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Internet
The Internet
Internet
is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite
Internet protocol suite
(TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies
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Index Of Internet-related Articles
Index
Index
may refer to:Contents1 Arts, entertainment, and media1.1 Fictional entities 1.2 Periodicals and news portals 1.3 Other arts, entertainment and media2 Business enterprises and events 3 Finance 4 Places 5 Publishing and library studies 6 Science, technology, and mathematics6.1 Computer science 6.2 Economics 6.3 Mathematics and statistics6.3.1 Algebra 6.3.2 Analysis 6.3.3 Statistics6.4 Other uses in science and technology7 Other uses 8 See alsoArts, entertainment, and media[edit] Fictional entities[edit]Index, a character from the Japanese light novel, anime and manga A Certain Mag
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Microblogging
Microblogging is an online broadcast medium that exists as a specific form of blogging. A microblog differs from a traditional blog in that its content is typically smaller in both actual and aggregated file size. Microblogs "allow users to exchange small elements of content such as short sentences, individual images, or video links",[1] which may be the major reason for their popularity.[2] These small messages are sometimes called microposts.[1][3] As with traditional blogging, microbloggers post about topics ranging from the simple, such as "what I'm doing right now," to the thematic, such as "sports cars." Commercial microblogs also exist to promote websites, services and products, and to promote collaboration within an organization. Some microblogging services offer features such as privacy settings, which allow users to control who can read their microblogs, or alternative ways of publishing entries besides the web-based interface
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Nanonetwork
A nanonetwork or nanoscale network is a set of interconnected nanomachines (devices a few hundred nanometers or a few micrometers at most in size), which are able to perform only very simple tasks such as computing, data storing, sensing and actuation.[1][2] Nanonetworks are expected to expand the capabilities of single nanomachines both in terms of complexity and range of operation by allowing them to coordinate, share and fuse information. Nanonetworks enable new applications of nanotechnology in the biomedical field, environmental research, military technology and industrial and consumer goods applications. Nanoscale communication is defined in IEEE P1906.1.Contents1 Communication approaches1.1 Electromagnetic 1.2 Molecular2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCommunication approaches[edit] Classical communication paradigms need to be revised for the nanoscale
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Near Field Communication
Near-field communication
Near-field communication
(NFC) is a set of communication protocols that enable two electronic devices, one of which is usually a portable device such as a smartphone, to establish communication by bringing them within 4 cm (1.6 in) of each other.[1] NFC devices are used in contactless payment systems, similar to those used in credit cards and electronic ticket smartcards and allow mobile payment to replace/supplement these systems. This is sometimes referred to as NFC/CTLS (Contactless) or CTLS NFC. NFC is used for social networking, for sharing contacts, photos, videos or files.[2] NFC-enabled devices can act as electronic identity documents and keycards.[3] NFC offers a low-speed connection with simple setup that can be used to bootstrap more capable wireless connections.[3]The Secure Element chip. This is an NFC chip that contains data such as the SEID (Secure Element Identifier) for secure transactions
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Body Area Network
A body area network (BAN), also referred to as a wireless body area network (WBAN) or a body sensor network (BSN), is a wireless network of wearable computing devices.[1][2][3][4][5] BAN devices may be embedded inside the body, implants, may be surface-mounted on the body in a fixed position Wearable technology
Wearable technology
or may be accompanied devices which humans can carry in different positions, in clothes pockets, by hand or in various bags.[6] Whilst there is a trend towards the miniaturization of devices, in particular, networks consisting of several miniaturized body sensor units (BSUs) together with a single body central unit (BCU).[7][8] Larger decimeter (tab and pad) sized smart devices, accompanied devices, still play an important role in terms of acting as a data hub, data gateway and providing a user interface to view and manage BAN applications, in-situ
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Online Game
An online game is a video game that is either partially or primarily played through the Internet
Internet
or any other computer network available .[1] Online games are ubiquitous on modern gaming platforms, including PCs, consoles and mobile devices, and span many genres, including first-person shooters, strategy games and massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPG).[2] The design of online games can range from simple text-based environments to the incorporation of complex graphics and virtual worlds.[3] The existence of online components within a game can range from being minor features, such as an online leaderboard, to being part
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Routing
Routing
Routing
is the process of selecting a path for traffic in a network, or between or across multiple networks. Routing
Routing
is performed for many types of networks, including circuit-switched networks, such as the public switched telephone network (PSTN), and computer networks, such as the Internet. In packet switching networks, routing is the higher-level decision making that directs network packets from their source toward their destination through intermediate network nodes by specific packet forwarding mechanisms. Packet forwarding is the transit of logically addressed network packets from one network interface to another. Intermediate nodes are typically network hardware devices such as routers, bridges, gateways, firewalls, or switches. General-purpose computers also forward packets and perform routing, although they have no specially optimized hardware for the task
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Podcast
A podcast, or generically netcast, is an episodic series of digital audio or video files which a user can download and listen to. It is often available for subscription, so that new episodes are automatically downloaded via web syndication to the user's own local computer, mobile application, or portable media player.[1] It is distinct from Internet
Internet
radio, which involves streaming rather than downloading. The word was originally suggested by Ben Hammersley
Ben Hammersley
as a portmanteau of "iPod" (a brand of media player) and "broadcast".[2] The files distributed are in audio format, but may sometimes include other file formats such as PDF or EPUB. Videos which are shared following a podcast model are called video podcasts or vodcasts. The generator of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a server as a web feed that can be accessed through the Internet
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Instant Messaging
Instant messaging
Instant messaging
(IM) technology is a type of online chat that offers real-time text transmission over the Internet. A LAN messenger operates in a similar way over a local area network. Short messages are typically transmitted between two parties, when each user chooses to complete a thought and select "send". Some IM applications can use push technology to provide real-time text, which transmits messages character by character, as they are composed. More advanced instant messaging can add file transfer, clickable hyperlinks, Voice over IP, or video chat. Non-IM types of chat include multicast transmission, usually referred to as "chat rooms", where participants might be anonymous or might be previously known to each other (for example collaborators on a project that is using chat to facilitate communication)
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Opte Project
The Opte Project, created in 2003 by Barrett Lyon,[1] seeks to generate an accurate representation of the breadth of the Internet using visual graphics.[2][3] Lyon believes that his network mapping can help teach students more about the Internet
Internet
while also acting as a gauge illustrating both overall Internet
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Online Shopping
Online shopping
Online shopping
is a form of electronic commerce which allows consumers to directly buy goods or services from a seller over the Internet
Internet
using a web browser. Consumers find a product of interest by visiting the website of the retailer directly or by searching among alternative vendors using a shopping search engine, which displays the same product's availability and pricing at different e-retailers. As of 2016, customers can shop online using a range of different computers and devices, including desktop computers, laptops, tablet computers and smartphones. An online shop evokes the physical analogy of buying products or services at a regular "bricks-and-mortar" retailer or shopping center; the process is called business-to-consumer (B2C) online shopping. When an online store is set up to enable businesses to buy from another businesses, the process is called business-to-business (B2B) online shopping
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Internet (other)
The Internet
Internet
is a global system of interconnected computer networks. Internet
Internet
may also refer to:
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Freedom Of Information
Freedom of information
Freedom of information
is an extension of freedom of speech, a fundamental human right recognized in international law, which is today understood more generally as freedom of expression in any medium, be it orally, in writing, print, through the Internet
Internet
or through art forms.[citation needed] This means that the protection of freedom of speech as a right includes not only the content, but also the means of expression.[1] Freedom of information
Freedom of information
also refers to the right to privacy in the content of the Internet
Internet
and information technology
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Web Search Engine
A 'web search engine' is a software system that is designed to search for information on the World Wide Web. The search results are generally presented in a line of results often referred to as search engine results pages (SERPs). The information may be a mix of web pages, images, and other types of files. Some search engines also mine data available in databases or open directories
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