HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Insadong
Insa-dong
Insa-dong
is a dong, or neighborhood of the Jongno-gu
Jongno-gu
district of Seoul
[...More...]

"Insadong" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
[...More...]

"Hangul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation
http://www.smrt.co.kr/main/index/index002.jsp http://5678blog.com/ Seoul
Seoul
Metropolitan Rapid Transit CorporationHangul 서울특별시 도시철도공사Hanja 서울特別市 都市鐵道公社Revised Romanization Seoul
Seoul
Teukbyeolsi Dosicheoldo GongsaMcCune–Reischauer Sŏul Tŭkpyŏlsi Tosich'ŏlto Kongsa Seoul
Seoul
Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation (SMRT) was established in 1994 to operate the Seoul
Seoul
Subway lines 5, 6, 7, 8 in Seoul, South Korea. The corporation operated a total of 201 subway trains at 148 stations on lines 5-8. The operation intervals are from 2.5–6 minutes during rush hours and 5–10 minutes during non-rush hours
[...More...]

"Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gimbap
Gimbap
Gimbap
(김밥) is a Korean dish made from cooked rice and other ingredients that are rolled in gim—dried sheets of laver seaweed—and served in bite-sized slices.[1] The dish is often part of a packed meal, or dosirak, to be eaten at picnics and outdoor events, and can serve as a light lunch along with danmuji (yellow pickled radish) and kimchi. It is a popular take-out food in Korea
Korea
and abroad,[2] and is known as a convenient food because of its portability
[...More...]

"Gimbap" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Odeng
A fishcake (sometimes written as fish cake) is a food item similar to a croquette, consisting of filleted fish or other seafood with potato patty, sometimes coated in breadcrumbs or batter, and fried. Fishcakes as defined in the Oxford Dictionary of Food and Nutrition are chopped or minced fish mixed with potato, egg and flour with seasonings of onions, peppers and sometimes herbs.[1] The fishcake has been seen as a way of using up leftovers that might otherwise be thrown away
[...More...]

"Odeng" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bungeoppang
Bungeo-ppang (붕어빵; "carp bread") is a fish-shaped pastry stuffed with sweetened red bean paste.[1] It is one of the most common winter street food in Korea.[2][3] It is often sold at street stalls, grilled in an appliance similar to a waffle iron, but with fish-shaped molds. Although red bean paste is the standard filling, many bungeo-ppang that are sold as street food are filled with pastry cream (called "choux-cream" in Korea), pizza toppings, chocolate, and so on.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Preparations 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word bungeo-ppang is a compound of "carp (bungeo)" and "bread (ppang)" the pastry, however, does not contain any ingredients from its namesake fish or any other fish, rather the name comes from the shape of the pastry. History[edit] Bungeo-ppang was derived from a similar Japanese dish, taiyaki (baked sea bream), introduced to Korea around 1930s during the Japanese forced occupation period.[4] Accordi
[...More...]

"Bungeoppang" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hanbok
Hanbok
Hanbok
(South Korea) or Joseon-ot (North Korea) is the representative example of traditional Korean dress. It is characterized by vibrant colors and simple lines without pockets. Although the term literally means "Korean clothing", hanbok usually refers specifically to clothing of the Joseon
Joseon
period and is worn as semi-formal or formal wear during traditional festivals and celebrations
[...More...]

"Hanbok" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jonggak Station
Jonggak Station is a station on the Line 1 of the Seoul
Seoul
Subway in South Korea. It is located on Jongno, central Seoul
Seoul
and comprises a large underground arcade. The second-largest book shop in South Korea, the Bandi & Luni's lying under the Jongno
Jongno
Tower, which in turn is just above this station, is directly accessible from the station. On every New Year's Day, the bell ceremony (Jeyaeui Jong Tajongsik) is held at Boshingak, the nearby bell pavilion
[...More...]

"Jonggak Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seoul Subway Line 1
Line 1 of the Seoul Metropolitan Subway is a commuter rail service which links central Seoul, South Korea
South Korea
to Soyosan Station
Soyosan Station
in the northeast, Incheon
Incheon
in the southwest, and Sinchang via Suwon
Suwon
and Cheonan
Cheonan
in the south. The central underground portion of this rail line is the oldest subway section in the Seoul
Seoul
Metropolitan Subway system; the entire rail line covers a large part of the Seoul
Seoul
Capital Area
[...More...]

"Seoul Subway Line 1" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jongno 3-ga Station
Jongno 3(sam)-ga Station is an underground station on lines 1, 3 and 5 of the Seoul Subway in South Korea. In December 2010 the station is recorded as having the fifth highest WiFi data consumption of all the Seoul Metropolitan Subway stations, following Express Bus Terminal Station, Sadang Station, Dongdaemun Station and Jamsil Station.[3]Contents1 Station layout 2 History 3 Entrances 4 Tourism 5 ReferencesStation layout[edit]G Street level ExitL1 Concourse Lobby Customer Service, Shops, Vending machines, ATMsL2 Line 1 platforms Side platform, doors will open on the leftSouthbound → Line 1 toward Incheon or Sinchang (Jonggak) →Northbound ← Line 1 toward Soyosan (Jongno 5 (o)-ga)Side platform, doors will open on the leftL3 Line 3 platform Northbound ← Line 3 toward Daehwa (Anguk)Island platform, doors will open on the leftSouthbound → Line 3 toward Ogeum (Euljiro 3 (sam)-ga) →L4 Line
[...More...]

"Jongno 3-ga Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seoul Subway Line 3
Seoul
Seoul
Subway Line 3 (dubbed The Orange Line) of the Seoul
Seoul
Metropolitan Subway is a rapid transit and commuter rail service that connects Goyang, northwestern Seoul
Seoul
to the city center, Gangnam and southeastern Seoul. In December 2010 the line is recorded as having the second highest WiFi data consumption in the Seoul
Seoul
Metropolitan area. It averaged 1.8 times more than the other 14 subway lines fitted with WiFi service zones.[3]Contents1 History 2 Tourism 3 Stations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Construction began in 1980, and most of the current line opened (Gupabal–Yangjae; Jichuk opened in 1990) after completion of work in two stages during 1985, along with brother subway Line 4
[...More...]

"Seoul Subway Line 3" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seoul Subway Line 5
Seoul
Seoul
Subway Line 5 of the Seoul
Seoul
Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation, dubbed the purple line, is a long line crossing from the west to the east across the Seoul
Seoul
National Capital Area, South Korea. It is one of two subway lines in Seoul
Seoul
to cross under the Han River (the other being Bundang Line), which is done at two points (between Mapo–Yeouinaru and Gwangnaru–Cheonho). It branches into two different lines at Gangdong Station
Gangdong Station
to terminate at Sangil-dong Station and Macheon Station. The total length of this line is 52.3 kilometres (32.5 mi). Upon opening, it was among the longest underground railway tunnels of any kind constructed
[...More...]

"Seoul Subway Line 5" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Itaewon Station
Itaewon Station is a station on Line 6 of the Seoul Subway. It takes its name from the neighborhood in which it is located in, also called Itaewon. There are many shops and restaurants for foreigners located close to Itaewon Station. Station layout[edit]G Street level ExitL1 Concourse Lobby Customer Service, Shops, Vending machines, ATMsL2 Platform level Westbound ← Line 6 toward Eungam (Noksapyeong)Island platform, doors will open on the leftEastbound → Line 6 toward Bonghwasan (Hangangjin) →Vicinity[edit]Exit 1 : Hamilton Hotel Exit 2 : Pakistani, Egyptian, Ecuadorian, Argentine Embassies in Korea Exit 3 : Bogwang Elementary School Exit 4 : Itaewon MarketTourism[edit] In January 2013, the Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation, which operates the line and the station, distributed free guidebooks from the station
[...More...]

"Itaewon Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
[...More...]

"Hanja" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seoul Subway Line 6
Seoul Subway
Seoul Subway
Line 6 is a line of the Seoul
Seoul
Subway. Its color is ochre.Contents1 Overview 2 Tourism 3 Stations 4 References 5 See alsoOverview[edit] The route connects Eunpyeong-gu
Eunpyeong-gu
and Jungnang-gu
Jungnang-gu
in a U-shaped manner, running through Yongsan-gu
Yongsan-gu
and Seongbuk-gu. It does not cross over the Han River. It is mainly used to connect to the outskirts of Seoul
Seoul
and to relieve the traffic on other lines. The line primarily operates in the section between Eungam and Bonghwasan. When a train arrives at Eungam, it runs through what is commonly known as the "Eungam Loop", a one-way operation loop of stations. After going through the stations of the Eungam Loop in an anti-clockwise direction, the train reaches Eungam again, from which it continues to Bonghwasan
[...More...]

"Seoul Subway Line 6" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gwanghwamun Station
Gwanghwamun Station is a station on the Seoul Subway Line 5 in South Korea. It is not the closest subway station to the actual gate of Gwanghwamun, for which it is named
[...More...]

"Gwanghwamun Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.