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Inglewhite
Inglewhite
Inglewhite
is a small village in the parish of Goosnargh
Goosnargh
in Lancashire, England. It lies at the intersection of the roads from Longridge
Longridge
to Garstang
Garstang
and from Broughton to Beacon Fell.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Community 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The origin of the name Inglewhite
Inglewhite
is uncertain. One popular interpretation is that the name means 'white fire', from the Gaelic aingeal meaning 'fire'
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Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
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Fair
A fair (archaic: faire or fayre) is a gathering of people for a variety of entertainment or commercial activities. It is normally of the essence of a fair that it is temporary with scheduled times lasting from an afternoon to several weeks.Contents1 Types of fairs 2 History 3 Legacy3.1 Legal implications 3.2 In art and language4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingTypes of fairs[edit]Roundabouts (also known as a carousel or merry-go-round) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairsVariations of fairs include:Street fair, a fair that celebrates the character of a neighborhood and merchant oriented, (as the word 'fair' is historically defined; that being a marketplace). As its name suggests, it is usually held on the main street of a neighborhood. Fête, an elaborate festival, party, or celebration. Festival, an event ordinarily coordinated and/or celebrated by a community or group with a theme e.g
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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List Of Places In Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Civil Parish
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Garstang
Garstang
Garstang
is an old market town and civil parish within the Wyre borough of Lancashire, England. It is 10 miles (16 km) north of the city of Preston and the same distance south of Lancaster. In 2011, the parish had a total resident population of 4,268;[1] the larger Garstang
Garstang
Built-up Area, which includes the adjoining settlements of Bonds and Cabus, had population of 6,779.[2] Garstang is famous for being the world's first ever Fairtrade Town.Contents1 History 2 Etymology 3 21st century 4 Governance 5 Geography 6 People 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Greenhalgh CastleA brief but comprehensive history of the parish, including the parish church of St Helen in Churchtown and Greenhalgh Castle, can be found in "The Parish of Garstang", A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 7.[3] St
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Goidelic Languages
The Goidelic /ɡɔɪˈdɛlɪk/ or Gaelic languages (Irish: teangacha Gaelacha; Scottish Gaelic: cànanan Goidhealach; Manx: çhengaghyn Gaelgagh) form one of the two groups of Insular Celtic languages, the other being the Brittonic languages.[2] Goidelic languages
Goidelic languages
historically formed a dialect continuum stretching from Ireland
Ireland
through the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
to Scotland
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Will-o'-the-wisp
A will-o'-the-wisp (/ˌwɪl ə ðə ˈwɪsp/), will-o'-wisp (/ˌwɪl ə ˈwɪsp/) or ignis fatuus (/ˌɪɡnɪs ˈfætʃuəs/; Medieval Latin for "foolish fire") is an atmospheric ghost light seen by travellers at night, especially over bogs, swamps or marshes. It resembles a flickering lamp and is said to recede if approached, drawing travellers from the safe paths
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Village Green
A village green is a common open area within a village or other settlement. Traditionally, a village green was common grassland at the centre of a rural settlement used for grazing with a pond for watering cattle and other stock. The village green also provided, and may still provide, an open-air meeting place for the local people, which may be used for public celebrations such as May Day
May Day
festivities. The term is used more broadly to encompass woodland, moorland, sports grounds, buildings and roads.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Village
Village
green Melmerby, CumbriaThe village green in Stanford in the Vale, OxfordshireA large green in the village of Pritzhagen, GermanySome historical village greens have been lost as a result of the agricultural revolution and urban development
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Bull Baiting
Bull-baiting
Bull-baiting
is a blood sport involving pitting a bull against another animal, usually a dog.[1]Contents1 History1.1 England 1.2 Ireland 1.3 North America 1.4 Dogs in bull baiting2 Literature 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] England[edit]Bull and Bear
Bear
Baiting arenas shown on the "woodcut" map of London
London
of c.1561 (the dogs are shown coming out of pens to each side)In England during the time of Queen Anne, bull-baiting was practised in London
London
at Hockley-in-the-Hole, twice a week – and was also reasonably common in provincial towns. At Tutbury, a bull was tied to an iron stake so that it could move within a radius of about 30 feet. The object of the sport was for the dogs to immobilise the bull. Before the event started, the bull's nose was blown full of pepper to enrage the animal before the baiting
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Lord Of The Manor
In British or Irish history, the lordship of a manor is a lordship emanating from the feudal system of manorialism. In modern England and Wales, it is recognised as a form of property,[1] one of three elements of a manor that may exist separately or be combined, and may be held in moieties:the title (deriving from the Roman concept of dignitas); the manorial, comprising the manor and/or its land; and the seignory, rights granted to the titular holder of the manor.A title similar to such a lordship is known in French as Seigneur du Manoir, Welsh as Breyr, Gutsherr in German, Godsherre in Norwegian and Swedish, Ambachtsheer in Dutch and Signore or Vassallo in Italian
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Silk
Silk
Silk
is a natural protein fiber, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. The protein fiber of silk is composed mainly of fibroin and is produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons.[1] The best-known silk is obtained from the cocoons of the larvae of the mulberry silkworm Bombyx mori
Bombyx mori
reared in captivity (sericulture). The shimmering appearance of silk is due to the triangular prism-like structure of the silk fibre, which allows silk cloth to refract incoming light at different angles, thus producing different colors. Silk
Silk
is produced by several insects, like silk worms but generally only the silk of moth caterpillars has been used for textile manufacturing
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