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Irving Caesar
Irving Caesar
Irving Caesar
(July 4, 1895 – December 18, 1996) was an American lyricist and theater composer who wrote lyrics for numerous song standards including "Swanee", "Sometimes I'm Happy", "Crazy Rhythm", and "Tea for Two", one of the most frequently recorded tunes ever written. In 1972 he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Broadway credits 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Caesar, the son of Morris Keiser, a Romanian Jew, was born Isidor Keiser, in New York City. His older brother Arthur Caesar was a successful Hollywood
Hollywood
screenwriter. The Caesar brothers spent their childhood and teen years in Yorkville, the same Manhattan
Manhattan
neighborhood where the Marx Brothers
Marx Brothers
were raised. Caesar knew the Marx Brothers during his childhood
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Revue
A revue (from French 'magazine' or 'overview') is a type of multi-act popular theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance, and sketches. The revue has its roots in 19th century popular entertainment and melodrama but grew into a substantial cultural presence of its own during its golden years from 1916 to 1932. Though most famous for their visual spectacle, revues frequently satirized contemporary figures, news or literature. Similar to the related subforms of operetta and musical theatre, the revue art form brings together music, dance and sketches to create a compelling show. In contrast to these, however, revue does not have an overarching storyline
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Curly Top
Curly top
Curly top
is the name of a number of viral plant diseases, many of which affect food crops. They are often caused by curtoviruses (genus Curtovirus), members of the virus family Geminiviridae. Curly top
Curly top
is characterized by stunting of the plant and deformation of leaves and fruit. The petioles and blades of the leaves curl, twist, and become discolored.[1] Beet curly top virus
Beet curly top virus
causes curly top disease in beets and is carried by the beet leafhopper
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Louis Prima
Louis Leo Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an Italian American singer, actor, songwriter, bandleader, and trumpeter. While rooted in New Orleans
New Orleans
jazz, swing music, and jump blues, Prima touched on various genres throughout his career: he formed a seven-piece New Orleans-style jazz band in the late 1920s, fronted a swing combo in the 1930s and a big band group in the 1940s, helped to popularize jump blues in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s, and performed as a Vegas lounge act in the late 1950s and 1960s.[citation needed] From the 1940s through the 1960s, his music further encompassed early R&B and rock'n'roll, boogie-woogie, and even Italian folk music, such as the tarantella. Prima made prominent use of Italian music and language in his songs, blending elements of his Italian identity with jazz and swing music
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David Lee Roth
David Lee Roth
David Lee Roth
(born October 10, 1954)[1] is an American rock vocalist, songwriter, actor, author, and former radio personality. Roth is best known as the original (1974–1985) and current (2006–present) lead singer of hard rock band Van Halen. He is also known as a successful solo artist, releasing numerous RIAA-certified Gold and Platinum albums.[2] After more than two decades apart, Roth re-joined Van Halen
Van Halen
in 2006 for a North American tour that became the highest grossing in the band's history[3] and one of the highest grossing of that year.[4] In 2012, Roth and Van Halen
Van Halen
released the comeback album A Different Kind of Truth
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Gerald Marks
Gerald Marks (October 13, 1900 – January 27, 1997) was an American composer from Saginaw, Michigan. He was best known for the song "All of Me" which he co-wrote with Seymour Simons and has been recorded about 2,000 times. He also wrote the songs "That's What I Want for Christmas" for the film Stowaway starring Shirley Temple, and "Is It True What They Say About Dixie" recorded by Al Jolson
Al Jolson
and Rudy Vallee. The success of his song "All of Me" led him to become a member of ASCAP, and he remained active in the organization for decades, serving on its board of directors from 1970 to 1981. References[edit]David A
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United Nations
The United Nations
United Nations
(UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II
World War II
with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, promoting human rights, fostering social and economic development, protecting the environment, and providing humanitarian aid in cases of famine, natural disaster, and armed conflict
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Performance Rights Organisation
A performance rights organisation (PRO), also known as a performing rights society, provides intermediary functions, particularly collection of royalties, between copyright holders and parties who wish to use copyrighted works publicly in locations such as shopping and dining venues. Legal consumer purchase of works, such as buying CDs from a music store, confer private performance rights. PROs usually only collect royalties when use of a work is incidental to an organisation's purpose. Royalties for works essential to an organisation's purpose, such as theaters and radio, are usually negotiated directly with the rights holder. In some countries PROs are called copyright collectives or copyright collecting agencies. A copyright collective is more general than a PRO as it is not limited to performances and includes reproduction rights organisations (RROs)
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ASCAP
The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP /ˈæskæp/) is an American not-for-profit performance-rights organization (PRO) that protects its members' musical copyrights by monitoring public performances of their music, whether via a broadcast or live performance, and compensating them accordingly.[1] ASCAP collects licensing fees from users of music created by ASCAP members, then distributes them back to its members as royalties
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Musical Theater
Musical theatre
Musical theatre
is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. The story and emotional content of a musical – humor, pathos, love, anger – are communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated whole. Although musical theatre overlaps with other theatrical forms like opera and dance, it may be distinguished by the equal importance given to the music as compared with the dialogue, movement and other elements. Since the early 20th century, musical theatre stage works have generally been called, simply, musicals. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America
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Ziegfeld
Florenz Edward Ziegfeld Jr. (March 21, 1867 – July 22, 1932), popularly known as Flo Ziegfeld, was an American Broadway impresario, notable for his series of theatrical revues, the Ziegfeld Follies (1907–1931), inspired by the Folies Bergère
Folies Bergère
of Paris. He also produced the musical Show Boat. He was known as the "glorifier of the American girl".[1] Ziegfeld is a member of the American Theater Hall of Fame.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Accolades 3 Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
productions 4 Films 5 Cultural references 6 Archive 7 Further reading 8 References 9 External linksBiography[edit]Poster for The Sandow Trocadero Vaudevilles, produced by Ziegfeld (1894)Florenz Edward Ziegfeld Jr. was born on March 21, 1867,[3][4]:8 in Chicago, Illinois
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Lyricist
A lyricist or lyrist is a person who writes lyrics—words for songs—as opposed to a composer, who writes the song's melody.Contents1 Royalties 2 Collaboration 3 Religious song-writing 4 Classical music 5 See also 6 External linksRoyalties[edit] A lyricist's income derives from royalties received from original songs. Royalties may range from 50% of the song if it was written primarily with the composer, or less if they wrote the song in collaboration. Songs are automatically copyrighted as soon as they are in tangible form, such as a recording or sheet music. However, before a song is published or made public, its author or publisher should register it with the Copyright
Copyright
Office at the U.S. Library of Congress to better protect against copyright infringement. Collaboration[edit] Collaboration takes different forms. Some composers and lyricists work closely together on a song, with each having an input into both words and tune
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Play (theatre)
A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading. Plays are performed at a variety of levels, from Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, to Community theatre, as well as university or school productions. There are rare dramatists, notably George Bernard Shaw, who have had little preference as to whether their plays were performed or read
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Playwright
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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The White Horse Inn
White Horse Inn (or The White Horse Inn), (German title: Im weißen Rößl), is an operetta or musical comedy by Ralph Benatzky
Ralph Benatzky
and Robert Stolz in collaboration with a number of other composers and writers, set in the picturesque Salzkammergut
Salzkammergut
region of Upper Austria. It is about the head waiter of the White Horse Inn in St. Wolfgang who is desperately in love with the owner of the inn, a resolute young woman who at first only has eyes for one of her regular guests. Sometimes classified as an operetta, the show enjoyed huge successes both on Broadway and in the West End (651 performances at the Coliseum starting 8 April 1931) and was filmed several times
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