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Initial
In a written or published work, an initial or drop cap is a letter at the beginning of a word, a chapter, or a paragraph that is larger than the rest of the text. The word is derived from the Latin
Latin
initialis, which means standing at the beginning. An initial is often several lines in height and in older books or manuscripts, sometimes ornately decorated. In illuminated manuscripts, initials with images inside them, such as those illustrated here, are known as historiated initials. They were an invention of the Insular art
Insular art
of the British Isles in the eighth century. Initials containing, typically, plant-form spirals with small figures of animals or humans that do not represent a specific person or scene are known as "inhabited" initials. Certain important initials, such as the Beatus initial or "B" of Beatus vir..
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Woodcut
Woodcut
Woodcut
is a relief printing technique in printmaking. An artist carves an image into the surface of a block of wood—typically with gouges—leaving the printing parts level with the surface while removing the non-printing parts. Areas that the artist cuts away carry no ink, while characters or images at surface level carry the ink to produce the print. The block is cut along the wood grain (unlike wood engraving, where the block is cut in the end-grain). The surface is covered with ink by rolling over the surface with an ink-covered roller (brayer), leaving ink upon the flat surface but not in the non-printing areas. Multiple colors can be printed by keying the paper to a frame around the woodblocks (using a different block for each color)
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Monogram
A monogram is a motif made by overlapping or combining two or more letters or other graphemes to form one symbol. Monograms are often made by combining the initials of an individual or a company, used as recognizable symbols or logos. A series of uncombined initials is properly referred to as a cypher (e.g. a royal cypher) and is not a monogram.[1]Contents1 History 2 Christograms 3 Royal monograms 4 Individual monograms 5 Other monograms 6 Resistance symbols in wartime 7 Japanese 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 ReferencesHistory[edit]The "AD" monogram that Albrecht Dürer
Albrecht Dürer
used as a signatureMonograms first appeared on coins, as early as 350BC. The earliest known examples are of the names of Greek cities who issued the coins, often the first two letters of the city's name
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Shakespeare's Sonnets
Shakespeare's sonnets
Shakespeare's sonnets
is the title of a collection of 154 sonnets by William Shakespeare, which covers themes such as the passage of time, love, beauty and mortality. The first 126 sonnets are addressed to a young man; the last 28 to a woman. The sonnets were first published in a 1609 quarto with the full stylised title: SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS. Never before Imprinted. (although sonnets 138 and 144 had previously been published in the 1599 miscellany The Passionate Pilgrim). The quarto ends with "A Lover's Complaint", a narrative poem of 47 seven-line stanzas written in rhyme royal
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Alexander Agricola
Alexander Agricola
Alexander Agricola
(/əˈɡrɪkələ/; born Alexander Ackerman;[1] 1445 or 1446 – 15 August 1506) was a Netherlandish composer of the Renaissance writing in the Franco-Flemish style. A prominent member of the Grande chapelle, the Habsburg musical establishment, he was a renowned composer in the years around 1500, and his music was widely distributed throughout Europe. He composed music in all of the important sacred and secular styles of the time.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Musical style2.1 Related schools and composers 2.2 Genres 2.3 Compositional hallmarks3 Other Agricolas 4 References 5 Notes 6 External linksLife[edit] Very little is known of Agricola's early life
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Chapter (books)
A chapter is one of the main divisions of a piece of writing of relative length, such as a book of prose, poetry, or law. A chapter book may have multiple chapters and can be referred to many things that may be the main topic of that specific chapter. In each case, chapters can be numbered or titled or both. An example of a chapter that has become well known is "Down the Rabbit-Hole", which is the first chapter from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.Contents1 Chapter structure 2 Unusual numbering schemes 3 Book-like 4 See alsoChapter structure[edit] Many novels of great length have chapters. Non-fiction books, especially those used for reference, almost always have chapters for ease of navigation. In these works, chapters are often subdivided into sections. Larger works with a lot of chapters often group them in several 'parts' as the main subdivision of the book. The chapters of reference works are almost always listed in a table of contents
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Johannes Gutenberg
Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (/joʊˈhɑːnɪs ˈɡuːtənˌbɜːrɡ, -ˈhænɪs-/ yoh-HA(H)N-iss GOO-tən-burg;[1] c. 1400[2] – February 3, 1468) was a German blacksmith, goldsmith, printer, and publisher who introduced printing to Europe with the printing press. His introduction of mechanical movable type printing to Europe started the Printing
Printing
Revolution and is regarded as a milestone of the second millennium, ushering in the modern period of human history.[3] It played a key role in the development of the Renaissance, Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment, and the scientific revolution and laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses.[4] Gutenberg in 1439 was the first European to use movable type
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Cathach Of St. Columba
The Cathach of St. Columba
Columba
(Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, s. n.) is a late 6th century Insular psalter. An Cathach (meaning "the Battler") was a very important relic used by the Clan Ó Domhnaill (O’Donnell Clan), the old Gaelic royal family in Tír Chonaill, as a rallying cry and protector in battle. It is the oldest surviving manuscript in Ireland, and the second oldest Latin psalter in the world.[1]Contents1 The manuscript 2 History 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksThe manuscript[edit] The Cathach of St. Columba
Columba
is traditionally associated with St. Columba
Columba
(d. AD 597), and was identified as the copy made by him of a book loaned to him by St. Finnian, and which led to the Battle of Cúl Dreimhne in 561 in Cairbre Drom Cliabh
Cairbre Drom Cliabh
(now in Co
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Codex Alexandrinus
The Codex
Codex
Alexandrinus (London, British Library, MS Royal 1. D. V-VIII; Gregory-Aland no. A or 02, Soden δ 4) is a fifth-century manuscript of the Greek Bible,[n 1] containing the majority of the Septuagint
Septuagint
and the New Testament.[1] It is one of the four Great uncial codices
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Papyrus 46
Papyrus
Papyrus
46 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), scribal abbreviation P displaystyle mathfrak P 46, is one of the oldest extant New Testament
New Testament
manuscripts in Greek, written on papyrus, with its 'most probable date' between 175 and 225.[1] Some leaves are part of the Chester Beatty Biblical Papyri ('CB' in the table below), and others are in the University of Michigan Papyrus
Papyrus
Collection ('Mich.' in the table below).[2]Contents1 Contents1.1 Dimensions 1.2 Missing contents 1.3 Interpunction 1.4 Nomina Sacra2 Text 3 Provenance 4 Date 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksContents[edit] P displaystyle mathfrak P 46 contains most of the Pauline epistles, though with some folios missing
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Gospel Of John
The Gospel
Gospel
According to John (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Ἰωάννην εὐαγγέλιον, translit. Tò katà Iōánnēn euangélion; also called the Gospel
Gospel
of John, the Fourth Gospel, or simply John) is one of the four canonical gospels in the New Testament. It traditionally appears fourth, after the Synoptic Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Although the Gospel
Gospel
of John is anonymous,[1] Christian tradition historically has attributed it to John the Apostle, son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and one of Jesus' Twelve Apostles. The gospel is so closely related in style and content to the three surviving Johannine epistles
Johannine epistles
that commentators treat the four books,[2] along with the Book
Book
of Revelation, as a single corpus of Johannine literature, albeit not necessarily written by the same author.[Notes 1] C. K
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Metalcut
Metalcut
Metalcut
was a relief printmaking technique, belonging to the category of old master prints. It was almost entirely restricted to the period from about 1450 to 1540, and mostly to the region around the Rhine
Rhine
in Northern Europe, the Low Countries, Germany, France
France
and Switzerland; the technique perhaps originated in the area around Cologne.Contents1 Technique 2 Practitioners 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksTechnique[edit]German "dotted manner" print, partly with added colours, 15th centuryThere were two different techniques for making metalcut prints, with very different results. The first technique is essentially that of woodcut but using a thin metal plate rather than a wooden block. The areas not to print are cut away, or hammered back with punches
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