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Iranian Folklore
Iranian folklore
Iranian folklore
encompasses the folk traditions that have evolved in Iran.Contents1 Oral legends1.1 Folktales 1.2 Heroes1.2.1 Heroes in Šāhnāme 1.2.2 Other heroes1.3 Characters in jokes 1.4 Creatures 1.5 Locations2 Social beliefs and practices 3 Ceremonies 4 Folk-games 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksOral legends[edit]A storytelling performance of the stories of Šāhnāme, the Iranian national epic, in Qazvin, Iran.Folktales[edit]
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National Epic
A national epic is an epic poem or a literary work of epic scope which seeks or is believed to capture and express the essence or spirit of a particular nation; not necessarily a nation state, but at least an ethnic or linguistic group with aspirations to independence or autonomy. National epics frequently recount the origin of a nation, a part of its history, or a crucial event in the development of national identity such as other national symbols. In a broader sense, a national epic may simply be an epic in the national language which the people or government of that nation are particularly proud of. It is distinct from a pan-national epic which is taken as representative of a larger cultural or linguistic group than a nation or a nation-state.Contents1 History 2 Poetic epics2.1 Africa 2.2 Americas 2.3 Asia 2.4 Europe 2.5 Oceania3 Prose epics 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]First page of Beowulf
Beowulf
in Cotton Vitellius A
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Nizami Ganjavi
Nizami Mausoleum • Nizami Museum of Azerbaijani Literature • Nizami Gəncəvi ( Baku
Baku
Metro) • in Ganja • in Baku • in Beijing • in Chișinău • in Rome • in Saint Petersburg • in Tashkentv t e Nizami Ganjavi
Nizami Ganjavi
(Persian: نظامی گنجوی‎, translit. Niẓāmī Ganjavī, lit. 'Niẓāmī of Ganja') (1141 to 1209), Nizami Ganje'i,[2] Nizami,[3] or Nezāmi, whose formal name was Jamal ad-Dīn Abū Muḥammad Ilyās ibn-Yūsuf ibn-Zakkī,[4] was a 12th-century Persian[2][5][6][7][8][9] Sunni[10] Muslim
Muslim
poet
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Folklore
Folklore
Folklore
is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales, proverbs and jokes. They include material culture, ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore
Folklore
also includes customary lore, the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas
Christmas
and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact. Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next
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Shahnameh
The Shahnameh, also transliterated as Shahnama
Shahnama
(Persian: شاهنامه‎ pronounced [ʃɒːhnɒːˈme], "The Book
Book
of Kings"), is a long epic poem written by the Persian poet Ferdowsi between c. 977 and 1010 CE and is the national epic of Greater Iran. Consisting of some 50,000 "distichs" or couplets (two-line verses),[1] the Shahnameh
Shahnameh
is the world's longest epic poem written by a single poet. It tells mainly the mythical and to some extent the historical past of the Persian Empire
Persian Empire
from the creation of the world until the Islamic conquest of Persia
Islamic conquest of Persia
in the 7th century
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Qazvin
Qazvin
Qazvin
(/kæzˈviːn/; Persian: قزوین‎, IPA: [ɢæzˈviːn] ( listen), also Romanized as Qazvīn, Caspin, Qazwin, or Ghazvin) is the largest city and capital of the Province of Qazvin
Qazvin
in Iran. Qazvin
Qazvin
was an ancient capital in the Safavid
Safavid
dynasty and nowadays is known as the calligraphy capital of Iran. It is famous for its Baghlava, carpet patterns, poets, political newspaper and pahlavi (Middle Persian) influence on its accent. At the 2011 census, its population was 381,598.[1] Located in 150 km (93 mi) northwest of Tehran, in the Qazvin Province, it is at an altitude of about 1,800 m (5,900 ft) above sea level
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Storytelling
Storytelling
Storytelling
describes the social and cultural activity of sharing stories, sometimes with improvisation, theatrics, or embellishment. Every culture has its own stories or narratives, which are shared as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation or instilling moral values.[1] Crucial elements of stories and storytelling include plot, characters and narrative point of view. The term "storytelling" can refer in a narrow sense specifically to oral storytelling and also in a looser sense to techniques used in other media to unfold or disclose the narrative of a story.Contents1
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Gusans
Gusans (Armenian: գուսան; Parthian for poet-musician or minstrel) were creative and performing artists - singers, instrumentalists, dancers, storytellers, and professional folk actors in public theaters of Parthia and ancient and medieval Armenia. The word gusan is first mentioned in early Armenian texts of V c., e.g. Faustus of Byzantium, Moses of Chorene, etc. In Parsian language the earliest known evidence is from Vis o Rāmin by Fakhruddin As'ad Gurgani in the eleventh century. It was originally thought to have been a personal name. However in the 19th century Kerope Patkanov identified it as a common word possibly meaning "musician" and suggested that it was an obsolete Persian term, currently found in a form of a loanword in Armenian. In 1934 Harold Walter Bailey linked to origin of the word to the Parthian language. In Hrachia Acharian's opinion the word was borrowed into Parthian from Armenian govasan "praiser",[1] then borrowed back into Armenian as gusan
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Parthian Language
The Parthian language, also known as Arsacid Pahlavi and Pahlawānīg, is a now-extinct ancient Northwestern Iranian language spoken in Parthia, a region of northeastern ancient Iran. Parthian was the language of state of the Arsacid Parthian Empire (248 BC – 224 AD), as well as of its eponymous branches of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia, Arsacid dynasty of Iberia, and the Arsacid dynasty of Caucasian Albania. This language had a huge impact on Armenian, a large part of whose vocabulary was formed primarily from borrowings from Parthian. Many ancient Parthian words were preserved, and now can be seen only in Armenian.Contents1 Classification 2 Written Parthian 3 Attestations 4 Extinction 5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 General references7 External linksClassification[edit] Parthian was a Western Middle Iranian language. Language contact made it share some features of the Eastern Iranian language group, the influence of which is attested primarily in loanwords
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Middle Persian
Middle Persian
Middle Persian
is the Middle Iranian language or ethnolect of southwestern Iran
Iran
that during the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
(224–654) became a prestige dialect and so came to be spoken in other regions of the empire as well. Middle Persian
Middle Persian
is classified as a Western Iranian language. It descends from Old Persian
Old Persian
and is the linguistic ancestor of Modern Persian. Traces of Middle Persian, or Parsik, are found in remnants of Sasanian inscriptions and Egyptian papyri, coins and seals, fragments of Manichaean writings, and treatises and Zoroastrian books from the Sasanian era, as well as in the post-Sasanian Zoroastrian variant of the language sometimes known as Pahlavi, which originally referred to the Pahlavi scripts,[2][3] and that was also the preferred writing system for several other Middle Iranian languages
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Poetry Reading
A poetry reading is a public oral recitation or performance of poetry.Contents1 Background 2 History 3 Poetry
Poetry
slam 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Voice is an active, physical thing in oral poetry. It needs a speaker and a listener, a performer and an audience. It is a bodily creation that thrives in live connection
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Darius III Of Persia
Darius III
Darius III
(c. 380 – July 330 BC), originally named Artashata and called Codomannus by the Greeks,[1] was the last king of the Achaemenid Empire
Achaemenid Empire
of Persia
Persia
from 336 BC to 330 BC. Artashata adopted Darius as a dynastic name.[1] His empire was unstable, with large portions governed by jealous and unreliable satraps and inhabited by disaffected and rebellious subjects. In 334 BC, Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
began his invasion of the Persian Empire and subsequently defeated the Persians in a number of battles before looting and destroying their capital, Persepolis, by fire in 330 BC. With the Persian Empire now effectively under Alexander's control, Alexander then decided to pursue Darius
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Coffeehouse
A coffeehouse, coffee shop or café (sometimes spelt cafe) is an establishment which primarily serves hot coffee, related coffee beverages (café latte, cappuccino, espresso), tea, and other hot beverages. Some coffeehouses also serve cold beverages such as iced coffee and iced tea. Many cafés also serve some type of food, such as light snacks, muffins or pastries. Coffeehouses range from owner-operated. small businesses to large multinational corporations. In continental Europe, cafés often serve alcoholic beverages and light food, but elsewhere the term "café" may also refer to a tea room, "greasy spoon" (a small and inexpensive restaurant, colloquially called a "caff"), transport café, or other casual eating and drinking place.[1][2][3][4][5] A coffeehouse may share some of the same characteristics of a bar or restaurant, but it is different from a cafeteria
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Esfand
Esfand (Persian: اسفند‎, Persian pronunciation: [esˈfænd][1]) is the twelfth and final month of the Iranian calendar.[1] Esfand has twenty-nine days[1] normally, and thirty during leap years[citation needed]
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Moses
Moses
Moses
(/ˈmoʊzɪz, -zɪs/)[2][Note 1] was a prophet in the Abrahamic religions. According to the Hebrew Bible, he was adopted by an Egyptian princess, and later in life became the leader of the Israelites
Israelites
and lawgiver, to whom the authorship of the Torah, or acquisition of the Torah
Torah
from Heaven is traditionally attributed
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The Wolf And The Seven Young Goats
"The Wolf and the Seven Young Goats" (German: Der Wolf und die sieben jungen Geißlein) is a fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm, tale number 5.[1] It is Aarne-Thompson type 123,[2] but has a strong resemblance to The Three Little Pigs and other Aarne-Thomspson type 124 folktales, and to the variant of Little Red Riding Hood that the Grimms collected, where she is rescued.[3]Contents1 Synopsis 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksSynopsis[edit] A mother goat leaves her seven children at home while she ventures into the forest to find food. Before she leaves, she warns her young about the Big Bad Wolf who will try to sneak into the house and gobble them up. The wolf will pretend to be their mother and convince the kids to open the door. The young children will be able to recognize their true mother by her white feet and sweet voice. The mother goat leaves and the seven kids stay in the house
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