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Irish Property Bubble
The Irish property bubble
Irish property bubble
was the overshooting part of a long-term price increase of real estate in the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
from the late 1990s to 2007, a period known as the Celtic Tiger. In 2006 the prices peaked at the top of the bubble, with a combination of increased speculative construction and rapidly rising prices; in 2007 the prices first stabilised and then started falling until 2010. By the second quarter of 2010, house prices in Ireland had fallen by 35% compared with the second quarter of 2007, and the number of housing loans approved fell by 73%.[1][2] The fall in domestic and commercial property prices contributed to the post-2008 Irish banking crisis
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Real Property
In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things. The term is historic, arising from the now-discontinued form of action, which distinguished between real property disputes and personal property disputes
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The Economist
The Economist
Economist
is an English-language
English-language
weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist
Economist
Group and edited at offices in London.[2][6][7][8] Continuous publication began under its founder, James Wilson, in September 1843. In 2015 its average weekly circulation was a little over 1.5 million, about half of which were sold in the United States.[5][2]The publication belongs to the Economist
Economist
Group. It is 50% owned by the English branch of the Rothschild family
Rothschild family
and by the Agnelli family through its holding company Exor. The remaining 50% is held by private investors including the editors and staff.[9][10] The Rothschilds and the Agnellis are represented on the board of directors.[11] A board of trustees formally appoints the editor, who cannot be removed without its permission
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Property Ladder
The property ladder is a term widely used in the United Kingdom to describe the relative differences in constant terms from cheaper to more expensive housing. According to this metaphor, an individual or family's lifetime progress can be traveled equally from cheap houses for younger first-time buyers who are typically at the bottom of the property ladder, and expensive houses are at the top
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Greater Dublin
The Greater Dublin
Dublin
Area (GDA; Irish: Mórcheantar Bhaile Átha Cliath), or simply Greater Dublin, is the city of Dublin
Dublin
and its hinterland, with varying definitions as to its extent. The National Transport Authority has defined the Greater Dublin
Dublin
Area as including the counties of Dublin
Dublin
( Dublin
Dublin
City, South Dublin, Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown and Fingal), Meath, Kildare, and Wicklow. However, this area does not comprise a formal political unit
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County Wicklow
County Wicklow (Irish: Contae Chill Mhantáin, [ˈkɔnˠt̪ˠeː ˈçɪl̪ʲ ˈwanˠt̪ˠaːnʲ]) is a county in Ireland. The last of the traditional 32 counties to be formed, as late as 1606, it is part of the Mid-East Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the town of Wicklow, which derives from the Old Norse name Víkingaló, which means "Vikings' Meadow". Wicklow County Council is the local authority for the county
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County Kildare
County
County
Kildare
Kildare
(Irish: Contae Chill Dara) is a county in Ireland. It is located in the province of Leinster
Leinster
and is part of the Mid-East Region. It is named after the town of Kildare
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County Meath
County Meath (/miːð/ MEEDH; Irish: Contae na Mí or simply an Mhí) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Mid-East Region. It is named after the historic Kingdom of Meath (from Midhe meaning "middle" or "centre").[1] Meath County Council is the local authority for the county. According to the 2016 census, the population of the county is 195,044.[2] The county town of Meath is Navan (An Uaimh)
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County Louth
County Louth (Irish: Contae Lú)[3] is a county[4] in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Border Region. It is named after the village of Louth. Louth County Council is the local authority for the county
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County Carlow
County Carlow (Irish: Contae Cheatharlach) is a county in Ireland, part of the South-East Region and the province of Leinster.[8] It is named after the town of Carlow, which lies on the River Barrow. Carlow County Council is the local authority. The population was 54,612 at the 2011 census.Contents1 Geography and political subdivisions1.1 Baronies 1.2 Towns and villages2 Local government and politics 3 Sport 4 People 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography and political subdivisions[edit] Carlow, or "Ceatharlach" originally part of the Norman Palantine-county of Leinster, became a separate county probably around 1306.[9] At that time it was larger than today, extending to and including the coastal area around Arklow, though control of this area became disputed with the Irish chieftains of the area
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Irish Independent
The Irish Independent
Irish Independent
is Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper, published by Independent News & Media (INM). It often includes glossy magazines.[1] While most of the paper's content in English, it also publishes a weekly supplement in Irish called Seachtain. ("Seachtain" is the Irish word for "week".) The Irish Independent's sister publication is the Sunday Independent. Since May 2012, the Irish Independent
Irish Independent
has been controlled by billionaire Denis O'Brien since he acquired 29.9% of the paper's parent company
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Brendan O'Connor (journalist)
Height 6 ft 4 in (193 cm)[3][4]Spouse(s) Sarah Caden[4]Children 2Brendan O'Connor (born 23 January 1970) is an Irish media personality, columnist, comedian and retired pop star. He presented The Saturday Night Show on RTÉ One from 2010 to 2015, he is also known for his columns in the Sunday Independent newspaper.[5] He is also editor of the newspaper's Life Magazine.[4][6] O'Connor's pop career included a one-hit wonder as Fr. Brian & The Fun Loving Cardinals, the comedy song "Who's in the House?", reaching number 3 in the Irish charts. O'Connor has pursued varied media career over several decades in Ireland. During the 1990s he appeared on Don't Feed the Gondolas, as well as on a number of other TV programmes. During the 2000s he served a member of the judging panel on Raidió Teilifís Éireann's (RTÉ) You're a Star TV talent contest before presenting The Apprentice: You're Fired! and The Saturday Night Show
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Vincent Browne
Vincent Browne
Vincent Browne
(born 17 July 1944) is an Irish print and broadcast journalist. He is a columnist with The Irish Times
The Irish Times
and The Sunday Business Post and a non-practising barrister. From 1996 until 2007, he presented a nightly talk-show on RTÉ Radio, Tonight with Vincent Browne, which focused on politics, the proceedings of tribunals on political corruption and police misconduct. From 2007 to 2017 he presented Tonight with Vincent Browne
Tonight with Vincent Browne
on TV3,[1] which was broadcast from Monday to Thursday at 11:00pm. "[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Politics 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in 1944, he grew up in Broadford, County Limerick, where he attended the local national school. He spent a year at the Irish language college, Coláiste na Rinne in An Rinn, County Waterford, then a year at St
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Central Bank Of Ireland
The Central Bank of Ireland
Bank of Ireland
(Irish: Banc Ceannais na hÉireann) is Ireland's central bank, and as such part of the European System of Central Banks (ESCB). It is also the country's financial services regulator for most categories of financial firms
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Monetary Policy
Monetary policy
Monetary policy
is the process by which the monetary authority of a country, typically the central bank or currency board, controls either the cost of very short-term borrowing or the monetary base, often targeting an inflation rate or interest rate to ensure price stability and general trust in the currency.[1][2][3] Further goals of a monetary policy are usually to contribute to the stability of gross domestic product, to achieve and maintain low unemployment, and to maintain predictable exchange rates with other currencies. Monetary economics
Monetary economics
provides insight into how to craft an optimal monetary policy. In developed countries, monetary policy has generally been formed separately from fiscal policy, which refers to taxation, government spending, and associated borrowing.[4] Monetary policy
Monetary policy
is referred to as being either expansionary or contractionary
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The Irish Times
The Irish Times
The Irish Times
is an Irish daily broadsheet newspaper launched on 29 March 1859. The editor is Paul O'Neill who succeeded Kevin O'Sullivan on 5 April 2017;[1] the deputy editor is Denis Staunton.[2] The Irish Times is published every day except Sundays. It employs 420 people.[3] Though formed as a Protestant nationalist paper, within two decades and under new owners it had become the voice of Irish unionism.[4] It is no longer considered a unionist paper; it is generally perceived as being politically "liberal and progressive",[5] as well as promoting neoliberalism on economic issues.[6] The editorship of the newspaper from 1859 until 1986 was controlled by the Anglo-Irish Protestant minority, only gaining its first nominal Irish Catholic
Irish Catholic
editor 127 years into its existence. The paper's most prominent columnists include writer and arts commentator Fintan O'Toole and satirist Miriam Lord
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