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Isauria
Isauria
Isauria
(/aɪˈzɔːriə/ or /aɪˈsɔːriə/; Ancient Greek: Ἰσαυρία), in ancient geography, is a rugged isolated district in the interior of South Asia Minor, of very different extent at different periods,[1] but generally covering what is now the district of Bozkır
Bozkır
and its surroundings in the Konya Province
Konya Province
of Turkey, or the core of the Taurus Mountains
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Patriarch Of Antioch
Patriarch of Antioch
Patriarch of Antioch
is a traditional title held by the Bishop
Bishop
of Antioch. As the traditional "overseer" (ἐπίσκοπος, episkopos, from which the word bishop is derived) of the first gentile Christian
Christian
community, the position has been of prime importance in the church from its earliest period. This diocese is one of the few for which the names of its bishops from the apostolic beginnings have been preserved. Today five churches use the title of Patriarch of Antioch: the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Syriac Catholic Church, the Melkite
Melkite
Greek Catholic Church, and the Maronite
Maronite
Church. Historically, there has also been a Latin Patriarch of Antioch. According to church tradition, this ancient Patriarchate
Patriarchate
was founded by the Apostle Saint Peter
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Konya Province
Konya
Konya
Province (Turkish: Konya
Konya
ili) is a province of Turkey
Turkey
in central Anatolia. The provincial capital is the city of Konya. By area it is the largest province of Turkey
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Alexander The Great
Alexander
Alexander
III of Macedon
Macedon
(20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander
Alexander
the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, translit. Aléxandros ho Mégas, Koine
Koine
Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon[a] and a member of the Argead
Argead
dynasty. He was born in Pella
Pella
in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of twenty
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Macedon
Macedonia (/ˌmæsɪˈdoʊniə/ ( listen)) or Macedon (/ˈmæsɪˌdɒn/; Greek: Μακεδονία, Makedonía) was an ancient kingdom on the periphery of Archaic and Classical Greece,[4] and later the dominant state of Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Greece.[5] The kingdom was founded and initially ruled by the royal Argead dynasty, which was followed by the Antipatrid and Antigonid dynasties
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Perdiccas
Perdiccas
Perdiccas
(Greek: Περδίκκας, Perdikkas; c. 355 BC – 321/320 BC) became a general in Alexander the Great's army and participated in Alexander's campaign against Persia. Following Alexander's death, he rose to become supreme commander of the imperial army and regent for Alexander's half brother and intellectually disabled successor, Philip Arridaeus (Philip III). He was the first of the Diadochi
Diadochi
who fought for control over Alexander's empire but in his attempts to establish a power base and stay in control of the empire, he managed to make enemies of key generals in the Macedonian army, Antipater, Craterus
Craterus
and Antigonus Monophtalmus, who decided to revolt against the regent
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Calycadnus
The Göksu (Turkish for "blue water" also called Geuk Su, Goksu Nehri; medieval Latin: Saleph, Ancient Greek: Καλύκαδνος Calycadnus) is a river on the Taşeli plateau (Turkey). Both its sources arise in the Taurus Mountains—the northern in the Geyik Mountains and the southern in the Haydar Mountains. Their confluence is south of Mut. Course[edit] The river is 260 km long and empties into the Mediterranean Sea 16 km southeast of Silifke (in Mersin province). The delta of the Göksu, including Akgöl Lake and Paradeniz Lagoon, is one of the most important breeding areas in the Near East; over 300 bird species have been observed. Among others, flamingos, herons, bee-eaters, kingfishers, gulls, nightingales and warblers breed here
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Water Divide
A drainage divide, water divide, divide, ridgeline,[1] watershed, or water parting is the line that separates neighbouring drainage basins. On rugged land, the divide lies along topographical ridges, and may be in the form of a single range of hills or mountains, known as a dividing range
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Lystra
Lystra
Lystra
(Ancient Greek: Λύστρα) was a city in central Anatolia, now part of present-day Turkey. It is mentioned five times in the New Testament.[1] Lystra
Lystra
was visited several times by the Apostle Paul, along with Barnabas
Barnabas
or Silas. There Paul met a young disciple, Timothy.[2]Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Remains 4 Footnotes 5 External linksLocation[edit] The site of Lystra
Lystra
is believed to be located 30 kilometres (19 mi) south of the city of Konya
Konya
( Iconium
Iconium
in the New Testament), north of the village of Hatunsaray and some 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) north of a small town called Akoren
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Amyntas Of Galatia
Amyntas (Ancient Greek: Ἀμύντας), Tetrarch of the Trocmi was a King of Galatia
Galatia
and of several adjacent countries between 36 and 25 BC, mentioned by Strabo[1] as contemporary with himself. He was the son of Brogitarus, king of Galatia, and Adobogiona, daughter of king Deiotarus Philoromaeus. Amyntas seems to have first possessed Lycaonia, where he maintained more than 300 flocks.[1] To this he added the territory of Derbe by the murder of its prince, Antipater of Derbe, the friend of Cicero,[2] and Isaura
Isaura
and Cappadocia
Cappadocia
by Roman favour
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A Escrava Isaura (other)
A Escrava Isaura may refer to: A Escrava Isaura (novel), an 1875 novel by Bernardo Guimarães A Escrava Isaura (1949 film), a Brazilian film of 1949 Escrava Isaura (1976 TV series), an adaptation of the novel produced by Rede Globo A Escrava Isaura (2004 TV series), an adaptation of the novel produced by Rede RecordThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title A Escrava Isaura. If an inte
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Mount Taurus
The Taurus Mountains
Taurus Mountains
(Turkish: Toros Dağları, Armenian: Թորոս լեռներ), Ancient Greek: Ὄρη Ταύρου) are a mountain complex in southern Turkey, separating the Mediterranean coastal region of southern Turkey
Turkey
from the central Anatolian Plateau. The system extends along a curve from Lake Eğirdir
Lake Eğirdir
in the west to the upper reaches of the Euphrates
Euphrates
and Tigris
Tigris
rivers in the east
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Ammianus Marcellinus
Ammianus Marcellinus
Ammianus Marcellinus
(born c. 330[1], died c. 391 – 400) was a Roman soldier and historian who wrote the penultimate major historical account surviving from Antiquity (preceding Procopius)
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Asia Minor
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Notitiae Episcopatuum
The Notitiae Episcopatuum (singular: Notitia Episcopatuum) are official documents that furnish Eastern countries the list and hierarchical rank of the metropolitan and suffragan bishoprics of a church. In the Roman Church (the -mostly Latin Rite- 'Western Patriarchate' of Rom), archbishops and bishops were classed according to the seniority of their consecration, and in Africa according to their age. In the Eastern patriarchates, however, the hierarchical rank of each bishop was determined by the see he occupied. Thus, in the Patriarchate of Constantinople, the first Metropolitan was not the longest ordained, but whoever happened to be the incumbent of the See of Caesarea; the second was the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Ephesus, and so on
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