HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Innocenzo Manzetti
Innocenzo Vincenzo Bartolomeo Luigi Carlo Manzetti[1] (Italian pronunciation: [innoˈtʃɛntso manˈdzetti]; 17 March 1826 – 15 March 1877) was an Italian inventor born in Aosta. Following his primary school studies he went to the Jesuit-run Saint Bénin Boarding School and then on to Turin
Turin
where he was awarded a diploma in land surveying before returning to Aosta.Contents1 Inventions1.1 Automaton 1.2 Hydraulics 1.3 Steam car 1.4 Speaking telegraph (telephone) 1.5 Miscellaneous inventions2 Family 3 References 4 External linksInventions[edit] Automaton[edit]The flute-player (1840)In 1840 he constructed a flute-playing automaton, in the shape of a man, life-size, seated on a chair. Hidden inside the chair were levers, connecting rods and compressed air tubes, which made the automaton's lips and fingers move on the flute according to a program recorded on a cylinder similar to those used in player pianos
[...More...]

"Innocenzo Manzetti" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Italians
c. 140 million Italian citizens: c. 60 million Italian ancestry: c. 80 millionRegions with significant populations  Italy
Italy
       c
[...More...]

"Italians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aromatic
In organic chemistry, the term aromaticity is used to describe a cyclic (ring-shaped), planar (flat) molecule with a ring of resonance bonds that exhibits more stability than other geometric or connective arrangements with the same set of atoms. Aromatic molecules are very stable, and do not break apart easily to react with other substances. Organic compounds that are not aromatic are classified as aliphatic compounds—they might be cyclic, but only aromatic rings have special stability (low reactivity). Since the most common aromatic compounds are derivatives of benzene (an aromatic hydrocarbon common in petroleum and its distillates), the word “aromatic” occasionally refers informally to benzene derivatives, and so it was first defined. Nevertheless, many non-benzene aromatic compounds exist. In living organisms, for example, the most common aromatic rings are the double-ringed bases in RNA
RNA
and DNA
[...More...]

"Aromatic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
[...More...]

"Piano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pantograph
A pantograph (Greek roots παντ- "all, every" and γραφ- "to write", from their original use for copying writing) is a mechanical linkage connected in a manner based on parallelograms so that the movement of one pen, in tracing an image, produces identical movements in a second pen. If a line drawing is traced by the first point, an identical, enlarged, or miniaturized copy will be drawn by a pen fixed to the other. Using the same principle, different kinds of pantographs are used for other forms of duplication in areas such as sculpture, minting, engraving and milling. Because of the shape of the original device, a pantograph also refers to a kind of structure that can compress or extend like an accordion, forming a characteristic rhomboidal pattern
[...More...]

"Pantograph" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bas-reliefs
Relief
Relief
is a sculptural technique where the sculpted elements remain attached to a solid background of the same material. The term relief is from the Latin verb relevo, to raise. To create a sculpture in relief is to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background plane.[1] What is actually performed when a relief is cut in from a flat surface of stone (relief sculpture) or wood (relief carving) is a lowering of the field, leaving the unsculpted parts seemingly raised. The technique involves considerable chiselling away of the background, which is a time-consuming exercise. On the other hand, a relief saves forming the rear of a subject, and is less fragile and more securely fixed than a sculpture in the round, especially one of a standing figure where the ankles are a potential weak point, especially in stone
[...More...]

"Bas-reliefs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ivory
Ivory
Ivory
is a hard, white material from the tusks (traditionally elephants') and teeth of animals, that can be used in art or manufacturing. It consists mainly of dentine (inorganic formula Ca10(PO4)6(CO3)·H2O)), one of the physical structures of teeth and tusks. The chemical structure of the teeth and tusks of mammals is the same, regardless of the species of origin
[...More...]

"Ivory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marble
Marble
Marble
is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble
Marble
may be foliated. In geology the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone.[1] Marble
Marble
is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical origins 3 Types 4 Uses4.1 Sculpture 4.2 Construction
Construction
marble5 Production5.1 Occupational safety5.1.1 United States6 Microbial degradation 7 Cultural associations 8 Artificial marble 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEtymologyCarlo Franzoni's sculptural marble chariot clock depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. Marble
Marble
wall of Ruskeala
[...More...]

"Marble" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wood
Wood
Wood
is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic material, a natural composite of cellulose fibers that are strong in tension and embedded in a matrix of lignin that resists compression. Wood
Wood
is sometimes defined as only the secondary xylem in the stems of trees,[1] or it is defined more broadly to include the same type of tissue elsewhere such as in the roots of trees or shrubs.[citation needed] In a living tree it performs a support function, enabling woody plants to grow large or to stand up by themselves. It also conveys water and nutrients between the leaves, other growing tissues, and the roots
[...More...]

"Wood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Telescope
A telescope is an optical instrument that aids in the observation of remote objects by collecting electromagnetic radiation (such as visible light)[citation needed]. The first known practical telescopes were invented in the Netherlands
Netherlands
at the beginning of the 17th century, by using glass lenses. They found use in both terrestrial applications and astronomy. The reflecting telescope, which uses mirrors to collect and focus light, was invented within a few decades of the first telescopes being made. In the 20th century, many new types of telescopes were invented, including radio telescopes in the 1930s and infrared telescopes in the 1960s
[...More...]

"Telescope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pendulum
A pendulum is a weight suspended from a pivot so that it can swing freely.[1] When a pendulum is displaced sideways from its resting, equilibrium position, it is subject to a restoring force due to gravity that will accelerate it back toward the equilibrium position. When released, the restoring force acting on the pendulum's mass causes it to oscillate about the equilibrium position, swinging back and forth. The time for one complete cycle, a left swing and a right swing, is called the period
[...More...]

"Pendulum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polypeptides
Peptides (from Gr.: πεπτός, peptós "digested"; derived from πέσσειν, péssein "to digest") are short chains of amino acid monomers linked by peptide (amide) bonds. The covalent chemical bonds are formed when the carboxyl group of one amino acid reacts with the amino group of another. The shortest peptides are dipeptides, consisting of 2 amino acids joined by a single peptide bond, followed by tripeptides, tetrapeptides, etc
[...More...]

"Polypeptides" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anti-aromatic
Antiaromaticity
Antiaromaticity
is a characteristic of a cyclic molecule with a π electron system that has higher energy due to the presence of 4n electrons in it. Unlike aromatic compounds, which follow Hückel's rule ([4n+2] π electrons)[1] and are highly stable, antiaromatic compounds are highly unstable and highly reactive. To avoid the instability of antiaromaticity, molecules may change shape, becoming non-planar and therefore breaking some of the π interactions. In contrast to the diamagnetic ring current present in aromatic compounds, antiaromatic compounds have a paramagnetic ring current, which can be observed by NMR
NMR
spectroscopy.Examples of antiaromatic compounds. A: pentalene; B: biphenylene; C: cyclopentadienyl cationExamples of antiaromatic compounds are pentalene (A), biphenylene (B), cyclopentadienyl cation (C)
[...More...]

"Anti-aromatic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Inventor
An inventor is a person who creates or discovers a new method, form, device or other useful means that becomes known as an invention. The word inventor comes from the Latin
Latin
verb invenire, invent-, to find.[1][2] The system of patents was established to encourage inventors by granting limited-term, limited monopoly on inventions determined to be sufficiently novel, non-obvious, and useful. Although inventing is closely associated with science and engineering, inventors are not necessarily engineers nor scientists.[3] See also[edit]Technology portal Mind and brain portalCreativity History of science and technology Independent inventor Inventor's notebook Inventor (patent) Inventor's Day List of inventors Innovator Prolific inventors The heroic theory of invention and scientific developmentReferences[edit]^ inventor. Dictionary.com. Retrieved 1 October 2017. ^ invent. Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 1 October 2017. ^ *Inventor
[...More...]

"Inventor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
is the scientific discipline involved with compounds composed of atoms, i.e. elements, and molecules, i.e. combinations of atoms: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a reaction with other compounds.[1][2] Chemistry
Chemistry
addresses topics such as how atoms and molecules interact via chemical bonds to form new chemical compounds. There are four types of chemical bonds: covalent bonds, in which compounds share one or more electron(s); ionic bonds, in which a compound donates one or more electrons to another compound to produce ions: cations and anions; hydrogen bonds; and Van der Waals force
Van der Waals force
bonds
[...More...]

"Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nanowires
A nanowire is a nanostructure, with the diameter of the order of a nanometer (10−9 meters). It can also be defined as the ratio of the length to width being greater than 1000. Alternatively, nanowires can be defined as structures that have a thickness or diameter constrained to tens of nanometers or less and an unconstrained length. At these scales, quantum mechanical effects are important—which coined the term "quantum wires". Many different types of nanowires exist, including superconducting (e.g. YBCO[1]), metallic (e.g. Ni, Pt, Au), semiconducting (e.g. silicon nanowires (SiNWs), InP, GaN) and insulating (e.g. SiO2, TiO2). Molecular nanowires
Molecular nanowires
are composed of repeating molecular units either organic (e.g
[...More...]

"Nanowires" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.