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Islamic
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
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Islam (other)
Islam
Islam
is a major world religion. Islam
Islam
may also refer to: Islam
Islam
(name), surname or male given nameFilm and TV program[edit]Islam: Empire of Faith, 2000 TV documentary series Islam: The Untold Story, 2012 documentary film Islam: What the West Needs to Know, 2006 documentary filmBook[edit]Islam: A Short History, 2000 book by Karen Armstrong Islam: Beliefs and Observances, book by Caesar E. Farah Islam: Beliefs and Teachings, book by Ghulam Sarwar Islam: Past, Present and Future, 2007 book by Hans Küng Islam: The Straight Path, 1988 book by John L
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Iman (concept)
Iman (إِيمَان ʾīmān, lit. faith or belief) in Islamic theology denotes a believer's faith in the metaphysical aspects of Islam.[1][2] Its most simple definition is the belief in the six articles of faith, known as arkān al-īmān. The term iman has been delineated in both the Quran
Quran
and the Hadith
Hadith
of Gabriel.[3] According to the Quran, iman must be accompanied by righteous deeds and the two together are necessary for entry into Paradise.[4] In the Hadith
Hadith
of Gabriel, iman in addition to Islam
Islam
and ihsan form the three dimensions of the Islamic religion. There exists a debate both within and outside Islam
Islam
on the link between faith and reason in religion, and the relative importance of either
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Islamic Holy Books
Islamic holy books
Islamic holy books
are the texts which Muslims believe were authored by Allah
Allah
via various prophets throughout humanity's history
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Islamic View Of Angels
In Islam, Angels (Arabic: ملاك malāk; plural: ملاًئِكة mala'ikah) are celestrial beings, created from a luminious origin by God
God
to perform certain tasks He has given them. The Angels from the angelic realm are subordinates in a hierarchy headed by one of the Archangels in the highest heavens.[1] Belief in Angels is one of the six Articles of Faith in Islam.Contents1 Concepts of Angels1.1 As personified creatures 1.2 As abstract concepts2 Angels impeccability 3 Individual Angels3.1 Archangels 3.2 Other Angels and Angel
Angel
groups4 Vision of Angels 5 Distinction between Angels and Jinn 6 See also 7 NotesConcepts of Angels[edit] Islam
Islam
acknowledges the concept of Angels both as anthropomorphic and abstract.[2] As personified creatures[edit] Angels are another kind of creature created by God, known to mankind, commonly dwelling in the heavenly spheres
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List Of Islamic Texts
اللهPart of a series onMuslim scriptures Revelation
Revelation
from GodTawrat Zabur Injil QuranSix major hadith collectionsSahih Bukhari Sahih MuslimSunan al-Sughra Sunan Abu DawoodJami al-Tirmidhi Sunan ibn MajahOther hadith collectionsName Period (CE)Muwatta Imam Malik  Musnad Ahmad Ibn Hanbal 780–855Sunan Al-Darimi 868Shama'il Muhammadiyah (Shamaail Tirmidhi)9th centurySahih Ibn Khuzaymah 923Ṣaḥīḥ Ibn Ḥibbān 965Al-Mustadrak Alaa Al-Ṣaḥīḥaīn  Al-Mawdū'āt Al-Kubrā 11
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Dawah
Da‘wah (also daawa or daawah; Arabic: دعوة‎ "invitation") is the proselytizing or preaching of Islam.Contents1 Etymology 2 Early Islam 3 During Muhammad's era3.1 Post-Muhammad4 Purpose 5 Proselytism 6 Proselytizing methods6.1 Gentleness 6.2 Influence in politics 6.3 Wisdom 6.4 Speaking a common language 6.5 Location7 Proselytizing movements 8 See also 9 Footnotes 10 References 11 External linksEtymology[edit] Da‘wah literally means "issuing a summons" or "making an invitation", being a gerund of a verb meaning variously "to summon" or "to invite" (whose triconsonantal root is d-ʕ-w دعو)
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Morality In Islam
Morality
Morality
in Islam
Islam
is a comprehensive term that serves to include the concept of righteousness, good character, and the body of moral qualities and virtues prescribed in Islamic religious texts. The underlying idea of Islamic morality is that of love: love for God
God
and love for God's creatures. The idea is that mankind will acquire and follow the body of moral qualities in order to seek God's pleasure and to treat the fellow human beings in the best possible manner.[1][2] Teaching on morality and moral conduct constitute a basic principle of Islam, and the moral themes form a large part of it
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Spread Of Islam
Early Muslim conquests
Early Muslim conquests
in the years following the Prophet Muhammad's death led to the creation of the caliphates, occupying a vast geographical area and conversion to Islam
Islam
was boosted by missionary activities particularly those of Imams, who easily intermingled with local populace to propagate the religious teachings.[1] These early caliphates, coupled with Muslim
Muslim
economics and trading and the later expansion of the Ottoman Empire, resulted in Islam's spread outwards from Mecca
Mecca
towards both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the creation of the Muslim
Muslim
world
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Islamic Poetry
Islamic
Islamic
poetry is poetry written by Muslims. Islamic
Islamic
poetry has been written in many languages.Contents1 History and origins 2 Islamic
Islamic
poetry in different languages 3 Genres of Islamic
Islamic
poetry 4 ReferencesHistory and origins[edit] Beginning with the migration of Muhammad
Muhammad
and his followers to Mecca (A.D. 622), also known as the Hijrah, the quasidah or ode was a sharp contrast to the sacred Quran. Writers at the time of pre-Islamic poetry were considered to be lacking the knowledge and authority necessary to be writing such poetry, thus leading this period of time to be called the “Age of Ignorance”
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Prophetic Biography
In Islam, Al-sīra al-Nabawiyya (Prophetic biography[1]), Sīrat Rasūl Allāh (Life of the Messenger of God[2]), or just Al-sīra are the traditional Muslim
Muslim
biographies of Muhammad
Muhammad
from which, in addition to the
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Sahabah
The term aṣ-ṣaḥābah (Arabic: الصحابة‎ meaning "the companions", from the verb صَحِبَ meaning "accompany", "keep company with", "associate with") refers to the companions, disciples, scribes and family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1][2] This form is definite plural; the indefinite singular is masculine sahabi (ṣaḥābī), feminine sahabia (ṣaḥābīyat). Later scholars accepted their testimony of the words and deeds of Muhammad, the occasions on which the Quran
Quran
was revealed and various important matters of Islamic history and practice
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Tafsir
Tafsir
Tafsir
(Arabic: تفسير‎, translit. Tafsīr, lit. 'interpretation') is the Arabic word for exegesis, usually of the Qur'an. An author of tafsir is a mufassir (Arabic: مُفسّر‎; plural: Arabic: مفسّرون‎, translit. mufassirūn). A Qur'anic
Qur'anic
tafsir attempts at providing elucidation, explanation, interpretation, or commentary for clear understanding and conviction of God's will.[1] Principally, tafsir deals with the issues of linguistics, jurisprudence, and theology. In terms of perspective and approach, tafsir can be broadly divided into two categories, namely tafsir bi-al-ma'thur (lit. received tafsir) which is transmitted from the early days of Islam
Islam
through the prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and his companions, and tafsir bi-al-ra'y (lit
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Sunnah
Sunnah
Sunnah
(sunnah, سنة, Arabic: [sunna], plural سنن sunan [sunan]) is the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings, silent permissions (or disapprovals) of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, as well as various reports about Muhammad's companions.[1][2] The Quran
Quran
(the holy book of Isl
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Rashidun
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
Islam
portalv t eThe Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphs (Rightly Guided Caliphs; Arabic: الخلفاء الراشدون‎ al-Khulafāʾu ar-Rāshidūn), often simply called, collectively, "the Rashidun", is a term used in Sunni Islam
Islam
to refer to the 30-year reign of the first four caliphs (successors) following the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, namely: Abu Bakr, Umar, Uthman
Uthman
ibn Affan, and Ali
Ali
of the Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphate, the first caliphate
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Ahl Al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
(Arabic: أهل البيت‎, Persian: اهلِ بیت‎), also Āl al-Bayt, is a phrase meaning, literally, "People of the House" or "Family of the House". Within the Islamic tradition, the term refers to the family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1] In Shia Islam
Shia Islam
the Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
are central to Islam
Islam
and interpreters of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah. Shias believe they are successors of Muhammad and consist of Muhammad, Fatimah, Ali, Hasan, and Husayn (known collectively as the Ahl al-Kisa, "people of the mantle") and the Imams the Fourteen Infallibles
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