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Inka Kancha
Inka Kancha
Inka Kancha
(Quechua Inka Inca, kancha enclosure; corral,[2] "Inca enclosure" or "Inca corral", Hispanicized spelling Incacancha) is a 5,146-metre-high (16,883 ft) mountain in the Andes
Andes
of Peru. It is situated in the Lima Region, Huarochiri Province, Chicla District. Inka Kancha
Inka Kancha
lies near the Antikuna mountain pass, south of Sillaqaqa.[1][3] References[edit]^ a b "Cerro Incacancha". IGN, Peru. Retrieved March 4, 2015.  ^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary) ^ escale.minedu.gob.pe - UGEL map of the Huarochiri Province
Huarochiri Province
(Lima Region)This Lima Region
Lima Region
geography article is a stub
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Peru
Coordinates: 10°S 76°W / 10°S 76°W / -10; -76 Republic
Republic
of Peru República del Perú  (Spanish)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Firme y feliz por la unión" (Spanish) "Firm and Happy for the Union"Anthem: "Himno Nacional del Perú"  (Spanish) "National Anthem of Peru"National SealGran Sello del Estado  (Spanish) Great Seal of the StateLocation of  Peru  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Lima 12°2.6′S 77°1.7′W / 12.0433°S 77
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Lima Region
Lima
Lima
Region (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈlima]) is located in the central coast of the country, its regional seat (capital city) is Huacho
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Mountain Range
A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny.[1] Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys. Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
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Andes
The Andes
Andes
or Andean Mountains (Spanish: Cordillera de los Andes) are the longest continental mountain range in the world. They form a continuous highland along the western edge of South America. This range is about 7,000 km (4,300 mi) long, about 200 to 700 km (120 to 430 mi) wide (widest between 18° south and 20° south latitude), and of an average height of about 4,000 m (13,000 ft). The Andes
Andes
extend from north to south through seven South American countries: Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina
Argentina
and Chile. Along their length, the Andes
Andes
are split into several ranges, which are separated by intermediate depressions. The Andes
Andes
are the location of several high plateaus – some of which host major cities such as Quito, Bogotá, Arequipa, Medellín, Sucre, Mérida and La Paz
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Quechua Language
Quechua (/ˈkɛtʃuə/, in AmE also /ˈkɛtʃwɑː/)[2], known as Runasimi ("people's language") in the Quechuan language, is an indigenous language family, with variations spoken by the Quechua peoples, primarily living in the Andes
Andes
and highlands of South America.[3] Derived from a common ancestral language, it is the most widely spoken language family of indigenous peoples of the Americas, with a total of probably some 8–10 million speakers.[4] Approximately 25% (7.7 million) of Peruvians speak some variation of Quechua.[5][6] It is perhaps most widely known for being the main language of the Inca Empire. The colonisers initially encouraged its use, but from the middle of their reign they suppressed it
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Inca Empire
The Inca Empire
Empire
(Quechua: Tawantinsuyu, lit. "The Four Regions"[2]), also known as the Incan Empire
Empire
and the Inka Empire, was the largest empire in pre-Columbian America,[3] and possibly the largest empire in the world in the early 16th century.[4] Its political and administrative structure "was the most sophisticated found among native peoples" in the Americas.[5] The administrative, political and military center of the empire was located in Cusco
Cusco
in modern-day Peru. The Inca civilization
Inca civilization
arose from the highlands of Peru
Peru
sometime in the early 13th century. Its last stronghold was conquered by the Spanish in 1572. From 1438 to 1533, the Incas incorporated a large portion of western South America, centered on the Andean Mountains, using conquest and peaceful assimilation, among other methods
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Ticlio
Ticlio
Ticlio
(or Anticona) is a mountain pass and the highest point of the central road of Peru
Peru
(km 120), in the Andes
Andes
mountains, reaching a height of 4,818 metres (15,807 ft). It used to be a railway crossing loop on the Ferrocarril Central Andino
Ferrocarril Central Andino
(FCCA) in Peru
Peru
whose main claim to fame was being the highest railway junction in the world. The railway now crosses the pass through a nearby tunnel at a lower elevation (4783 m) which enters a different valley than the highway on the eastern side of the pass.Contents1 Overview 2 See also 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] It lies at km 171 just on the Pacific side of the Andes
Andes
watershed
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Geography
Geography
Geography
(from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description"[1]) is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.[2] The first person to use the word "γεωγραφία" was Eratosthenes (276–194 BC).[3] Geography
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Huarochiri Province
Huarochirí Province
Huarochirí Province
(in hispanicized spelling) or Waruchiri[1] is located in the Lima Region
Lima Region
of Peru. Its capital is Matucana. The western section is part of the Lima Metropolitan Area.Contents1 Geography 2 Political division 3 See also 4 ReferencesGeography[edit] The La Viuda and Paryaqaqa
Paryaqaqa
or Waruchiri mountain ranges and the Cordillera de la Corte traverse the province. One of the highest peaks of the province is Paryaqaqa
Paryaqaqa
at 5,750 metres (18,865 ft) above sea level
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Chicla District
Chicla District
Chicla District
is one of thirty-two districts of the province Huarochirí in Peru.[1] Geography[edit] Some of the highest mountains of the district are listed below:[2]Anta Q'asa Antikuna Chinchirusa Chuqi Chukchu Inka Kancha Jirish Mach'ay Lichiqucha Llawa P'ukru Millpu Paraqti Pukaqucha Putka Qanchis Kancha Qunchupata Quñuq P'ukru Quri Kancha Shira Sillaqaqa Tawllin Tikti Mach'ay Ukrupata Wachwa Wayrakancha YuraqquchaSee also[edit]Tiktiqucha YuraqmayuReferences[edit]^ (in Spanish) Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática. Banco de Información Distrital Archived April 23, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
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Sillaqaqa
Sillaqaqa
Sillaqaqa
(Quechua silla gravel, qaqa rock,[2] "gravel rock", Hispanicized spelling Sillagaga) is a mountain in the Andes
Andes
of Peru, about 5,000 metres (16,404 ft) high. It is situated in the Junín Region, Yauli Province, Marcapomacocha District, and in the Lima Region, Huarochirí Province, Chicla District. Sillaqaqa
Sillaqaqa
lies southwest of the mountain Pukaqucha, west of the mountain Yuraqqucha, northeast of Llawa P'ukru
Llawa P'ukru
and east of the mountains Quriqucha and Anta Q'asa
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Inka Kancha
Inka Kancha
Inka Kancha
(Quechua Inka Inca, kancha enclosure; corral,[2] "Inca enclosure" or "Inca corral", Hispanicized spelling Incacancha) is a 5,146-metre-high (16,883 ft) mountain in the Andes
Andes
of Peru. It is situated in the Lima Region, Huarochiri Province, Chicla District. Inka Kancha
Inka Kancha
lies near the Antikuna mountain pass, south of Sillaqaqa.[1][3] References[edit]^ a b "Cerro Incacancha". IGN, Peru. Retrieved March 4, 2015.  ^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary) ^ escale.minedu.gob.pe - UGEL map of the Huarochiri Province
Huarochiri Province
(Lima Region)This Lima Region
Lima Region
geography article is a stub
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