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Innere Neustadt (Dresden)
The Innere Neustadt (Inner New City) is a neighborhood in Dresden within the administrative district of Neustadt. The name is derived from "Neuen Königlichen Stadt" (New Royal City), the name given to the former district of Altendresden when it was rebuilt after a fire before 1732. In contrast to the Äußere Neustadt
Äußere Neustadt
(Outer New City), the Innere Neustadt was within the city fortifications and, for that reason, is also known as the historic Neustadt.Contents1 Location 2 Cultural and architectural features 3 Second World War 4 Traffic and Infrastructure 5 Business and GovernmentLocation[edit] The Innere Neustadt is located in the administrative district of Neustadt, across the Elbe
Elbe
and to the north of the Innere Altstadt (Inner Old City). The River Elbe
Elbe
forms an enclosing arc around the Innere Neustadt
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Pedestrian Street
Pedestrian zones (also known as auto-free zones and car-free zones, and as pedestrian precincts in British English[1]) are areas of a city or town reserved for pedestrian-only use and in which most or all automobile traffic may be prohibited. Converting a street or an area to pedestrian-only use is called pedestrianisation. Pedestrianisation usually aims to provide better accessibility and mobility for pedestrians, to enhance the volume of shopping and other business activity in the area and/or to improve the attractiveness of the local environment in terms of aesthetics, air pollution, noise and accidents involving pedestrians.[2] However, pedestrianisation can sometimes lead to reductions in business activity, property devaluation, and displacement of economic activity to other areas
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Plattenbau
Plattenbau
Plattenbau
(plural: Plattenbauten, German: Platte: panel/ slab; Bau: building/ construction) is a building constructed of large, prefabricated concrete slabs. The word is a compound of Platte (in this context: panel) and Bau (building). Although Plattenbauten are often considered to be typical of East Germany, the prefabricated construction method was used extensively in West Germany
West Germany
and elsewhere, particularly in public housing (see tower block). In English the building method is also called large panel system-building or LPS.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Prefabrication
Prefabrication
was pioneered in the Netherlands
Netherlands
following World War I, based on construction methods developed in the United States
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Westin Hotels
Westin Hotels & Resorts is an American upscale hotel chain owned by Marriott International. As of 2017, Westin operated over 269 hotels in multiple countries across the globe.Contents1 History1.1 Western Hotels 1.2 Western International Hotels 1.3 Westin Hotels 1.4 Today2 Notable hotels 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Western Hotels[edit] In 1930, Severt W. Thurston and Frank Dupar of Seattle, Washington
Seattle, Washington
met unexpectedly during breakfast at a diner in Yakima, Washington
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Restaurants
A restaurant (/ˈrɛstərənt/ or /ˈrɛstərɒnt/; French: [ʀɛs.to.ʁɑ̃] ( listen)), or an eatery, is a business which prepares and serves food and drinks to customers in exchange for money. Meals are generally served and eaten on the premises, but many restaurants also offer take-out and food delivery services, and some offer only take-out and delivery. Restaurants vary greatly in appearance and offerings, including a wide variety of cuisines and service models ranging from inexpensive fast food restaurants and cafeterias to mid-priced family restaurants, to high-priced luxury establishments. In Western countries, most mid- to high-range restaurants serve alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine
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Hotels
A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. Facilities provided may range from a modest-quality mattress in a small room to large suites with bigger, higher-quality beds, a dresser, a refrigerator and other kitchen facilities, upholstered chairs, a flat screen television and en-suite bathrooms. Small, lower-priced hotels may offer only the most basic guest services and facilities. Larger, higher-priced hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, business centre (with computers, printers and other office equipment), childcare, conference and event facilities, tennis or basketball courts, gymnasium, restaurants, day spa and social function services. Hotel
Hotel
rooms are usually numbered (or named in some smaller hotels and B&Bs) to allow guests to identify their room. Some boutique, high-end hotels have custom decorated rooms. Some hotels offer meals as part of a room and board arrangement
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Retail
Retail
Retail
is the process of selling consumer goods or services to customers through multiple channels of distribution to earn a profit. Retailers satisfy demand identified through a supply chain. The term "retailer" is typically applied where a service provider fills the small orders of a large number of individuals, who are end-users, rather than large orders of a small number of wholesale, corporate or government clientele. Shopping
Shopping
generally refers to the act of buying products. Sometimes this is done to obtain final goods, including necessities such as food and clothing; sometimes it takes place as a recreational activity. Recreational shopping often involves window shopping and browsing: it does not always result in a purchase. Retail
Retail
markets and shops have a very ancient history, dating back to antiquity
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Gastronomy
Gastronomy
Gastronomy
is the study of the relationship between food and culture, art of preparing and serving rich or delicate and appetizing food, a style of cooking from particular region and the science of good eating.[1] One who is well versed in gastronomy is called a gastronome, while a gastronomist is one who unites theory and practice in the study of gastronomy. Practical gastronomy is associated with the practice and study of the preparation, production, and service of the various foods and beverages, from countries around the world. Theoretical gastronomy supports practical gastronomy. It is related with a system and process approach, focused on recipes, techniques and cookery books. Food
Food
gastronomy is connected with food and beverages and their genesis
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Economic Sectors
One classical breakdown of economic activity distinguishes three sectors:[1]Primary: involves the retrieval and production of raw materials, such as corn, coal, wood and iron. (A coal miner, farmer or fisherman would be workers in the primary sector.) Secondary: involves the transformation of raw or intermediate materials into goods e.g. manufacturing steel into cars, or textiles into clothing. (A builder and a dressmaker would be workers in the secondary sector.) Tertiary: involves the supplying of services to consumers and businesses, such as baby-sitting, cinema and banking. (A shopkeeper and an accountant would be workers in the tertiary sector.)In the 20th century, economists began to suggest that traditional tertiary services could be further distinguished from "quaternary" and quinary service sectors
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Dresden-Neustadt Station
Dresden-Neustadt station
Dresden-Neustadt station
(German: Bahnhof Dresden-Neustadt) is the second largest railway station in the German city of Dresden
Dresden
after Dresden
Dresden
Hauptbahnhof and is also a stop for long-distance traafic. It is the junction for rail traffic on the northern side of the Elbe. It was built in 1901, replacing the Leipziger Bahnhof ( Leipzig
Leipzig
line station), which was opened in Leipziger Vorstadt in 1839, and the Schlesischen Bahnhof (Silesian line station), which was opened in 1847
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Train Station
A train station, railway station, railroad station, or depot (see below) is a railway facility or area where trains regularly stop to load or unload passengers or freight. It generally consists of at least one track-side platform and a station building (depot) providing such ancillary services as ticket sales and waiting rooms. If a station is on a single-track line, it often has a passing loop to facilitate traffic movements. The smallest stations are most often referred to as "stops" or, in some parts of the world, as "halts" (flag stops). Stations may be at ground level, underground, or elevated
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Rail Line
Rail terminology is a form of technical terminology. The difference between the American term railroad and the international term railway (used by the International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
and English-speaking countries outside the United States) is the most significant difference in rail terminology. There are also others, due to the parallel development of rail transport systems in different parts of the world. Various global terms are presented here; where a term has multiple names, this is indicated
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Tram
A tram (also tramcar; and in North America streetcar, trolley or trolley car) is a rail vehicle which runs on tracks along public urban streets, and also sometimes on a segregated right of way.[1][2] The lines or networks operated by tramcars are called tramways. Tramways powered by electricity, the most common type, were once called electric street railways (mainly in the United States) due to their being widely used in urban areas before the universal adoption of electrification. In the United States, the term tram has sometimes been used for rubber-tyred trackless trains, which are not related to the other vehicles covered in this article. Tram
Tram
vehicles are usually lighter and shorter than conventional trains and rapid transit trains. Today, most trams use electrical power, usually fed by an overhead pantograph; in some cases by a sliding shoe on a third rail, trolley pole or bow collector
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Äußere Neustadt
Äußere Neustadt (English "Outer New Town"), also known as Antonstadt after Anthony (German: Anton), King of Saxony, is a neighborhood in Dresden, Germany. The Äußere Neustadt contains the part of the Neustadt that is located outside of where the old city walls used to be. Today the area is known for its thriving bars and clubs.Contents1 Location 2 Traffic 3 History 4 Attractions4.1 Martin Luther Church 4.2 Pfund's dairy 4.3 Old Jewish cemetery 4.4 Kunsthofpassage 4.5 Nordbad 4.6 Panama Adventure Playground5 Nightlife 6 NotesLocation[edit] The Äußere Neustadt is bounded by Bautzener Straße and Albertplatz to the south, Königsbrücker Straße to the west, the street Bischofsweg and Alaunpark to the north, and the Prießnitz river to the east. These, however, are the official borders
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Artesian Well
An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. A well drilled into such an aquifer is called an artesian well. If water reaches the ground surface under the natural pressure of the aquifer, the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1][2] An aquifer is a geologic layer of porous and permeable material such as sand and gravel, limestone, or sandstone, through which water flows and is stored. An artesian aquifer is confined between impermeable rocks or clay which causes this positive pressure. Not all the aquifers are artesian (i.e. water table aquifers occur where the groundwater level at the top of the aquifer is at equilibrium with atmospheric pressure)
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Ministry (government Department)
A ministry is a governmental organisation, headed by a minister, that is meant to manage a specific sector of public administration.[1] Ministries have a bureaucratic structure.[1] Different states have different numbers and names of ministries,[1] but the Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
notes that all states have (often under different names) a Ministry of Interior, a Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a
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