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Island Of The Blue Dolphins
Island of the Blue Dolphins
Island of the Blue Dolphins
is a 1960 children's novel written by Scott O'Dell and tells the story of a 12-year-old girl stranded alone for years on an island off the California
California
coast. It is based on the true story of a Nicoleño Native American left alone for 18 years on San Nicolas Island
San Nicolas Island
during the 19th century. Island of the Blue Dolphins
Island of the Blue Dolphins
won the Newbery Medal
Newbery Medal
in 1961.[1] It was adapted into a film of the same name in 1964
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Sea Otter
The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a marine mammal native to the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (31 and 99 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals. Unlike most marine mammals, the sea otter's primary form of insulation is an exceptionally thick coat of fur, the densest in the animal kingdom. Although it can walk on land, the sea otter is capable of living exclusively in the ocean. The sea otter inhabits nearshore environments, where it dives to the sea floor to forage. It preys mostly on marine invertebrates such as sea urchins, various molluscs and crustaceans, and some species of fish. Its foraging and eating habits are noteworthy in several respects. First, its use of rocks to dislodge prey and to open shells makes it one of the few mammal species to use tools
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Spear
A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of wood, with a pointed head. The head may be simply the sharpened end of the shaft itself, as is the case with fire hardened spears, or it may be made of a more durable material fastened to the shaft, such as flint, obsidian, iron, steel or bronze. The most common design for hunting or combat spears since ancient times has incorporated a metal spearhead shaped like a triangle, lozenge, or leaf. The heads of fishing spears usually feature barbs or serrated edges. The word spear comes from the Old English spere, from the Proto-Germanic speri, from a Proto-Indo-European root *sper- "spear, pole". Spears can be divided into two broad categories: those designed for thrusting in melee combat and those designed for throwing (usually referred to as javelins). The spear has been used throughout human history both as a hunting and fishing tool and as a weapon
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Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Awards are accolades bestowed by the 93 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association
Hollywood Foreign Press Association
beginning in January 1944, recognizing excellence in film and television, both domestic and foreign. The annual ceremony at which the awards are presented is a major part of the film industry's awards season, which culminates each year in the Academy Awards.[1] The eligibility period for the Golden Globes corresponds to the calendar year (i.e. January 1 through December 31). The most recent ceremony, the 75th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television in 2017, was held on January 7, 2018
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Jon M. Erlandson
Jon M. Erlandson is an archaeologist and Philip H. Knight Professor of Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon, and the director of the University of Oregon
University of Oregon
Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Erlandson’s research interests include coastal adaptations, the peopling of North America, maritime archaeology and historical ecology and human impacts in coastal ecosystems.[1]Contents1 Education and background 2 Research2.1 Maritime Adaptations 2.2 Kelp Highway Hypothesis: The Peopling of the New World 2.3 Channel Islands: Archaeology and Historical Ecology 2.4 Mosfell Archaeological Project3 Selected publications3.1 Selected Books, Monographs, and Edited Volumes 3.2 Selected Journal Articles and Book Chapters4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEducation and background[edit] Erlandson received his B.A
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Aleut People
The Aleuts (/ˈæli.juːt/ ( listen)) Russian: Алеу́ты (Aleuty), who are usually known in the Aleut
Aleut
language by the endonyms Unangan (eastern dialect), Unangas (western dialect),[4] Унаңан (lit
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Young Adult Literature
Young adult fiction (YA) is a category of fiction published for readers in their youth.[1] YA books are catered towards children between 12 to 18 years old.[2] While the genre is targeted to teenagers, approximately half of YA readers are adults.[3] Subject matters and the genres of YA correlate with the "age and experience" of the protagonist and subsequent supporting characters.[1] The genres available in YA are expansive and similar to those found in adult fiction
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Tribal Chief
A tribal chief is the leader of a tribal society or chiefdom.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Specific tribal chiefdoms3.1 Americas 3.2 Sub-Saharan Africa 3.3 Oceania
Oceania
& Southeast Asia4 Modern states or regions providing an organized form of tribal chiefships4.1 Arabia 4.2 Botswana 4.3 Canada 4.4 Ghana 4.5 Nigeria 4.6 Oceania 4.7 Philippines 4.8 South Africa 4.9 Uganda 4.10 United States4.10.1 Historical cultural differences between tribes 4.10.2 Political power in a tribe 4.10.3 Economic power in a tribe5 See also 6 Notes
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Free-ranging Dog
A free-ranging dog is a dog that is not contained. Free-ranging dogs include wild dogs, feral dogs, stray dogs, street dogs, and village dogs, as well as dogs allowed to come and go freely by their owners. The term is used when distinctions of ownership are irrelevant. It sometimes overlaps with the polysemic term pariah dog
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Canoes
A canoe is a lightweight narrow vessel, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle.[1] In International Canoe Federation
International Canoe Federation
nomenclature used in some European countries such as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
the term canoe refers to kayaks,[2] while canoes are called Canadian canoes. Canoes are professionally used for transport of people and materials all over the world. Besides canoes are widely used for pleasure racing, whitewater canoeing, touring and camping, freestyle, and general recreation. The intended use of the canoe dictates its hull shape and length and construction material. Historically, canoes were dugouts or made of bark on a wood frame,[3] but construction materials evolved to canvas on a wood frame, then to aluminum
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Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures
(also referred to as Universal Studios or simply Universal) is an American film studio owned by Comcast
Comcast
through the Universal Filmed Entertainment Group division of its wholly owned subsidiary NBCUniversal.[2] The company was founded in 1912 by Carl Laemmle, Mark Dintenfass, Charles O. Baumann, Adam Kessel, Pat Powers, William Swanson, David Horsley, Robert H. Cochrane, and Jules Brulatour, and is the oldest surviving film studio in the United States, the world's fourth oldest after Gaumont, Pathé
Pathé
and Nordisk Film, and the oldest in terms of the overall film market[citation needed]
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Whale
Whales are a widely distributed and diverse group of fully aquatic placental marine mammals. They are an informal grouping within the infraorder Cetacea, usually excluding dolphins and porpoises. Whales, dolphins and porpoises belong to the order Cetartiodactyla
Cetartiodactyla
with even-toed ungulates and their closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. The two parvorders of whales, baleen whales (Mysticeti) and toothed whales (Odontoceti), are thought to have split apart around 34 million years ago
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Octopus
The octopus (/ˈɒktəpəs/ or ~/pʊs/) is a soft-bodied, eight-armed mollusc of the order Octopoda. Around 300 species are recognised and the order is grouped within the class Cephalopoda with squids, cuttlefish and nautiloids. Like other cephalopods, the octopus is bilaterally symmetric with two eyes and a beak, with its mouth at the centre point of the arms (which are sometimes mistakenly called "tentacles"). The soft body can rapidly alter its shape, enabling octopuses to squeeze through small gaps. They trail their eight arms behind them as they swim. The siphon is used both for respiration and for locomotion, by expelling a jet of water. Octopuses have a complex nervous system and excellent sight, and are among the most intelligent and behaviourally diverse of all invertebrates. Octopuses inhabit various regions of the ocean, including coral reefs, pelagic waters, and the seabed; some live in the intertidal zone and others at abyssal depths
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Bird
Birds (Aves) are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Birds live worldwide and range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) bee hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) ostrich. They rank as the world’s most numerically-successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerines, sometimes known as perching birds. Birds have wings which are more or less developed depending on the species; the only known groups without wings are the extinct moa and elephant birds. Wings, which evolved from forelimbs, gave birds the ability to fly, although further evolution has led to the loss of flight in flightless birds, including ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species of birds
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Dog
Canis
Canis
familiaris Linnaeus, 1758[2][3]Montage showing the morphological variation of the dog.The domestic dog ( Canis
Canis
lupus familiaris or
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Cormorant
3–43, see textSynonymsAustralocorax Lambrecht, 1931 Compsohalieus B. Brewer & Ridgway, 1884 Cormoranus Baillon, 1834 Dilophalieus Coues, 1903 Ecmeles Gistel, 1848 Euleucocarbo Voisin, 1973 Halietor Heine, 1860 Hydrocorax Vieillot, 1819 (non Brisson, 1760: preoccupied) Hypoleucus Reichenbach, 1852 Leucocarbo Bonaparte, 1857 Microcarbo
Microcarbo
Bonaparte, 1856 Miocorax Lambrecht, 1933 Nannopterum Sharpe, 1899 Nesocarbo Voisin, 1973 Notocarbo Siegel-Causey, 1988 Pallasicarbo Coues, 1903 Paracorax Lambrecht, 1933 Poikilocarbo Boetticher, 1935 Pliocarbo Tugarinov, 1940 Stictocarbo Bonaparte, 1855 Viguacarbo Coues, 1903 (but see text) Phalacrocoracidae
Phalacrocoracidae
is a family of some 40 species of aquatic birds commonly known as cormorants and shags. Several different classifications of the family have been proposed recently, and the number of genera is disputed
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