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Jōkyū War
Jōkyū
Jōkyū
War (承久の乱, jōkyū no ran), also known as the Jōkyū Disturbance or the Jōkyū
Jōkyū
Rebellion,[1] was fought in Japan
Japan
between the forces of Retired Emperor Go-Toba
Emperor Go-Toba
and those of the Hōjō clan, regents of the Kamakura shogunate, whom the retired emperor was trying to overthrow. The main battle was at Uji, just outside Kyōto; this was the third battle to be fought there in less than half a century
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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Shōgun
A shōgun (将軍, [ɕoːɡɯɴ] ( listen)) was the military dictator of Japan
Japan
during the period from 1185 to 1868 (with exceptions). In most of this period, the shōguns were the de facto rulers of the country, although nominally they were appointed by the Emperor as a ceremonial formality.[1] The shōguns held almost absolute power over territories through military means
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Military History Of Japan
The military history of Japan
Japan
is characterized by a period of clan warfare that lasted until the 12th century AD. This was followed by feudal wars that culminated in military governments known as the "Shogunate". Feudal
Feudal
militarism transitioned to imperial militarism in the 19th century after the landings of Admiral Perry and the elevation of the Meiji Emperor. This led to rampant imperialism until Japan's defeat by the Allies in World War
War
II
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List Of Wars
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to war: War – organised and often prolonged armed conflict that is carried out by states and/or non-state actors – is characterised by extreme violence, social disruption, and economic destruction.[1][2] War should be understood as an actual, intentional and widespread armed conflict between political communities, and therefore is defined as a form of political violence or intervention.[1][3] Warfare – refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general.[4] An absence of war is peace.Contents1 Types of war1.1 Types of warfare1.1.1 Warfare by objective 1.1.2 Warfare by strategic doctrine 1.1.3 Warfare by terrain 1.1.4 Warfare by equipment or weapon type 1.1.5 Warfare by era 1.1.6 Warfare by stages 1.1.7 Other2 History of war2.1 Warfare by era 2.2 Wars2.2.1 Wars by death toll 2.2.2 Wars by date 2.2.3 Wars by region 2.2.4 Wars
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Richard Ponsonby-Fane
Richard Arthur Brabazon Ponsonby-Fane (8 January 1878 – 10 December 1937) was a British academic, author, and Japanologist.Contents1 Early years 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 Honours 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesEarly years[edit]A view of the Ponsonby-Fane family home, Brympton d'Evercy, in Somerset.Richard Arthur Brabazon Ponsonby was born at Gravesend on the south bank of the Thames in Kent, England. His boyhood was spent in the family home in London and at his grandfather's Somerset country home, Brympton d'Evercy[1] which he inherited after the deaths of both his grandfather and father. He added "Fane" to his name when Brympton devolved to him in 1916.[2] Ponsonby was educated at Harrow School.[3] Career[edit] In 1896, Ponsonby traveled to Cape Town
Cape Town
to serve as Private Secretary to the Governor of the British Cape Colony.[4] For the next two decades, his career in the British Empire's colonial governments spanned the globe
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Tosa Province
Tosa Province
Tosa Province
(土佐国, Tosa no kuni) is a former province of Japan in the area that is today Kōchi Prefecture
Kōchi Prefecture
on Shikoku.[1] Tosa was bordered by Iyo and Awa Provinces. It was sometimes called Doshū (土州) .Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The ancient capital was near modern Nankoku. Tosa jinja
Tosa jinja
was designated as the chief Shinto shrine (ichinomiya) for the province. [2] Tosa was ruled by the Chōsokabe clan
Chōsokabe clan
during the Sengoku period, and Chōsokabe Motochika
Chōsokabe Motochika
briefly unified Shikoku
Shikoku
under his rule, although he was reduced to Tosa again by Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
and dispossessed entirely after Sekigahara. The province was then granted to Yamauchi Kazutoyo
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Emperor Tsuchimikado
Emperor
Emperor
Tsuchimikado (土御門天皇, Tsuchimikado-tennō, January 3, 1196 – November 6, 1231) was the 83rd emperor of Japan,[1] according to the traditional order of succession.[2] Tsuchimikado's reign spanned the years from 1198 through 1210.[3]Contents1 Genealogy 2 Events of Tsuchimikado's life2.1 Kugyō3 Eras of Tsuchimikado's reign 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesGenealogy[edit] Before Tsuchimikado's ascension to the Chrysanthemum
Chrysanthemum
Throne, his personal name (imina) was Tamehito-shinnō (為仁親王).[4] He was the firstborn son of Emperor
Emperor
Go-Toba. His mother was Ariko (在子) (1171–1257), daughter of Minamoto no Michichika
Minamoto no Michichika
(源通親). Tsuchimikado's Imperial family lived with him in the Dairi of the Heian Palace
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Oki Islands
Oki Islands
Oki Islands
(隠岐諸島, Oki-shotō, or 隠岐の島 Oki-no-shima, 隠岐群島 Oki-guntō) is an archipelago in the Sea of Japan, the islands of which are administratively part of Oki District, Shimane Prefecture, Japan. The islands have a total area of 346.1 square kilometres (133.6 sq mi). Only four of the sixteen named islands are permanently inhabited. Much of the archipelago is within the borders of Daisen-Oki National Park. Due to their geological heritage, the Oki Islands
Oki Islands
were designated a UNESCO Global Geopark in September 2014.[1]Contents1 Geology 2 Climate 3 History 4 Administration 5 Transportation 6 Main islands 7 References 8 External linksGeology[edit]Sekiheki volcanic cliff, Chiburijima.Dozen Caldera
Caldera
seen from Mt
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Hayato Rebellion
The Hayato rebellion (隼人の反乱, Hayato no hanran) (720–721) was a rebellion of the Hayato people of southern Kyushu against the state of Japan. After a year and a half of fighting, the Hayato were defeated, and the Japanese court established its rule over southern Kyushu. Background[edit] In the latter half of the 7th century, the Yamato court's influence extended to southern Kyushu, but the scattered Kumaso and Hayato populations held their ground. The court was attempting to introduce its own Ritsuryō system throughout its sphere of influence, but the populations of southern Kyushu resisted. This was because Ritsuryō was based on rice cultivation, to which the volcanic soil of southern Kyushu was unsuited. On the other hand, the court was also expanding its intercourse with mainland China through the Ryukyu Islands
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Tōkaidō (road)
The Tōkaidō road (東海道) was the most important of the Five Routes of the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, connecting Kyoto
Kyoto
to Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo). Unlike the inland and less heavily travelled Nakasendō, the Tōkaidō travelled along the sea coast of eastern Honshū, hence the route's name.[2]Contents1 Travelling the Tōkaidō 2 The Tōkaidō in art and literature 3 Ōsaka Kaidō 4 Modern-day Tōkaidō 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTravelling the Tōkaidō[edit] The standard method of travel was by foot, as wheeled carts were almost nonexistent and heavy cargo was usually sent by boat. Members of the higher class, however, travelled by kago. Women were forbidden to travel alone and had to be accompanied by men
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Mount Hiei
Mount Hiei
Mount Hiei
(比叡山, Hiei-zan) is a mountain to the northeast of Kyoto, lying on the border between the Kyoto
Kyoto
and Shiga Prefectures, Japan. The temple of Enryaku-ji, the first outpost of the Japanese Tendai (Chin. Tiantai) sect of Buddhism, was founded atop Mount Hiei
Mount Hiei
by Saichō
Saichō
in 788
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