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Irish Standard Time
The Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
uses Irish Standard Time
Irish Standard Time
(IST, UTC+01:00; Irish: Am Caighdeánach Éireannach) in the summer months and Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time
(UTC+0; Meán-Am Greenwich) in the winter period.[1] In the Republic of Ireland, the Standard Time Act 1968
Standard Time Act 1968
legally established that the time for general purposes in the State (to be known as standard time) shall be one hour in advance of Greenwich mean time throughout the year.[2] This act was amended by the Standard Time (Amendment) Act 1971, which legally established Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time
as a winter time period.[1] Ireland therefore operates one hour behind standard time during the winter period, and reverts to standard time in the summer months
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Tommy Broughan
Thomas Patrick "Tommy" Broughan (born 1 August 1947) is an Irish politician who has been a Teachta Dála (TD) since the 1992 general election, currently for the Dublin Bay North constituency. He sat for the Labour Party until late 2011, representing the Dublin North-East constituency from 1992 until constituency changes for the 2016 general election.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Labour Party 3 Social Democratic Union 4 2016 general election 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Broughan was born in Dublin and educated at Moyle Park, Clondalkin, University College Dublin and University of London. He worked as a teacher at St Aidan's CBS, Whitehall, before entering politics in 1991, when he was elected to Dublin City Council. Labour Party[edit] The following year, Broughan was first elected to Dáil Éireann at the 1992 general election to the 27th Dáil as a TD for Dublin North-East
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Irish Parliamentary Party
The Irish Parliamentary Party
Irish Parliamentary Party
(Irish: Páirtí Parlaiminteach na hÉireann[1]) (IPP; commonly called the Irish Party or the Home Rule Party) was formed in 1874 by Isaac Butt, the leader of the Nationalist Party, replacing the Home Rule League, as official parliamentary party for Irish nationalist Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons at Westminster within the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
Ireland
up until 1918. Its central objectives were legislative independence for Ireland
Ireland
and land reform
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March
March
March
is the third month of the year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the second of seven months to have a length of 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March
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October
October
October
is the tenth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the sixth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The eighth month in the old Roman calendar, October
October
retained its name (from the Latin ôctō meaning "eight") after January
January
and February were inserted into the calendar that had originally been created by the Romans. In Ancient Rome, one of three Mundus patet would take place on October
October
5, Meditrinalia October
October
11, Augustalia
Augustalia
on October
October
12, October Horse
October Horse
on October
October
15, and Armilustrium on October
October
19. These dates do not correspond to the modern Gregorian calendar
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Local Mean Time
Local mean time
Local mean time
is a form of solar time that corrects the variations of local apparent time, forming a uniform time scale at a specific longitude. This measurement of time was used for everyday use during the 19th century before time zones were introduced beginning in the late 19th century; it still has some uses in astronomy and navigation.[1] Past use[edit] Local mean time
Local mean time
was used from the early 19th century, when local solar time or sundial time was last used until standard time was adopted on various dates in the several countries. Each town or city kept its own meridian. This led to a situation where locations one degree of longitude apart had times four minutes apart.[2] This became a problem in the mid 19th century when railways needed clocks that were synchronized between stations, at the same time as people needed to match their clock (or the church clock) to the time tables
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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Dunsink Observatory
The Dunsink Observatory is an astronomical observatory established in 1785 in the townland of Dunsink near the city of Dublin, Ireland.[1] Its most famous director was William Rowan Hamilton, who, amongst other things, discovered quaternions, the first non-commutative algebra, while walking from the observatory to the city with his wife. He is also renowned for his Hamiltonian formulation of dynamics. In the late 20th century, the city encroached ever more on the observatory, which compromised the seeing. The telescope, no longer state of the art, was used mainly for public 'open nights'. Dunsink observatory is currently part of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS). It provides accommodation for visiting scientists and is also used for conferences and public outreach events. Public talks on astronomy and astrophysics are given regularly at the observatory by professional and amateur astronomers
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Easter Rising
The Easter Rising
Easter Rising
(Irish: Éirí Amach na Cásca),[2] also known as the Easter Rebellion, was an armed insurrection in Ireland
Ireland
during Easter Week, April 1916. The Rising was launched by Irish republicans to end British rule in Ireland
Ireland
and establish an independent Irish Republic while the United Kingdom was heavily engaged in the First World War. It was the most significant uprising in Ireland
Ireland
since the rebellion of 1798, and the first armed action of the Irish revolutionary period. Organised by a seven-man Military Council of the Irish Republican Brotherhood,[3] the Rising began on Easter Monday, 24 April 1916, and lasted for six days
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Irish Language
The Irish language
Irish language
(Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language,[5] is a Goidelic
Goidelic
language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland
Ireland
and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people, and as a second language by a larger group of non-native speakers. Irish has been the predominant language of the Irish people
Irish people
for most of their recorded history, and they have brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Manx respectively
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Republic Of Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen)), also known as the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(Poblacht na hÉireann), is a sovereign state in north-western Europe
Europe
occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern part of the island, and whose metropolitan area is home to around a third of the country's 4.75 million inhabitants. The state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, Saint George's Channel
Saint George's Channel
to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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John Dillon
John Dillon
John Dillon
(4 September 1851 – 4 August 1927) was an Irish politician from Dublin, who served as a Member of Parliament (MP) for over 35 years and was the last leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party. By political disposition Dillon was an advocate of Irish nationalism, originally a follower of Charles Stewart Parnell, supporting land reform and Irish Home Rule.Contents1 Early life 2 Radical reformer 3 Anti-Parnellite course 4 Party manoeuvrings 5 Conciliation unthinkable 6 Uncompromising stand for peace 7 Family background 8 Notes 9 External linksEarly life[edit] John Dillon
John Dillon
was born in Blackrock, Dublin, a son of the former "Young Irelander" John Blake Dillon (1814–1866). He was educated at Catholic University School, at Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin
and at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium
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First Reading
A reading of a bill is a debate on the bill held before the general body of a legislature, as opposed to before a committee or an other group. In the Westminster system, there are usually several readings of a bill among the stages it passes through before becoming law as an Act of Parliament. Some of these readings are usually formalities rather than substantive debates.Contents1 First reading 2 Second reading 3 Third reading 4 See also 5 References5.1 BibliographyFirst reading[edit] A first reading is when a bill is introduced to a legislature. Typically, in the United States, the title of the bill is read and immediately assigned to a committee. The bill is then considered by committee between the first and second readings. In the United States Senate and most British-influenced legislatures, the committee consideration occurs between second and third readings
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T. M. Healy
Timothy Michael Healy, KC (17 May 1855 – 26 March 1931) was an Irish nationalist politician, journalist, author, barrister and one of the most controversial Irish Members of Parliament (MPs) in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
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