HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Italianate-style
The ITALIANATE STYLE OF ARCHITECTURE was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture
Classical architecture
. In the Italianate style, the models and architectural vocabulary of 16th-century Italian Renaissance architecture , which had served as inspiration for both Palladianism and Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
, were synthesised with picturesque aesthetics. The style of architecture that was thus created, though also characterised as " Neo-Renaissance
Neo-Renaissance
", was essentially of its own time
[...More...]

"Italianate-style" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Eastlake
CHARLES LOCKE EASTLAKE (11 March 1836 – 20 November 1906) was a British architect and furniture designer . Eastlake was born in Plymouth
Plymouth
. Trained by the architect Philip Hardwick (1792–1870), he popularized William Morris
William Morris
's notions of decorative arts in the Arts and Crafts style , becoming one of the principal exponents of the revived Early English or Modern Gothic style popular during the nineteenth century. He did not make any furniture; his designs were produced by professional cabinet makers . The style of furniture named after him, Eastlake style , flourished during the later half of the nineteenth century. A style of architecture, with old English and Gothic elements, is also named for him. In 1868 he published Hints on Household Taste in Furniture, Upholstery and other Details, which was very influential in Britain, and later in the United States, where the book was published in 1872
[...More...]

"Charles Eastlake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Government House, Melbourne
GOVERNMENT HOUSE, MELBOURNE is the office and official residence of the Governor of Victoria . The current Governor of Victoria is Her Excellency The Honourable Linda Dessau AC. The House is set next to the Royal Botanic Gardens and surrounded by Kings Domain in Melbourne . It was the official residence of the Governor-General of Australia from 1901 to 1930. It is the largest Government House in the former British Empire and is almost double the size of the Viceregal Lodge , the former residence of the Lords-Lieutenant of Ireland . Tours of the House and Gardens are available. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Building design * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYThe land for Government House was set aside by Lieutenant-Governor of Victoria , Charles La Trobe , in 1841. In 1857, Ferdinand von Mueller , Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens , landscaped the whole area, including Government House reserve, as one parkland
[...More...]

"Government House, Melbourne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cliveden
CLIVEDEN HOUSE (pronounced /ˈklɪvdən/ ) is an Italianate mansion and estate in Buckinghamshire , on the border with Berkshire
Berkshire
. It crowns an outlying ridge of the Chiltern Hills by the hilltop village of Taplow , just 2 miles (3.2 km) from the riverside town of Maidenhead
Maidenhead
. Set on banks 40 metres (130 ft) above the River Thames
River Thames
, its grounds slope down to the river. The site has been home to an earl, three countesses, two dukes, a Prince of Wales and the Viscounts Astor . As home of Nancy Astor
Nancy Astor
, the house was the meeting place of the Cliveden set of the 1920s and '30s — a group of political intellectuals. Later, during the 1960s, it became the setting for key events of the notorious Profumo Affair
[...More...]

"Cliveden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mansion
A MANSION is a large dwelling house . It must be at least 5000 square feet and on average most are around 8-10 thousand square feet. The word itself derives through Old French
Old French
from the Latin word mansio "dwelling", an abstract noun derived from the verb manere "to dwell". The English word "manse " originally defined a property large enough for the parish priest to maintain himself, but a mansion is no longer self-sustaining in this way (compare a Roman or medieval villa ). 'Manor ' comes from the same root—territorial holdings granted to a lord who would remain there—hence it is easy to see how the word 'Mansion' came to have its meaning. In modern Japan, a "manshon" (マンション), stemming from the English word "mansion", is used to refer to a multi-unit apartment complex
[...More...]

"Mansion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Villa Emo
VILLA EMO is a patrician villa in the Veneto
Veneto
, northern Italy
Italy
, near the village of Fanzolo di Vedelago . It was designed by Andrea Palladio in 1559 for the Emo family of Venice
Venice
and remained in the hands of the Emo family until it was sold in 2004. Since 1996, it has been conserved as part of the World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
"City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto
Veneto
". CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Architectural details * 3 Frescoes * 4 Media interest * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links HISTORYThe building of Villa
Villa
Emo was the culmination of a long-lasting project of the patrician Emo family of the Republic of Venice
Venice
to develop its estates at Fanzolo
[...More...]

"Villa Emo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Balustrade
A BALUSTER— also called SPINDLE or STAIR STICK—is a moulded shaft, square or of lathe -turned form, a form cut from a rectangular or square plank, one of various forms of spindle in woodwork , made of stone or wood and sometimes of metal, standing on a unifying footing, and supporting the coping of a parapet or the handrail of a staircase . Multiplied in this way, they form a BALUSTRADE. Individually, a BALUSTER SHAFT may describe the turned form taken by a brass or silver candlestick, an upright furniture support, or the stem of a brass chandelier, etc
[...More...]

"Balustrade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wrought-iron
WROUGHT IRON is an iron alloy with a very low carbon (less than 0.08%) content in contrast to cast iron (2.1% to 4%). It is a semi-fused mass of iron with fibrous slag inclusions (up to 2% by weight) which gives it a "grain" resembling wood, that is visible when it is etched or bent to the point of failure. Wrought iron
Wrought iron
is tough, malleable, ductile, corrosion-resistant and easily welded . Before the development of effective methods of steelmaking and the availability of large quantities of steel, wrought iron was the most common form of malleable iron. A wrought product is one that has been mechanically worked by forging, extruding, rolling, hammering, et cetera, to change its form and properties. Wrought iron
Wrought iron
is a particular worked iron product that is seldom produced today as other cheaper, superior products have substituted
[...More...]

"Wrought-iron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Machicolation
A MACHICOLATION (French : mâchicoulis) is a floor opening between the supporting corbels of a battlement , through which stones or other material, such as boiling water or boiling cooking oil, could be dropped on attackers at the base of a defensive wall . A smaller version found on smaller structures is called a BOX-MACHICOLATION. CONTENTS * 1 Terminology * 2 Description and use * 3 Post-medieval use * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 Bibliography * 8 External links TERMINOLOGY THIS SECTION NEEDS EXPANSION with: explanations for the inclusion of other European terma in the introduction: German: maschikuli. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Machicolation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cupola
In architecture , a CUPOLA /ˈkjuːpələ/ is a small, most often dome -like, structure on top of a building. Often used to provide a lookout or to admit light and air, it usually crowns a larger roof or dome. The word derives, via Italian , from the lower Latin cupula (classical Latin cupella from the Greek κύπελλον kupellon) "small cup" (Latin cupa) indicating a vault resembling an upside down cup. The cupola is a development during the Renaissance of the oculus , an ancient device found in Roman architecture, but being weatherproof was superior for the wetter climates of northern Europe. The chhatri , seen in Indian architecture , fits the definition of a cupola when it is used atop a larger structure. Cupolas often appear as small buildings in their own right. They often serve as a belfry , belvedere , or roof lantern above a main roof. In other cases they may crown a spire , tower , or turret . Barns often have cupolas for ventilation
[...More...]

"Cupola" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quoin (architecture)
QUOINS (/kɔɪn/ or /kwɔɪn/ ) are masonry blocks at the corner of a wall. They exist in some cases to provide actual strength for a wall made with inferior stone or rubble and in other cases to make a feature of a corner, creating an impression of permanence and strength, and reinforcing the onlooker’s sense of a structure’s presence. Stone quoins are used on stone or brick buildings. Brick
Brick
quoins may appear on brick buildings that extrude from the facing brickwork in such a way as to give the appearance of uniformly cut blocks of stone larger than the bricks. Where quoins are used for decoration and not for load-bearing, they may be made from a wider variety of materials beyond brick, stone or concrete, extending to timber , cement render or other stucco
[...More...]

"Quoin (architecture)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Loggia
A LOGGIA ( /ˈlɒdʒiə/ or /ˈloʊdʒə/ ; Italian: ) is an architectural feature which is a covered exterior gallery or corridor usually on an upper level, or sometimes ground level. The outer wall is open to the elements, usually supported by a series of columns or arches . Loggias can be located either on the front or side of a building and are not meant for entrance but as an out-of-door sitting room. From the early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
, nearly every Italian comune had an open arched loggia in its main square which served as a "symbol of communal justice and government and as a stage for civic ceremony". CONTENTS* 1 Definition of the Roman loggia * 1.1 Examples * 2 See also * 3 Notes * 4 References * 5 External links DEFINITION OF THE ROMAN LOGGIAThe main difference between a loggia and a portico is the role within the functional layout of the building
[...More...]

"Loggia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Palladio
ANDREA PALLADIO (Italian pronunciation: ; 30 November 1508 – 19 August 1580) was an Italian architect active in the Republic of Venice
Venice
. Palladio, influenced by Roman and Greek architecture , primarily by Vitruvius
Vitruvius
, is widely considered to be the most influential individual in the history of architecture . All of his buildings are located in what was the Venetian Republic, but his teachings, summarized in the architectural treatise, The Four Books of Architecture , gained him wide recognition. The city of Vicenza
Vicenza
and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto are UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Sites
World Heritage Sites

[...More...]

"Palladio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sandridge Park
SANDRIDGE PARK, near Stoke Gabriel , Devon , is an English country house in the Italianate style , designed by John Nash around 1805 for the Dowager Lady Ashburton, née Elizabeth Baring, the wife of John Dunning, 1st Baron Ashburton . It is a Grade II* listed building . It is considered to be a late intimation of Nash's development of the Italianate style . Commissioned by the dowager Lady Ashburton as a country retreat, this small country house clearly shows the transition between the picturesque of William Gilpin and Nash's yet to be fully evolved Italianism
[...More...]

"Sandridge Park" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Houses Of Parliament
The PALACE OF WESTMINSTER is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords
House of Lords
, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom . Commonly known as the HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
, in central London
London
. Its name, which is derived from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex destroyed by fire in 1834 , and its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. The palace is owned by the monarch in right of the Crown and for ceremonial purposes, retains its original status as a royal residence
[...More...]

"Houses Of Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gothic Architecture
GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE is a style of architecture that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages
Late Middle Ages
. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture . Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance
Renaissance
. Its characteristics include the pointed arch , the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress . Gothic architecture is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals , abbeys and churches of Europe
[...More...]

"Gothic Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.