University
(CSU) system. The main campus is located east of Rohnert Park, and north of Cotati, California, United States, approximately 10 miles (16 km) south of Santa Rosa and 50 miles (80 km) north of San Francisco. The university is one of the smallest of the 23 CSU campuses in California
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Ultraviolet
Ultraviolet
Ultraviolet
(UV) is an electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength from 100 nm to 400 nm, shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays. UV radiation is present in sunlight constituting about 10% of the total light output of the Sun. It is also produced by electric arcs and specialized lights, such as mercury-vapor lamps, tanning lamps, and black lights. Although long-wavelength ultraviolet is not considered an ionizing radiation because its photons lack the energy to ionize atoms, it can cause chemical reactions and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Consequently, the chemical and biological effects of UV are greater than simple heating effects, and many practical applications of UV radiation derive from its interactions with organic molecules. Suntan and sunburn are familiar effects of over-exposure of the skin to UV, along with higher risk of skin cancer
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Vinyl Chloride
Vinyl chloride
Vinyl chloride
is an organochloride with the formula H2C=CHCl that is also called vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) or chloroethene. This colorless compound is an important industrial chemical chiefly used to produce the polymer polyvinyl chloride (PVC).[2] About 13 billion kilograms are produced annually. VCM is among the top twenty largest petrochemicals (petroleum-derived chemicals) in world production. The United States currently remains the largest VCM manufacturing region because of its low-production-cost position in chlorine and ethylene raw materials. China is also a large manufacturer and one of the largest consumers of VCM.[3] Vinyl chloride
Vinyl chloride
is a gas with a sweet odor. It is highly toxic, flammable, and carcinogenic. It can be formed in the environment when soil organisms break down "chlorinated" solvents
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Polyvinyl Chloride
Polyvinyl chloride
Polyvinyl chloride
(/ˌpɒlivaɪnəl ˈklɔːraɪd/),[5] also known as polyvinyl or vinyl,[6] commonly abbreviated PVC, is the world's third-most widely produced synthetic plastic polymer, after polyethylene and polypropylene.[7] PVC comes in two basic forms: rigid (sometimes abbreviated as RPVC) and flexible. The rigid form of PVC is used in construction for pipe and in profile applications such as doors and windows. It is also used in making bottles, non-food packaging, and cards (such as bank or membership cards). It can be made softer and more flexible by the addition of plasticizers, the most widely used being phthalates. In this form, it is also used in plumbing, electrical cable insulation, imitation leather, signage, phonograph records,[8] inflatable products, and many applications where it replaces rubber.[9] Pure polyvinyl chloride is a white, brittle solid
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Argon
Argon
Argon
is a chemical element with symbol Ar and atomic number 18. It is in group 18 of the periodic table and is a noble gas.[6] Argon
Argon
is the third-most abundant gas in the Earth's atmosphere, at 0.934% (9340 ppmv). It is more than twice as abundant as water vapor (which averages about 4000 ppmv, but varies greatly), 23 times as abundant as carbon dioxide (400 ppmv), and more than 500 times as abundant as neon (18 ppmv)
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Integrated Circuit
An integrated circuit or monolithic integrated circuit (also referred to as an IC, a chip, or a microchip) is a set of electronic circuits on one small flat piece (or "chip") of semiconductor material, normally silicon. The integration of large numbers of tiny transistors into a small chip results in circuits that are orders of magnitude smaller, cheaper, and faster than those constructed of discrete electronic components. The IC's mass production capability, reliability and building-block approach to circuit design has ensured the rapid adoption of standardized ICs in place of designs using discrete transistors. ICs are now used in virtually all electronic equipment and have revolutionized the world of electronics
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Technology
Technology
Technology
("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia[2]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology
Technology
can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings. The simplest form of technology is the development and use of basic tools. The prehistoric discovery of how to control fire and the later Neolithic Revolution
Neolithic Revolution
increased the available sources of food, and the invention of the wheel helped humans to travel in and control their environment
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Hypercar (concept Car)
The Hypercar is a design concept car developed by energy analyst Amory Lovins at the Rocky Mountain Institute. This vehicle would have ultra-light construction with an aerodynamic body using advanced composite materials, low-drag design, and hybrid drive.[1] Designers of the Hypercar claim that it would achieve a three- to five-fold improvement in fuel economy, equal or better performance, safety, amenity, and affordability, compared with today's cars.[2]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] In 1994, the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) founded the Hypercar Center to help prove its technical feasibility and commercial reality. The concept was placed in the public domain to maximize competition in capturing its market and manufacturing advantages
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