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Iranian Cuisine
Iranian cuisine, also known as Persian cuisine[1][2][3][4][5][6], includes all the cooking methods and food traditions of Iran. Iranian culinary styles have shared historical interactions with the cuisines of the neighboring regions, including Caucasian cuisine, Turkish cuisine, Levantine cuisine, Greek cuisine, Central Asian cuisine, and Russian cuisine.[7][8][9][10] Through the Persianized Central Asian Mughal dynasty, aspects of Iranian cuisine
Iranian cuisine
were adopted into North Indian and Pakistani cuisine.[11][12] Typical Iranian main dishes are combinations of rice with meat (such as lamb, chicken, or fish), vegetables (such as onions and various herbs), and nuts. Fresh green herbs are frequently used, along with fruits such as plums, pomegranates, quince, prunes, apricots, and raisins
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Raisin
A raisin is a dried grape. Raisins are produced in many regions of the world and may be eaten raw or used in cooking, baking, and brewing. In the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, the word "raisin" is reserved for the dark-colored dried large grape,[1] with "sultana" being a golden-colored dried grape, and "currant" being a dried small Black Corinth
Black Corinth
seedless[2] grape.[3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Varieties 3 Nutrition 4 Toxicity in pets 5 Sugars5.1 Grades in the United States6 Raisin
Raisin
production6.1 Pre-treatment 6.2 Drying 6.3 Post-drying processes 6.4 Nutrition and health7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingEtymology[edit] The word "raisin" dates back to Middle English
Middle English
and is a loanword from Old French; in modern French, raisin means "grape", while a dried grape is a raisin sec, or "dry grape"
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Chicken As Food
Chicken
Chicken
is the most common type of poultry in the world.[1] In developed countries, chickens are typically subject to intensive farming methods.Contents1 History 2 Breeding 3 Edible components 4 Health4.1 Use of Roxarsone
Roxarsone
in chicken production 4.2 Antibiotic resistance 4
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List Of Dishes From The Caucasus
 Abkhazia Artsakh South OssetiaAutonomous republics and federal regions Russia Adygea  Chechnya  Dagestan  Ingushetia  Kabardino-Balkaria Karachay-Cherkessia  Krasnodar Krai North Ossetia-Alania  Stavropol Krai Georgia Adjara Abkhazia (since 2008, in exile) Azerbaijan NakhchivanDemonym CaucasianTime Zones UTC+02:00, UTC+03:00, UTC+03:30, UTC+4:00, UTC+04:30The Caucasus
Caucasus
/ˈkɔːkəsəs/ or Caucasia /kɔːˈkeɪʒə/ is a region located at the border of
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Apricot
An apricot is a fruit, or the tree that bears the fruit, of several species in the genus Prunus
Prunus
(stone fruits). Usually, an apricot tree is from the species P. armeniaca, but the species P. brigantina, P. mandshurica, P. mume, and P. sibirica are closely related, have similar fruit, and are also called apricots.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Cultivation and uses3.1 History 3.2 Cultivation practices 3.3 Pests and diseases4 Production 5 Nutrition5.1 Dried apricots 5.2 Phytochemicals6 In culture 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The scientific name armeniaca was first used by Gaspard Bauhin
Gaspard Bauhin
in his Pinax Theatri Botanici (1623), referring to the species as Mala armeniaca "Armenian apple"
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Name Of Iran
In the Western world, Persia (or one of its cognates) was historically the common name for Iran. On the Nowruz
Nowruz
of 1935, Reza Shah
Reza Shah
Pahlavi asked foreign delegates to use the term Iran, the endonym of the country, in formal correspondence. Since then, in the Western World, the use of the word "Iran" has become more common. This also changed the usage of the terms for Iranian nationality, and the common adjective for citizens of Iran
Iran
changed from "Persian" to "Iranian"
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Quince
C. vulgarisThe quince (/kwɪns/; Cydonia oblonga) is the sole member of the genus Cydonia in the family Rosaceae
Rosaceae
(which also contains apples and pears, among other fruits). It is a deciduous tree that bears a pome fruit, similar in appearance to a pear, and bright golden-yellow when mature. Throughout history the cooked fruit has been used as food, but the tree is also grown for its attractive pale pink blossoms and other ornamental qualities.Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Distribution and habitat 4 History 5 Pests and diseases 6 Cultivation 7 Cultivars 8 Production 9 Uses9.1 As food 9.2 As drink 9.3 Ornamental10 Cultural associations 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksDescription[edit]Halved quince, with seeds and oxidation visible.The tree grows 5 to 8 m (16 to 26 ft) high and 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) wide
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Sport In Iran
Many sports are practiced in Iran, both traditional and modern. Tehran, for example, was the first city in West Asia to host the Asian Games in 1974, and continues to host and participate in major international sporting events to this day. Freestyle wrestling
Freestyle wrestling
has been traditionally regarded as Iran's national sport, however today, football is the most popular sport in Iran
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Persianization
Persianization /ˌpɜːrʒəˌnaɪˈzeɪʃən/ or persification /ˌpɜːrsɪfɪˈkeɪʃən/ is a sociological process of cultural change in which something becomes "Persianate"
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Mughal Empire
The Mughal Empire
Empire
(Urdu: مغلیہ سلطنت‬‎, translit. Mughliyah Saltanat)[8][2] or Mogul Empire[9] was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526
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Meat
Meat
Meat
is animal flesh that is eaten as food.[1]:1 Humans have hunted and killed animals for meat since prehistoric times. The advent of civilization allowed the domestication of animals such as chickens, sheep, rabbits, pigs and cattle. This eventually led to their use in meat production on an industrial scale with the aid of slaughterhouses. Meat
Meat
is mainly composed of water, protein, and fat. It is edible raw, but is normally eaten after it has been cooked and seasoned or processed in a variety of ways. Unprocessed meat will spoil or rot within hours or days as a result of infection with and decomposition by bacteria and fungi. Meat
Meat
is important in economy and culture, even though its mass production and consumption has been determined to pose risks for human health and the environment
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Lamb And Mutton
Lamb, hogget, and mutton[1] are the meat of domestic sheep (species Ovis aries) at different ages. A sheep in its first year is called a lamb, and its meat is also called lamb. The meat of a juvenile sheep older than one year is hogget; outside the USA this is also a term for the living animal.[2] The meat of an adult sheep is mutton, a term only used for the meat, not the living animals. In the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
the term mutton is also used to refer to goat meat.[3] Lamb is the most expensive of the three types, and in recent decades sheep meat is increasingly only retailed as "lamb", sometimes stretching the accepted distinctions given above. The stronger-tasting mutton is now hard to find in many areas, despite the efforts of the Mutton Renaissance Campaign
Mutton Renaissance Campaign
in the UK
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Fish As Food
Many species of fish are consumed as food in virtually all regions around the world. Fish
Fish
has been an important source of protein and other nutrients for humans from time immemorial. In culinary and fishery contexts, fish may include shellfish, such as molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms. English does not distinguish between fish as an animal and the food prepared from it, as it does with pig vs. pork or cow vs. beef.[1] Some other languages do, as in the Spanish peces versus pescado. The modern English word for fish comes from the Old English
Old English
word fisc (plural: fiscas) which was pronounced as it is today
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Irreligion In Iran
Irreligion in Iran
Iran
is marginalized and by official 2011 census 265,899 persons didn't state any religion (0.3% of total population).[1] However, in reality the number of nonpracticing Muslims is significantly higher.[2] Non-religious Iranians are officially unrecognized by the government, and one must declare oneself as a member of one of the four recognized faiths in order to avail oneself of many of the rights of citizenship.[3][4] Citizens of the Islamic Republic of Iran
Iran
are officially divided into four categories: Muslims, Zoroastrians, Jews
Jews
and Christians. This official division ignores other religious minorities in Iran, notably those of the Bahá'í faith. Bahá’ís are a "non-recognized" religious minority without any legal existence. They are classified as "unprotected infidels" by the authorities, and are subject to systematic discrimination on the basis of their beliefs
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Religion In Iran
According to the CIA World Factbook, around 90–95%[1] of Iranians associate themselves with the Shia
Shia
branch of Islam, the official state religion, and about 5–10% with the Sunni
Sunni
and
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Onion
The onion ( Allium
Allium
cepa L., from Latin cepa "onion"), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. Its close relatives include the garlic, shallot, leek, chive,[2] and Chinese onion.[3] This genus also contains several other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food, such as the Japanese bunching onion ( Allium
Allium
fistulosum), the tree onion (A. ×proliferum), and the Canada onion ( Allium
Allium
canadense). The name "wild onion" is applied to a number of Allium
Allium
species, but A. cepa is exclusively known from cultivation
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