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Islamic Conquest Of Persia
KhuzestanHormizd-Ardashir Susa Ram-Hormizd Shushtar GundishapurCentral PersiaNahavand Spahan Waj Rudh RayNorthern PersiaTabaristan Armenia Azerbaijan Caucasian Albania IberiaParsBishapur Darabgerd 1st Estakhr Gor 2nd EstakhrKermanSirjan QeshmSakastanZaranjKhorasan Oxus
Oxus
River Nishapur Herat Badghisv t eEarly Muslim
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Muslim Conquest
Islamic expansion:   under Muhammad, 622–632   under Rashidun
Rashidun
caliphs, 632–661   under Umayyad caliphs, 661–750BelligerentsSee list Sasanian Empire Lakhmids Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire Ghassanids Bulgarian Empire Kingdom of
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Mihran-i Hamadani
Mihran-i Hamadani, known in Arabic
Arabic
sources as Mihran ibn Mihrbundadh, was a Sasanian
Sasanian
military officer from the Mihran family. He was the son of a certain Mihrbandad (also known as Mihrbundadh), who is mentioned in some lines in a poem. In 633, Mihran was sent on expedition against the invading Muslim Arabs
Arabs
as the commander of a Sasanian
Sasanian
army, which included several officers such as Piruz Khosrow, Azadbeh Banegan, Bahman Jadhuyih, and a certain Shahrvaraz, who was related to the prominent Sasanian general and briefly king, Shahrbaraz. This army fought against the Arabs
Arabs
at Battle of Buwayb
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Isfandiyar (Sasanian Commander)
Isfandyadh
Isfandyadh
(Middle Persian: Spandiyār) was an Iranian aristocrat from the Ispahbudhan family, who was the ruler of the Sasanian
Sasanian
province of Adurbadagan. He was the son of the powerful Sasanian
Sasanian
general Farrukhzad, who was the brother of Rostam Farrokhzad
Rostam Farrokhzad
and the son of Farrukh Hormizd.Contents1 Biography 2 Family tree 3 References 4 SourcesBiography[edit]Map of Adurbadagan
Adurbadagan
and its surroundings. Isfandyadh
Isfandyadh
first appears in 642/643, where he is mentioned as the prince of Adurbadagan, who at the head of a big army along with Muta and Varaztirots, fought the Muslim Arabs at Waj Rudh, a village in Hamadan.[1] However, he along with the Sasanian
Sasanian
commanders were defeated
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Surrender (military)
Surrender, in military terms, is the relinquishment of control over territory, combatants, fortifications, ships or armament to another power. A surrender may be accomplished peacefully, without fighting, or it may be the result of defeat in battle. A sovereign state may surrender following defeat in a war, usually by signing a peace treaty or capitulation agreement
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Jalinus
Jalinus Fahmi (Galen) (Persian: گلینوش‎) was an Armenian nobleman during the late Sassanian
Sassanian
era.[1] He was the commander of the guard over Khosrau II, during the latter's imprisonment.[2] Jalinus was a Sasanian commander during the Arab Muslim invasion of Mesopotamia.[3] Biography[edit] Jalinus Fahmi was from the Sasanian province of Armenia. After his defeat at the battle of Kaskar,[4] Jalinus was sent by Yazdegerd III to crush the invading Arab forces along with 60,000 men and the commander-in-chief of all armies of the empire, Rostam Farrokhzād
Rostam Farrokhzād
at the Battle of al-Qādisiyyah
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Mihran Razi
Mihran-i Bahram-i Razi, better simply known as Mihran Razi, was an Iranian military officer from the Mihran family. He was killed in 637 at the battle of Jalula. Biography[edit] Mihran is first mentioned during the Arab invasion of Persia, and is known to have commanded the left wing of the Sasanian
Sasanian
army during the battle of al-Qādisiyyah.[1] Mihran, along with Nakhiragan, Hormuzan and Piruz Khosrow, including the rest of the survivors, regrouped at Bavel (Babylon), where they tried to repel the Arab army, but were once again defeated.[2] While Piruz and Hormuzan
Hormuzan
fled different directions, Mihran and Nakhiragan remained in Asoristan. After a brief stay at Veh-Ardashir,[3] they abandoned and destroyed the bridge on the east bank of the Tigris
Tigris
river
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Azadbeh
Azadveh-i Banegan Mahan-i Mihr-Bondad, known in Arabic
Arabic
sources as Azadhbih ibn Baniyan Mahan ibn Mihrbundadh, better simply known as Azadbeh, was an Iranian nobleman, who served as the Sasanian
Sasanian
marzban of the al-Hira. Biography[edit] Azadbeh was born in Hamadan
Hamadan
in the province of Media to a family of dehqan origin. In 617, he was appointed as the governor of al-Hira, thus succeeding the Iranian noble Nakhiragan and the Arab Iyas ibn Qabisah al-Ta'i, who together had co-governed al-Hira after the execution of the last Lakhmid ruler al-Nu'man III in 602
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Farrukhzad
Farrukhzad
Farrukhzad
(Middle Persian: Farrūkhzādag; New Persian: فرخزاد), was an Iranian aristocrat from the House of Ispahbudhan and the founder of the Bavand dynasty, ruling from 651 to 665. Originally a powerful servant of the Sasanian
Sasanian
king Khosrow II
Khosrow II
(r. 590-628), he, along with several other powerful aristocrats made a conspiracy against the latter and ended his tyrannical rule. They thereafter put Khosrow's son Kavadh II
Kavadh II
(r. 628) on the throne, whose rule lasted only a few months, before he was killed by a plague, being succeeded by his son Ardashir III
Ardashir III
(r
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Siyavakhsh
Siyavakhsh
Siyavakhsh
(also spelled Siyavash) was an Iranian aristocrat from the House of Mihran who was descended from Bahrām Chōbin, the famous spahbed of the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
and briefly its emperor.Contents1 Biography 2 Family tree 3 References 4 SourcesBiography[edit]Map of northern Iran
Iran
during Sasanian
Sasanian
rule. Siyavakhsh
Siyavakhsh
was the son Mihran Bahram-i Chubin, whose father was Bahram Chobin. Siyavakhsh
Siyavakhsh
is first mentioned during the first years of the fall of the Sasanian
Sasanian
Empire, where he is said to have ruled Ray as a Sasanian
Sasanian
vassal king
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Busbuhra
Busbuhra was a local ruler of Aramean origin, who shifted alliance between the Rashidun Caliphate
Rashidun Caliphate
and the Sasanian Empire, to remain on his throne. Biography[edit] An Aramean dehqan[1] native to the Sasanian province of Asoristan, Busbuhra was the son of a certain Saluba ibn Nistuna, who, as a Sasanian subject, held the title of "lord" and owned land near al-Hira, the former capital of the Lakhmids, who were vassals of the Sasanians, but had been removed from power in 602. During the beginning of the Arab invasion of Iran, Busbuhra (or his father) made peace with the Arabs by agreeing to pay them and aid them against the Sasanians.[2] Busbuhra is later mentioned in construction a bridge[3] which would allow the Arabs to move deeper into Sasanian territory. However, the Arabs were eventually defeated at the battle of the Bridge
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Died Of Wounds
Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces.[1] The United States
United States
Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. KIAs do not come from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes and other "non-hostile" events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events. Further, KIA denotes one to have been killed in action on the battlefield whereas died of wounds (DOW) relates to someone who survived to reach a medical treatment facility
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Shahriyar Of Derbent
Shahriyar was an Iranian aristocrat, who served as the commander of Kutha, an ancient city close to the Sasanian
Sasanian
capital of Ctesiphon. Born in Derbent
Derbent
to a dehqan family,[1] Shahriyar is first mentioned during the Ar
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Shahrvaraz Jadhuyih
Shahrvaraz Jadhuyih (Persian: شهربراز جادویه‎) was a Sasanian
Sasanian
military officer from the Mihran family. He was related to Shahrbaraz, the Sasanian
Sasanian
spahbed and briefly shahanshah. He participated in the battle of Isfahan along with Fadhusfan and another Persian general against the Islamic Arabs. He was, however, defeated and killed during the battle.[1] References[edit]^ Pourshariati (2008), p. 247Sources[edit]Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London and New York: I.B. Tauris. ISBN 978-1-84511-645-3. This Sasanian
Sasanian
biographical article is a stub
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Prisoner Of War
A prisoner of war (POW) is a person, whether combatant or non-combatant, who is held in custody by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict
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Mushegh III Mamikonian
Mushegh III Mamikonian
Mamikonian
(Armenian: Մուշեղ Գ Մամիկոնյան) was an Armenian sparapet that fought against the Arabs during the Muslim conquest of Persia. He was killed during the Battle of al-Qādisiyyah
Battle of al-Qādisiyyah
in 636.Contents1 Family 2 Death 3 Children 4 See also 5 References 6 SourcesFamily[edit] The family of Mushegh III Mamikonian
Mamikonian
is disputed. The Armenian historian Sebeos
Sebeos
calls him a son of Davith Mamikonian.[1] According to Christian Settipani, Davith was probably the son of Hamazasp, who was the son of Mushegh II Mamikonian.[2] However, Cyril Toumanoff considers Davith as the son of Vahan II
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