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Irish-Catholic
Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
are an ethnoreligious group native to Ireland[1][2] that are both Catholic and Irish. Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
have a large diaspora, which includes more than 36 million Americans.[3] Divisions between Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
and Irish Protestants played a major role in the history of Ireland
Ireland
from the 16th to the 20th century, especially the Home Rule Crisis
Home Rule Crisis
and the Troubles. While religion broadly marks the delineation of these divisions, the contentions were primarily political and related to access to power
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The Irish Catholic
The Irish Catholic
The Irish Catholic
is an Irish weekly Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
newspaper, providing news and commentary about the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church. The 32-page tabloid paper is delivered worldwide. The newspaper is managed by a private limited company and is independent of the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
hierarchy in Ireland.Contents1 History 2 Contributors 3 Polish content 4 Ownership and sale 5 Trivia 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Irish Catholic
The Irish Catholic
was founded in 1888 by Timothy Daniel Sullivan, a former Lord Mayor of Dublin
Lord Mayor of Dublin
and an Irish Parliamentary Party
Irish Parliamentary Party
(IPP) MP at Westminster
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Catholic Church In Ireland
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Church Of Ireland
The Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
(Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann[3]) is a Christian church
Christian church
in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican
Anglican
Communion. It is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second-largest Christian church
Christian church
on the island after the Catholic Church. Like other Anglican
Anglican
churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its episcopal polity, while rejecting the primacy of the Bishop of Rome. In theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many principles of the Reformation, particularly those espoused during the English Reformation
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Anglosphere
The Anglosphere
Anglosphere
is a set of English-speaking nations which share common roots in British culture and history,[1][2] which today maintain close cultural, political, diplomatic and military cooperation. While the nations included in different sources vary, the Anglosphere
Anglosphere
is usually not considered to include all countries where English is an official language, although the nations that are commonly included were all once part of the British Empire.[3] The term covers the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and the United Kingdom,[4][5][6][7] countries which in the post-British Empire era maintain a close affinity of cultural, diplomatic and military links with one another
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Great Famine (Ireland)
The Great Famine
Famine
(Irish: an Gorta Mór, [anˠ ˈgɔɾˠt̪ˠa mˠoːɾˠ]) or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland
Ireland
between 1845 and 1849.[1] It is sometimes referred to, mostly outside Ireland, as the Irish Potato Famine, because about two-fifths of the population was solely reliant on this cheap crop for a number of historical reasons.[2][3] During the famine, about one million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland,[4] causing the island's population to fall by between 20% and 25%.[5] The proximate cause of famine was potato blight,[6] which ravaged potato crops throughout Europe during the 1840s
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Know Nothing
The Native American Party, renamed the American Party in 1855 and commonly known as the Know Nothing
Know Nothing
movement, was an American nativist political party that operated nationally in the mid-1850s. It was primarily anti-Catholic, xenophobic and hostile to immigration, starting originally as a secret society. The movement briefly emerged as a major political party in the form of the American Party. Adherents to the movement were to reply "I know nothing" when asked about its specifics by outsiders, thus providing the group with its common name. The Know Nothings believed a "Romanist" conspiracy was afoot to subvert civil and religious liberty in the United States
United States
and sought to politically organize native-born Protestants in the defense of traditional religious and political values. It is remembered for this theme because of fears by Protestants that Catholic priests and bishops would control a large bloc of voters
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Anti-Catholic
Anti-Catholicism
Anti-Catholicism
is hostility towards Catholics or opposition to the Catholic Church, its clergy and its adherents.[1] After the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, some mostly Protestant
Protestant
states (for example the United Kingdom, the United States
United States
and Germany) made anti-Catholicism and opposition to the Pope
Pope
and Catholic rituals major political themes, with anti-Catholic sentiment at times leading to religious discrimination against Catholic individuals (often derogatorily referred to in Anglophone Protestant
Protestant
countries as "papists" or "Romanists")
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Anti-Irish Sentiment
Anti-Irish sentiment
Anti-Irish sentiment
(or Hibernophobia) may refer to or include racism, oppression, bigotry, persecution, discrimination, hatred or fear of Irish people
Irish people
as an ethnic group or nation, whether directed against Ireland
Ireland
in general or against Irish emigrants and their descendants in the Irish diaspora. It is traditionally rooted in the medieval period, and is also evidenced in Irish immigration to North America, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and Great Britain
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Celtic Christianity
Celtic Christianity
Christianity
or Insular Christianity
Christianity
refers broadly to certain features of
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Irish Diaspora
The Irish diaspora
Irish diaspora
(Irish: Diaspóra na nGael) refers to Irish people and their descendants who live outside Ireland. The phenomenon of migration from Ireland
Ireland
is recorded since early Medieval times,[1] but it is only possible to quantify it from around 1700: since then between 9 and 10 million people born in Ireland
Ireland
have emigrated. This is more than the population of Ireland
Ireland
at its historical peak in the 1840s of 8.5 million. The poorest of them went to Great Britain, especially Liverpool; those who could afford it went further, including almost 5 million to the United States.[2] After 1840, emigration from Ireland
Ireland
became a massive, relentless, and efficiently managed national enterprise.[3] In 1890 40% of Irish-born people were living abroad
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Presbyterians
Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
is a part of the Reformed tradition
Reformed tradition
within Protestantism
Protestantism
which traces its origins to the British Isles, particularly Scotland. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government, which is governed by representative assemblies of elders. A great number of Reformed churches
Reformed churches
are organized this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied uniquely to churches that trace their roots to the Scottish and English Presbyterians, as well as several English dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.[2] Presbyterian theology typically emphasizes the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures, and the necessity of grace through faith in Christ
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Irish-Scots
Irish-Scots
Irish-Scots
are people in Scotland
Scotland
who are of immediate or traceably distinct Irish ancestry. Although migration between Ireland
Ireland
and Scotland
Scotland
has an established history - in both directions - owing to their close proximity, Irish migration to Scotland
Scotland
increased in the nineteenth century, and was highest following the Great Famine
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Penal Laws (Ireland)
In the island of Ireland, Penal Laws (Irish: Na Péindlíthe) were a series of laws imposed in an attempt to force Irish Roman Catholics and Protestant dissenters (such as local Presbyterians) to accept the reformed denomination as defined by the English state established Anglican Church
Anglican Church
and practised[1] by members of the Irish state established Church of Ireland.[2] All remaining penal laws were finally repealed by the
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Saint Patrick's Day
Saint Patrick's Day, or the Feast of Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick
(Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, "the Day of the Festival of Patrick"), is a cultural and religious celebration held on 17 March, the traditional death date of Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick
(c. AD 385–461), the foremost patron saint of Ireland. Saint Patrick's Day
Saint Patrick's Day
was made an official Christian feast day in the early 17th century and is observed by the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
(especially the Church of Ireland[4]), the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Lutheran Church
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