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Iximche
Iximche
Iximche
(/iʃimˈtʃe/) (or Iximché using Spanish orthography) is a Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
Mesoamerican archaeological site in the western highlands of Guatemala. Iximche
Iximche
was the capital of the Late Postclassic Kaqchikel Maya kingdom from 1470 until its abandonment in 1524. The architecture of the site included a number of pyramid-temples, palaces and two Mesoamerican ballcourts. Excavators uncovered the poorly preserved remains of painted murals on some of the buildings and ample evidence of human sacrifice. The ruins of Iximche
Iximche
were declared a Guatemalan National Monument in the 1960s.[1] The site has a small museum displaying a number of pieces found there, including sculptures and ceramics
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Maya Astronomy
Maya astronomy
Maya astronomy
is the study of the Moon, planets, Milky Way, Sun, and other astronomical occurrences by the Precolumbian Maya Civilization of Mesoamerica. The Classic Maya in particular developed some of the most accurate pre-telescope astronomy in the world, aided by their fully developed writing system and their positional numeral system, both of which are fully indigenous to Mesoamerica
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Clan
A clan is a group of people united by actual or perceived kinship[1] and descent. Even if lineage details are unknown, clan members may be organized around a founding member or apical ancestor. Clans in indigenous societies tend to be exogamous, meaning that their members cannot marry one another. Clans preceded more centralized forms of community organization and government and are in every country. Members may identify with a coat of arms or other symbol to show they are an independent clan. The kinship-based bonds may be symbolic, whereby the clan shares a "stipulated" common ancestor that is a symbol of the clan's unity. When this "ancestor" is non-human, it is referred to as a totem, which is frequently an animal. The word clan is derived from the Gaelic clann[1] meaning "children" or "progeny"; it is not from the word for "family" in either Irish[2][3] or Scottish Gaelic
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Chimaltenango Department
Chimaltenango
Chimaltenango
is a department of Guatemala. The capital is Chimaltenango. Located to the east are the departments of Guatemala, home to Guatemala
Guatemala
City, and Sacatepéquez, while also bordered by the departments of El Quiché
El Quiché
and Baja Verapaz
Baja Verapaz
to the north, Escuintla
Escuintla
and Suchitepéquez
Suchitepéquez
to the south, and Sololá Department
Sololá Department
to the west. The capital of Chimaltenango
Chimaltenango
is located about 54 kilometers away from Guatemala
Guatemala
City. Population estimate for Chimaltenango
Chimaltenango
Department in 2000 was 448,000 people. The majority of the people in the department are of Cakchiquel Maya descent
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Guatemala City
Guatemala
Guatemala
City (Spanish: Ciudad de Guatemala), locally known as Guatemala
Guatemala
or Guate, is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Guatemala, and the most populous in Central America
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Departments Of Guatemala
Guatemala
Guatemala
is divided into 22 departments (Spanish: departamentos)[1] which are in turn divided into 340[2][3] municipalities. In addition, Guatemala
Guatemala
has previously claimed that all or part of the nation of Belize
Belize
is a department of Guatemala
Guatemala
(as a part of the Province of Verapaz), and this claim is sometimes reflected in maps of the region
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Tz'utujil People
The Tz'utujil (Tzutujil, Tzutuhil, Sutujil) are a Native American people, one of the 21 Maya ethnic groups that dwell in Guatemala. Together with the Xinca, Garífunas
Garífunas
(Black Caribs) and the Ladinos, they make up the 24 ethnic groups in this relatively small country. Approximately 100,000 Tz'utujil live in the area around Lake Atitlán. Their pre-Columbian capital, near Santiago Atitlán, was Chuitinamit. In pre-Columbian times, the Tz'utujil nation was a part of the ancient Maya civilization. The Tz'utujil are noted for their continuing adherence to traditional cultural and religious practices. Evangelical Protestantism and Roman Catholicism are also practiced among them
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Madre Vieja River
The Río Madre Vieja (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmaðɾe ˈβjexa]) is a river in southwest Guatemala. Its sources are located in the Sierra Madre range, on the border of the departments El Quiché, Sololá, and Chimaltenango. It flows southwards through the coastal lowlands of Suchitepéquez and Escuintla to the Pacific Ocean.[1] The Madre Vieja river basin covers a territory of 1,007 square kilometres (389 sq mi).[2] References[edit]^ INSIVUMEH. "Mapa de Cuencas y Ríos".  ^ INSIVUMEH. "Principales ríos de Guatemala". This article related to a river in Guatemala is a stub
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Central American Pine-oak Forests
The Central American pine-oak forests
Central American pine-oak forests
ecoregion, in the tropical and subtropical coniferous forests biome, is found in Central America
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Maya Peoples
The Maya people are a group of Indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica. They inhabit southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador
El Salvador
and Honduras. The overarching term "Maya" is a collective designation to include the peoples of the region that share some degree of cultural and linguistic heritage; however, the term embraces many distinct populations, societies, and ethnic groups that each have their own particular traditions, cultures, and historical identity. The pre-Columbian Maya population was approximately eight million.[citation needed] There were an estimated seven million Maya living in this area at the start of the 21st century.[1][2] Guatemala, southern Mexico
Mexico
and the Yucatán Peninsula, Belize, El Salvador, and western Honduras
Honduras
have managed to maintain numerous remnants of their ancient cultural heritage
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Guatemalan Civil War
Guatemala
Guatemala
borderFranja Transversal del Norte[7]Belligerents URNG
URNG
(from 1982) PGT (until 1998) MR-13 (1960–1971) FAR (1960–1971) EGP (1971–1996) ORPA (1979–1996)Support
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Maya Society
Maya society
Maya society
concerns the social organization of the Pre-Hispanic Mayas, its political structures and social classes.Contents1 Kingdom, Court, and Royal 2 Social classes2.1 Scribes3 Kinship 4 Body modifications4.1 Cranium Modifications4.1.1 Modification Differences 4.1.2 Evidence of Artificially Deformed Craniums 4.1.3 Why was the head the center of modification? 4.1.4 Significance of Cranium Modification4.2 Dental Modification4.2.1 Evidence of Artificially Deformed Teeth 4.2.2 Significance of Dental Modification4.3 Tattoos, Scarification, and Body Paint4.3.1 Body P
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Mayan Languages
The Mayan languages[notes 1] form a language family spoken in Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
and northern Central America. Mayan languages
Mayan languages
are spoken by at least 6 million Maya peoples, primarily in Guatemala, Mexico, Belize
Belize
and Honduras
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Maya Script
Mayan script, also known as Mayan glyphs, was the writing system of the Maya civilization
Maya civilization
of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
and is the only Mesoamerican writing system that has been substantially deciphered. The earliest inscriptions found which are identifiably Maya date to the 3rd century BCE in San Bartolo, Guatemala.[1][2] Maya writing was in continuous use throughout Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
until the Spanish conquest of the Maya
Spanish conquest of the Maya
in the 16th and 17th centuries. Maya writing used logograms complemented with a set of syllabic glyphs, somewhat similar in function to modern Japanese writing
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Maya Religion
The traditional Maya religion
Maya religion
of Guatemala, Belize, western Honduras, and the Tabasco , Chiapas, and Yucatán regions of Mexico is a southeastern variant of Mesoamerican religion. As is the case with many other contemporary Mesoamerican religions, it results from centuries of symbiosis with Roman Catholicism. When its pre-Spanish antecedents are taken into account, however, traditional Maya religion already exists for more than two millennia as a recognizably distinct phenomenon. Before the advent of Christianity, it was spread over many indigenous kingdoms, with all their own local traditions
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Maya Mythology
Maya mythology
Maya mythology
is part of Mesoamerican mythology and comprises all of the Maya tales in which personified forces of nature, deities, and the heroes interacting with these play the main roles. Other parts of Maya oral tradition (such as animal tales and many moralising stories) do not properly belong to the domain of mythology, but rather to legend and folk tale.Contents1 Sources 2 Important mythical themes2.1 Creation and end of the world 2.2 The Corn Men 2.3 Actions of the heroes: Arranging the world 2.4 Marriage with the Earth 2.5 Origin of Sun and Moon3 Reconstructing pre-Spanish mythology 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Bibliography and references 7 External linksSources[edit] The oldest written Maya myths date from the 16th century and are found in historical sources from the Guatemalan Highlands
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