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Isosorbide Mononitrate
Isosorbide mononitrate
Isosorbide mononitrate
is a drug used principally in the treatment of angina pectoris[1] and acts by dilating the blood vessels so as to reduce the blood pressure. It is sold in the USA by Kremers Urban under the trade name Monoket, also sold in the USA under the name Imdur, and marketed in the UK under the trade names: Isotard, Monosorb, Chemydur. In India, this drug is available under the brand names of Ismo, Isonorm, Monotrate, Solotrate, and Monit. In Russia
Russia
it is occasionally used under the brand names Monocinque and Pektrol.Contents1 Medical uses 2 Adverse effects 3 Interactions 4 ReferencesMedical uses[edit] Isosorbide mononitrate
Isosorbide mononitrate
is a nitrate-class drug used for the prophylactic treatment of angina pectoris; that is, it is taken in order to prevent or at least reduce the occurrence of angina
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American Society Of Health-System Pharmacists
The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
Pharmacists
(ASHP) is a professional organization representing the interests of pharmacists who practice in hospitals, health maintenance organizations, long-term care facilities, home care, and other components of health care. Previously it was known as the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. As of 2018[update], ASHP has 45,000 members and a staff of more than 200.Contents1 History 2 Aim 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] By 1939 a subsection of hospital pharmacists was formed in the American Pharmaceutical Association (APhA), and for the first time, hospital pharmacists had a voice in a national organization. In 1942, hospital pharmacists established the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists, affiliated with APhA
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Methionine
Methionine
Methionine
(symbol Met or M[3]) (/mɪˈθaɪəniːn/)[4] is an essential amino acid in humans. Methionine
Methionine
is important in angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, and supplementation may benefit those suffering from copper poisoning
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Blood Vessel
The blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system, and microcirculation, that transports blood throughout the human body.[1] There are three major types of blood vessels: the arteries, which carry the blood away from the heart; the capillaries, which enable the actual exchange of water and chemicals between the blood and the tissues; and the veins, which carry blood from the capillaries back toward the heart. The word vascular, meaning relating to the blood vessels, is derived from the Latin
Latin
vas, meaning vessel. A few structures (such as cartilage and the lens of the eye) do not contain blood vessels and are labeled.Contents1 Structure1.1 Types2 Function2.1 Vessel size 2.2 Blood
Blood
flow3 Disease 4 ReferencesStructure[edit] The arteries and veins have three layers. The middle layer is thicker in the arteries than it is in the veins:The inner layer, Tunica intima, is the thinnest layer
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Blood Pressure
Blood
Blood
pressure (BP) is the pressure of circulating blood on the walls of blood vessels. Used without further specification, "blood pressure" usually refers to the pressure in large arteries of the systemic circulation. Blood
Blood
pressure is usually expressed in terms of the systolic pressure (maximum during one heart beat) over diastolic pressure (minimum in between two heart beats) and is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg), above the surrounding atmospheric pressure (considered to be zero for convenience). Blood
Blood
pressure is one of the vital signs, along with respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and body temperature
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Russia
Coordinates: 60°N 90°E / 60°N 90°E / 60; 90Russian Federation Росси́йская Федерaция (Russian) Rossiyskaya FederatsiyaFlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Gosudarstvenny gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii"  (transliteration) "State Anthem of the Russian Federation"Location of Russia
Russia
(green) Russian-administered Crimea
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Hypotension
Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the systemic circulation.[1] Blood pressure
Blood pressure
is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood. A systolic blood pressure of less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or diastolic of less than 60 mm Hg is generally considered to be hypotension.[2][3] However, in practice, blood pressure is considered too low only if noticeable symptoms are present.[4] Hypotension is the opposite of hypertension, which is high blood pressure. It is best understood as a physiological state, rather than a disease
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Tachycardia
Tachycardia, also called tachyarrhythmia, is a heart rate that exceeds the normal resting rate.[1] In general, a resting heart rate over 100 beats per minute is accepted as tachycardia in adults.[1] Heart rates above the resting rate may be normal (such as with exercise) or abnormal (such as with electrical problems within the heart).Contents1 Definition 2 Causes 3 Differential diagnosis3.1 Sinus 3.2 Ventricular 3.3 Supraventricular3.3.1 Atrial fibrillation 3.3.2 AV nodal reentrant tachycardia 3.3.3 AV reentrant tachycardia 3.3.4 Junctional tachycardia4 Management4.1 Unstable5 Terminology 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] The upper threshold of a normal human resting heart rate is based on age
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Vertigo (medical)
Vertigo is a medical condition where a person feels as if they or the objects around them are moving when they are not.[1] Often it feels like a spinning or swaying movement.[1][2] This may be associated with nausea, vomiting, sweating, or difficulties walking.[2] It is typically worsened when the head is moved.[2] Vertigo is the most common type of dizziness.[2] The most common diseases that result in vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Ménière's disease, and labyrinthitis.[1][2] Less common causes include stroke, brain tumors, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, migraines, trauma, and uneven pressures between the middle ears.[2][4][5
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Syncope (medicine)
Syncope, also known as fainting, is a loss of consciousness and muscle strength characterized by a fast onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery.[1] It is caused by a decrease in blood flow to the brain, usually from low blood pressure.[1] There are sometimes symptoms before the loss of consciousness such as lightheadedness, sweating, pale skin, blurred vision, nausea, vomiting, or feeling warm
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Myocardial Infarction
Myocardial infarction
Myocardial infarction
(MI), commonly known as a heart attack, occurs when blood flow decreases or stops to a part of the heart, causing damage to the heart muscle.[1] The most common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw.[1] Often it occurs in the center or left side of the chest and lasts for more than a few minutes.[1] The discomfort may occasionally feel like heartburn.[1] Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, nausea, feeling faint, a cold sweat, or feeling tired.[1] About 30% of people have atypical symptoms.[7] Women more ofte
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N-acetylcysteine
Acetylcysteine, also known as N-acetylcysteine (NAC), is a medication that is used for the treatment of paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose and to loosen thick mucus in individuals with cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[1] It can be taken intravenously, by mouth, or inhaled as a mist.[1] Some people use it as a dietary supplement.[6][7] Common side effects include nausea and vomiting when taken by mouth.[1] The skin may occasionally become red and itchy with either form.[1] A non-immune type of anaphylaxis may also occur.[1] It appears to be safe in pregnancy.[1] It works by increasing glutathione levels and binding with the toxic breakdown products of paracetamol.[1] Acetylcysteine
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Captopril
Captopril, sold under the trade name Capoten, is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used for the treatment of hypertension and some types of congestive heart failure. Captopril
Captopril
was discovered in 1977.[1] It was the first ACE inhibitor developed and was considered a breakthrough both because of its novel mechanism of action and also because of the revolutionary development process.[2] Captopril
Captopril
was discovered and developed at E. R
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Drugs.com
Drugs.com
Drugs.com
is an online pharmaceutical encyclopedia which provides drug information for consumers and healthcare professionals primarily in the USA.Contents1 Website 2 History 3 References 4 External linksWebsite[edit] The Drugs.com
Drugs.com
website is owned and operated by the Drugsite Trust. The Drugsite Trust is a privately held Trust administered by two New Zealand pharmacists, Karen Ann and Phillip James Thornton. [1] The site contains a library of reference information which includes content from Cerner
Cerner
Multum, Micromedex
Micromedex
from Truven Health Analytics, Wolters Kluwer Health, U.S
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Calcium Channel Blocker
Calcium
Calcium
channel blockers (CCB), calcium channel antagonists or calcium antagonists[2] are several medications that disrupt the movement of calcium (Ca2+) through calcium channels.[3] Calcium
Calcium
channel blockers are used as antihypertensive drugs, i.e., as medications to decrease blood pressure in patients with hypertension
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Verapamil
Verapamil, sold under various trade names,[1] is a medication used for the treatment of high blood pressure, chest pain from not enough blood flow to the heart, and supraventricular tachycardia.[2] It may also be used for the prevention of migraines and cluster headaches.[3][4] It is given by mouth or by injection into a vein.[2] Common side effects include headache, low blood pressure, nausea, and constipation.[2] Other side effects include allergic reactions and muscle pains.[5] It is not recommended in people with a slow heart rate or heart failure.[5] It is believed to cause problems for the baby if used during pregnancy.[6] It is in the non–dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker family of medications.[2] Verapamil
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