HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Isoda Koryusai
Isoda Koryūsai
Koryūsai
(礒田 湖龍斎, 1735–1790) was a Japanese ukiyo-e print designer and painter active from 1769 to 1790.Contents1 Life and career 2 Work 3 Legacy 4 References4.1 Works cited5 External linksLife and career[edit] Koryūsai
Koryūsai
was born in 1735 and worked as a samurai in the service of the Tsuchiya clan. He became a masterless rōnin after the death of the head of the clan and moved to Edo
Edo
(modern Tokyo) where he settled near Ryōgoku Bridge in the Yagenbori area. He became a print designer there under the art name Haruhiro in 1769, at first making samurai-themed designs
[...More...]

"Isoda Koryusai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
[...More...]

"Japanese Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e[a] is a genre of Japanese art
Japanese art
which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties; kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers; scenes from history and folk tales; travel scenes and landscapes; flora and fauna; and erotica. The term ukiyo-e (浮世絵) translates as "picture[s] of the floating world". Edo
Edo
(modern Tokyo) became the seat of government for the military dictatorship in the early 17th century. The merchant class at the bottom of the social order benefited most from the city's rapid economic growth. Many indulged in the entertainments of kabuki theatre, courtesans, and geisha of the pleasure districts
[...More...]

"Ukiyo-e" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tsuchiya Clan
Tsuchiya clan
Tsuchiya clan
(土屋氏, Tsuchiya-shi) is a Japanese samurai kin group.[2]Contents1 History 2 Select list 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Tsuchiya claim descent from Minamoto Yasuuji and the Seiwa-Genji. Tsuchiya Tadanao (1585–1612) was made head of the clan in 1602, and he was established as the head of Kururi Domain
Kururi Domain
in Kazusa Province. The clan moved in 1669 to Tsuchiura Domain
Tsuchiura Domain
in Hitachi Province
Hitachi Province
and again in 1681 to Tanaka Domain in Suruga Province. The clan settled from 1688 through 1868 at Tsuchiura (95,000 koku).[2] After the Meiji Restoration, the head of the clan was made a Viscount in the kazoku peerage system.[2] Select list[edit] This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
[...More...]

"Tsuchiya Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rōnin
A rōnin (浪人, "drifter" or "wanderer")[1] was a samurai without lord or master during the feudal period (1185–1868) of Japan. A samurai became masterless from the death or fall of his master, or after the loss of his master's favor or privilege.[2] In modern Japanese usage, the term also describes a salaryman who is unemployed or a secondary school graduate who has not yet been admitted to university.[3][4]Contents1 Etymology 2 Status 3 History 4 Notable rōnin 5 Portrayals in media5.1 Film6 See also 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word rōnin literally means "wave man". It is an idiomatic expression for "vagrant" or "wandering man", someone who is without a home. The term originated in the Nara and Heian periods, when it referred to a serf who had fled or deserted his master's land. It then came to be used for a samurai who had no master
[...More...]

"Rōnin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
[...More...]

"Edo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Suzuki Harunobu
Suzuki Harunobu
Suzuki Harunobu
(Japanese: 鈴木 春信; c. 1725 – 15 July 1770) was a Japanese designer of woodblock print artist in the Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e
style. He was an innovator, the first to produce full-color prints (nishiki-e) in 1765, rendering obsolete the former modes of two- and three-color prints. Harunobu used many special techniques, and depicted a wide variety of subjects, from classical poems to contemporary beauties. Like many artists of his day, Harunobu also produced a number of shunga, or erotic images. During his lifetime and shortly afterwards, many artists imitated his style. A few, such as Harushige, even boasted of their ability to forge the work of the great master
[...More...]

"Suzuki Harunobu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Shunga (art)
Shunga
Shunga
(春画) is a Japanese term for erotic art. Most shunga are a type of ukiyo-e, usually executed in woodblock print format. While rare, there are extant erotic painted handscrolls which predate ukiyo-e.[1] Translated literally, the Japanese word shunga means picture of spring; "spring" is a common euphemism for sex. The ukiyo-e movement as a whole sought to express an idealisation of contemporary urban life and appeal to the new chōnin class. Following the aesthetics of everyday life, Edo-period shunga varied widely in its depictions of sexuality. As a subset of ukiyo-e it was enjoyed by all social groups in the Edo
Edo
period, despite being out of favour with the shogunate
[...More...]

"Shunga (art)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nikuhitsu-ga
Nikuhitsu-ga
Nikuhitsu-ga
(肉筆画) is a form of Japanese painting
Japanese painting
in the ukiyo-e art style. The woodblock prints of this genre have become so famous in the West as to become almost synonymous with the term "ukiyo-e", but most ukiyo-e artists were painters as well as printmakers, with much the same style and subjects
[...More...]

"Nikuhitsu-ga" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Torii Kiyonaga
This article is about the ukiyo-e artist; for samurai named Kiyonaga, see Naito Kiyonaga and Koriki Kiyonaga. In this Japanese name, the family name is Torii. Torii Kiyonaga
Torii Kiyonaga
(Japanese: 鳥居 清長; 1752 – June 28, 1815) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist of the Torii school. Originally Sekiguchi Shinsuke, the son of an Edo
Edo
bookseller, he took on Torii Kiyonaga as an art name. Although not biologically related to the Torii family, he became head of the group after the death of his adoptive father and teacher Torii Kiyomitsu. The master Kiyomitsu died in 1785; since his son died young, and Kiyotsune, Kiyonaga's senior, was a less promising artist, Kiyonaga was the obvious choice to succeed Kiyomitsu to leadership of the Torii school
[...More...]

"Torii Kiyonaga" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Woldemar Von Seidlitz
Woldemar von Seidlitz
Woldemar von Seidlitz
(1 June 1850, in St Petersburg
St Petersburg
– 12 January 1922, in Dresden) was a Russian-born German art historian. He studied economics at the universities of Dorpat and Heidelberg, followed by studies of art history at Leipzig as a pupil of Anton Springer
[...More...]

"Woldemar Von Seidlitz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

University Of Washington Press
The University of Washington
University of Washington
Press is an American academic publishing house. The organization is a division of the University of Washington, based in Seattle. Although the division functions autonomously, they have worked to assist the University's efforts in support of the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, and the Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education. Since 1915, they have published the works of first-time writers, including students, poets, and artists, along with authors known throughout the world for their work in the humanities, arts, and sciences. While the day-to-day functions of the organization are carried out independent of the university, the imprint itself is managed by a committee of faculty members, who have been appointed by the university president
[...More...]

"University Of Washington Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Koryūsai
Isoda Koryūsai
Koryūsai
(礒田 湖龍斎, 1735–1790) was a Japanese ukiyo-e print designer and painter active from 1769 to 1790.Contents1 Life and career 2 Work 3 Legacy 4 References4.1 Works cited5 External linksLife and career[edit] Koryūsai
Koryūsai
was born in 1735 and worked as a samurai in the service of the Tsuchiya clan. He became a masterless rōnin after the death of the head of the clan and moved to Edo
Edo
(modern Tokyo) where he settled near Ryōgoku Bridge in the Yagenbori area. He became a print designer there under the art name Haruhiro in 1769, at first making samurai-themed designs
[...More...]

"Koryūsai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.