HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ion
An ion (/ˈaɪən, -ɒn/)[1] is an atom or molecule that has a non-zero net electrical charge (its total number of electrons is not equal to its total number of protons). A cation is a positively-charged ion, while an anion is negatively charged. Because of their opposite electric charges, cations and anions attract each other and readily form ionic compounds, such as salts. Ions can be created by chemical means, such as the dissolution of a salt into water, or by physical means, such as passing a direct current through a conducting solution, which will dissolve the anode via ionization. Ions consisting of only a single atom are atomic or monatomic ions
[...More...]

"Ion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Voltage
Voltage, electric potential difference, electric pressure or electric tension (formally denoted ∆V or ∆U, but more often simply as V or U, for instance in the context of Ohm's or Kirchhoff's circuit laws) is the difference in electric potential between two points. The voltage between two points is equal to the work done per unit of charge against a static electric field to move a test charge between two points
[...More...]

"Voltage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Adenosine Triphosphate
Adenosine
Adenosine
triphosphate (ATP) is a complex organic chemical that participates in many processes. Found in all forms of life, ATP
ATP
is often referred to as the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer.[1] When consumed in metabolic processes, it converts to either the di- or monophosphates, respectively ADP and AMP. Other processes regenerate ATP
ATP
such that the human body recycles its own body weight equivalent in ATP
ATP
each day.[2] It is also a precursor to DNA and RNA. From the perspective of biochemistry, ATP
ATP
is classified as a nucleoside triphosphate, which indicates that it consists of three components, a nitrogenous base (adenine), the sugar ribose, and the triphosphate
[...More...]

"Adenosine Triphosphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gemstone
A gemstone (also called a gem, fine gem, jewel, precious stone, or semi-precious stone) is a piece of mineral crystal which, in cut and polished form, is used to make jewelry or other adornments.[1][2] However, certain rocks (such as lapis lazuli, opal, and jade) or organic materials that are not minerals (such as amber, jet, and pearl) are also used for jewelry and are therefore often considered to be gemstones as well. Most gemstones are hard, but some soft minerals are used in jewelry because of their luster or other physical properties that have aesthetic value. Rarity is another characteristic that lends value to a gemstone. Apart from jewelry, from earliest antiquity engraved gems and hardstone carvings, such as cups, were major luxury art forms. A gem maker is called a lapidary or gemcutter; a diamond worker is a diamantaire
[...More...]

"Gemstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Biocides
A biocide is defined in the European legislation as a chemical substance or microorganism intended to destroy, deter, render harmless, or exert a controlling effect on any harmful organism by chemical or biological means. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses a slightly different definition for biocides as "a diverse group of poisonous substances including preservatives, insecticides, disinfectants, and pesticides used for the control of organisms that are harmful to human or animal health or that cause damage to natural or manufactured products". When compared, the two definitions roughly imply the same, although the US EPA definition includes plant protection products and some veterinary medicines. The terms "biocides" and "pesticides" are regularly interchanged, and often confused with "plant protection products"
[...More...]

"Biocides" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matter Waves
Matter
Matter
waves are a central part of the theory of quantum mechanics, being an example of wave–particle duality. All matter can exhibit wave-like behavior. For example, a beam of electrons can be diffracted just like a beam of light or a water wave. The concept that matter behaves like a wave was proposed by Louis de Broglie
Louis de Broglie
(/dəˈbrɔɪ/) in 1924. It is also referred to as the de Broglie hypothesis.[1] Matter
Matter
waves are referred to as de Broglie waves. The de Broglie wavelength is the wavelength, λ, associated with a massive particle and is related to its momentum, p, through the Planck constant, h: λ = h p = h m v . displaystyle lambda = frac h p = frac h mv
[...More...]

"Matter Waves" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Magnetic Field
A magnetic field is a force field that is created by moving electric charges (electric currents) and magnetic dipoles, and exerts a force on other nearby moving charges and magnetic dipoles. At any given point, it has a direction and a magnitude (or strength), so it is represented by a vector field. The term is used for two distinct but closely related fields denoted by the symbols B and H, where, in the International System of Units, H is measured in units of amperes per meter and B is measured in teslas or newtons per meter per ampere. H is a field introduced to account for the effects of magnetization, which is due to the presence of magnetic dipoles in materials
[...More...]

"Magnetic Field" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Direct Current
Direct current
Direct current
(DC) is the unidirectional flow of electric charge. A battery is a good example of a DC power supply. Direct current
Direct current
may flow in a conductor such as a wire, but can also flow through semiconductors, insulators, or even through a vacuum as in electron or ion beams. The electric current flows in a constant direction, distinguishing it from alternating current (AC). A term formerly used for this type of current was galvanic current.[1] The abbreviations AC and DC are often used to mean simply alternating and direct, as when they modify current or voltage.[2][3] Direct current
Direct current
may be obtained from an alternating current supply by use of a rectifier, which contains electronic elements (usually) or electromechanical elements (historically) that allow current to flow only in one direction
[...More...]

"Direct Current" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Entropy
In statistical mechanics, entropy (usual symbol S) is related to the number of microscopic configurations Ω that a thermodynamic system can have when in a state as specified by some macroscopic variables. Specifically, assuming for simplicity that each of the microscopic configurations is equally probable, the entropy of the system is the natural logarithm of that number of configurations, multiplied by the Boltzmann constant
Boltzmann constant
kB. Formally, S = k B ln ⁡ Ω  (assuming equiprobable states) . displaystyle S=k_ mathrm B ln Omega text (assuming equiprobable states) . This is consistent with 19th-century formulas for entropy in terms of heat and temperature, as discussed below
[...More...]

"Entropy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electron Cloud
In quantum mechanics, an atomic orbital is a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom.[1] This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom's nucleus. The term atomic orbital may also refer to the physical region or space where the electron can be calculated to be present, as defined by the particular mathematical form of the orbital.[2] Each orbital in an atom is characterized by a unique set of values of the three quantum numbers n, ℓ, and m, which respectively correspond to the electron's energy, angular momentum, and an angular momentum vector component (the magnetic quantum number). Each such orbital can be occupied by a maximum of two electrons, each with its own spin quantum number s
[...More...]

"Electron Cloud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Optical Emission Spectrometer
Atomic emission spectroscopy
Atomic emission spectroscopy
(AES) is a method of chemical analysis that uses the intensity of light emitted from a flame, plasma, arc, or spark at a particular wavelength to determine the quantity of an element in a sample
[...More...]

"Optical Emission Spectrometer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nature
Nature, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, or material world or universe. "Nature" can refer to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general. The study of nature is a large, if not the only, part of science
[...More...]

"Nature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anyon
In physics, an anyon is a type of quasiparticle that occurs only in two-dimensional systems, with properties much less restricted than fermions and bosons. In general, the operation of exchanging two identical particles may cause a global phase shift but cannot affect observables. Anyons are generally classified as abelian or non-abelian. Abelian anyons have been detected and play a major role in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Non-abelian anyons have not been definitively detected, although this is an active area of research.Contents1 Abelian anyons1.1 Topological
Topological
equivalence 1.2 Experiment2 Non-abelian anyons 3 Topological
Topological
basis 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingAbelian anyons[edit] In space of three or more dimensions, elementary particles are either fermions or bosons, according to their statistical behaviour
[...More...]

"Anyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hydrogen Atom
Hydrogen
Hydrogen
atom Complete table of nuclidesGeneralName, symbol protium, 1HNeutrons 0Protons 1Nuclide dataNatural abundance 99.985% Isotope
Isotope
mass 1.007825 uSpin 1/2Excess energy 7288.969± 0.001 keVBinding energy 0.000± 0.0000 keVDepiction of a hydrogen atom showing the diameter as about twice the Bohr model
Bohr model
radius. (Image not to scale)A hydrogen atom is an atom of the chemical element hydrogen. The electrically neutral atom contains a single positively charged proton and a single negatively charged electron bound to the nucleus by the Coulomb force. Atomic hydrogen constitutes about 75% of the baryonic mass of the universe.[1] In everyday life on Earth, isolated hydrogen atoms (called "atomic hydrogen") are extremely rare. Instead, hydrogen tends to combine with other atoms in compounds, or with itself to form ordinary (diatomic) hydrogen gas, H2
[...More...]

"Hydrogen Atom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dissociation (chemistry)
Dissociation in chemistry and biochemistry is a general process in which molecules (or ionic compounds such as salts, or complexes) separate or split into smaller particles such as atoms, ions or radicals, usually in a reversible manner. For instance, when an acid dissolves in water, a covalent bond between an electronegative atom and a hydrogen atom is broken by heterolytic fission, which gives a proton (H+) and a negative ion
[...More...]

"Dissociation (chemistry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proton
6973167262189800000♠1.672621898(21)×10−27 kg[1] 7002938272081300000♠938.2720813(58) MeV/c2[2] 7000100727646687900♠1.007276466879(91) u[2]Mean lifetime > 7036662709600000000♠2.1×1029 years (stable)Electric charge 6981160217648700000♠+1 e 6981160217662079999♠1.6021766208(98)×10−19 C[2]Charge radius 6999875100000000000♠0.8751(61) fm[2]Electric dipole moment < 6976540000000000000♠5.4×10−24 e⋅cmElectric polarizability 6997119999999999999♠1.20(6)×10−3 fm3Magnetic moment6974141060678730000♠1.4106067873(97)×10−26 J⋅T−1[2] 6997152103220530000♠1.5210322053(46)×10−3 μB[2] 7000279284735079999♠2.7928473508(85) μN[2]Magnetic polarizability 6996190000000000000♠1.9(5)×10−4 fm3Spin 1/2Isospin 1/2Parity +1Condensed I(JP) = 1/2(1/2+)A proton is a subatomic
[...More...]

"Proton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.