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Ipsus
The Battle of Ipsus
Battle of Ipsus
(Ancient Greek: Ἱψός) was fought between some of the Diadochi
Diadochi
(the successors of Alexander the Great) in 301 BC near the village of that name in Phrygia
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Parium
Parium (or Parion; Greek: Πάριον) was a Greek city of Adrasteia in Mysia
Mysia
on the Hellespont. Its bishopric was a suffragan of Cyzicus, the metropolitan see of the Roman province
Roman province
of Hellespontus.Contents1 History 2 Christian history 3 Archaeology 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion is located in the village of Kemer in the township of Biga in Çanakkale
Çanakkale
province of Turkey, currently. A major coastal city with two harbors in the Roman period, Parion had intensive relations with Thrace
Thrace
and Anatolia throughout history
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Anatolia
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Cyprus
Cyprus,[f] officially the Republic of Cyprus,[g] is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean. Cyprus
Cyprus
is located south of Turkey, west of Syria
Syria
and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece. The earliest known human activity on the island dates to around the 10th millennium BC. Archaeological remains from this period include the well-preserved Neolithic
Neolithic
village of Khirokitia, and Cyprus
Cyprus
is home to some of the oldest water wells in the world.[9] Cyprus
Cyprus
was settled by Mycenaean Greeks in two waves in the 2nd millennium BC
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Aegean Sea
The Aegean Sea
Sea
(/ɪˈdʒiːən/; Greek: Αιγαίο Πέλαγος [eˈʝeo ˈpelaɣos] ( listen); Turkish: Ege Denizi Turkish pronunciation: [eɟe denizi])[stress?] is an elongated embayment of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
located between the Greek and Anatolian peninsulas, i.e., between the mainlands of Greece
Greece
and Turkey. In the north, the Aegean is connected to the Marmara Sea
Sea
and Black Sea
Sea
by the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
and Bosphorus
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Suzerainty
Suzerainty (/ˈsjuːzərənti/, /ˈsjuːzərɛnti/ and /ˈsjuːzrənti/) is a back-formation from the late 18th-century word suzerain, meaning upper-sovereign, derived from the French sus (meaning above) + -erain (from souverain, meaning sovereign). It was first used to refer to the dominant position of the Ottoman Empire in relation to its surrounding regions; the Ottoman Empire being the suzerain, and the relationship being suzerainty
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Satrap
Satraps were the governors of the provinces of the ancient Median and Achaemenid Empires and in several of their successors, such as in the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
and the Hellenistic empires. The word satrap is also often used metaphorically in modern literature to refer to world leaders or governors who are heavily influenced by larger world superpowers or hegemonies and act as their surrogates.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Medo-Persian satraps 3 Hellenistic satraps 4 Parthian and Sassanian satraps 5 Western satraps 6 S
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Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
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Hieronymus Of Cardia
Hieronymus of Cardia (Greek: Ἱερώνυμος ὁ Καρδιανός, 354–250 BC), Greek general and historian from Cardia in Thrace, was a contemporary of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
(356–323 BC). After the death of Alexander he followed the fortunes of his friend and fellow-countryman (according to Historie, his step-brother) Eumenes. He was wounded and taken prisoner by Antigonus, who pardoned him and appointed him superintendent of the asphalt beds in the Dead Sea
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Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
(/ˌdaɪəˈdɔːrəs ˈsɪkjʊləs/; Greek: Διόδωρος Σικελιώτης Diodoros Sikeliotes) (fl. 1st century BC) or Diodorus of Sicily
Sicily
was a Greek historian. He is known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica, much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. It is arranged in three parts. The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troy, arranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India
India
and Arabia
Arabia
to Greece
Greece
and Europe. The second covers the Trojan War
Trojan War
to the death of Alexander the Great. The third covers the period to about 60 BC
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Babylonia
Babylonia
Babylonia
(/ˌbæbəˈloʊniə, -ˈloʊnjə/) was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
(present-day Iraq). A small Amorite-ruled state emerged in 1894 BC, which contained the minor administrative town of Babylon.[1] It was merely a small provincial town during the Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire (2335–2154 BC) but greatly expanded during the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
in the first half of the 18th century BC and became a major capital city. During the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
and afterwards, Babylonia
Babylonia
was called "the country of Akkad" (Māt Akkadī in Akkadian).[2][3] It was often involved in rivalry with the older state of Assyria
Assyria
to the north and Elam
Elam
to the east in Ancient Iran
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Thrace
Thrace
Thrace
(/θreɪs/; Modern Greek: Θράκη, Thráke; Bulgarian: Тракия, Trakiya; Turkish: Trakya) is a geographical and historical area in southeast Europe, now split between Bulgaria, Greece
Greece
and Turkey, which is bounded by the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
to the north, the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the south and the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the east
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Alexander The Great
Alexander
Alexander
III of Macedon
Macedon
(20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander
Alexander
the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, translit. Aléxandros ho Mégas, Koine
Koine
Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon[a] and a member of the Argead
Argead
dynasty. He was born in Pella
Pella
in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of twenty
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Rhodes
Rhodes
Rhodes
(Greek: Ρόδος, Ródos [ˈroðos]) is the largest of the Dodecanese
Dodecanese
islands of Greece
Greece
in terms of land area and also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within the Rhodes
Rhodes
regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean
South Aegean
administrative region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Rhodes.[1] The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011
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