HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Individual Development Account
An Individual Development Account (IDA) is an asset building tool designed to enable low-income families to save towards a targeted amount usually used for building assets in the form of home ownership, post-secondary education and small business ownership.[1] In principle IDAs work as matched savings accounts that supplement the savings of low-income households with matching funds drawn from a variety of private and public sources.[2] While anti-poverty policy makers have traditionally focused on issues of income and consumption, an expanded vision of poverty alleviation has emerged in recent years—one that encourages savings, investment, and asset accumulation in conjunction with, not instead of, traditional anti-poverty programs.[3] Assets play a vital role in poverty alleviation by providing not only economic security but also a psychological orientation that encourages low income families to save and plan for the future
[...More...]

"Individual Development Account" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
[...More...]

"Asset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Loans
In finance, a loan is the lending of money from one individual, organization or entity to another individual, organization or entity. A loan is a debt provided by an organization or individual to another entity at an interest rate, and evidenced by a promissory note which specifies, among other things, the principal amount of money borrowed, the interest rate the lender is charging, and date of repayment. A loan entails the reallocation of the subject asset(s) for a period of time, between the lender and the borrower. In a loan, the borrower initially receives or borrows an amount of money, called the principal, from the lender, and is obligated to pay back or repay an equal amount of money to the lender at a later time. The loan is generally provided at a cost, referred to as interest on the debt, which provides an incentive for the lender to engage in the loan
[...More...]

"Loans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Household Income
Household income is a measure of the combined incomes of all people sharing a particular household or place of residence. It includes every form of income, e.g., salaries and wages, retirement income, near cash government transfers like food stamps, and investment gains. Average household income can be used as an indicator for the monetary well-being of a country's citizens
[...More...]

"Household Income" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Poverty Level
The poverty threshold, poverty limit or poverty line is the minimum level of income deemed adequate in a particular country.[1] In practice, like the definition of poverty, the official or common understanding of the poverty line is significantly higher in developed countries than in developing countries.[2][3] In 2008, the World Bank came out with a figure (revised largely due to inflation) of $1.25 a day at 2005 purchasing-power parity (PPP).[4] In October 2015, the World Bank
World Bank
updated the international poverty line to $1.90 a day. The new figure of $1.90 is based on ICP purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations and represents the international equivalent of what $1.90 could buy in the US in 2011. The new IPL replaces the $1.25 per day figure, which used 2005 data
[...More...]

"Poverty Level" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Paycheck
A pay cheque, also spelled pay check, is traditionally a paper document (a cheque) issued by an employer to pay an employee for services rendered. In recent times, the physical paycheck has been increasingly replaced by electronic direct deposits to the employee's designated bank account or loaded onto a payroll card
[...More...]

"Paycheck" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Welfare
Welfare
Welfare
is the provision of a minimal level of well-being and social support for citizens and other eligible residents without sufficient current means to support basic needs. In most developed countries, welfare is mainly provided by the government from tax revenue, and to a lesser extent by NGOs, charities, informal social groups, religious groups, and inter-governmental organizations. Social security
Social security
expands on this concept, especially in welfare states, by providing all inhabitants with various social services such as universal healthcare, unemployment insurance, student financial aid (in addition to free post-secondary education), and others. In its 1952 Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention (nr
[...More...]

"Welfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Disability
Disability
Disability
is an impairment that may be cognitive, developmental, intellectual, mental, physical, sensory, or some combination of these. It substantially affects a person's life activities and may be present from birth or occur during a person's lifetime. [1]Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. An impairment is a problem in body function or structure; an activity limitation is a difficulty encountered by an individual in executing a task or action; while a participation restriction is a problem experienced by an individual in involvement in life situations. Disability
Disability
is thus not just a health problem
[...More...]

"Disability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Social Security
Social security
Social security
is "any government system that provides monetary assistance to people with an inadequate or no income."[1] Social security
Social security
is enshrined in Article 22 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:Everyone, as a
[...More...]

"Social Security" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Unemployment
Unemployment
Unemployment
is the situation of actively looking for employment but not being currently employed. The unemployment rate is a measure of the prevalence of unemployment and it is calculated as a percentage by dividing the number of unemployed individuals by all individuals currently in the labor force. During periods of recession, an economy usually experiences a relatively high unemployment rate.[1] According to International Labour Organization report, more than 200 million people globally or 6% of the world's workforce were without a job in 2012.[2] The causes of unemployment are heavily debated.[3] Classical economics, new classical economics, and the Austrian School
Austrian School
of economics argued that market mechanisms are reliable means of resolving unemployment
[...More...]

"Unemployment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Net Worth
Net worth is the value of all the non-financial and financial assets owned by an institutional unit or sector minus the value of all its outstanding liabilities.[1] Net worth can apply to companies, individuals, governments or economic sectors such as the sector of financial corporations or to entire countries.Contents1 Companies 2 Individuals 3 Governments 4 Countries 5 References 6 External linksCompanies[edit] Net worth in business is also referred to as (own) equity. It is generally based on the value of all assets and liabilities at the carrying value which is the value as expressed on the financial statements. To the extent items on the balance sheet do not express their true (market) value, the net worth will also be inaccurate
[...More...]

"Net Worth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Credit Score
A credit score is a numerical expression based on a level analysis of a person's credit files, to represent the creditworthiness of an individual. A credit score is primarily based on a credit report information typically sourced from credit bureaus. Lenders, such as banks and credit card companies, use credit scores to evaluate the potential risk posed by lending money to consumers and to mitigate losses due to bad debt. Lenders use credit scores to determine who qualifies for a loan, at what interest rate, and what credit limits. Lenders also use credit scores to determine which customers are likely to bring in the most revenue. The use of credit or identity scoring prior to authorizing access or granting credit is an implementation of a trusted system. Credit scoring is not limited to banks. Other organizations, such as mobile phone companies, insurance companies, landlords, and government departments employ the same techniques
[...More...]

"Credit Score" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Credit Cards
A credit card is a payment card issued to users (cardholders) to enable the cardholder to pay a merchant for goods and services based on the cardholder's promise to the card issuer to pay them for the amounts so paid plus the other agreed charges.[1] The card issuer (usually a bank) creates a revolving account and grants a line of credit to the cardholder, from which the cardholder can borrow money for payment to a merchant or as a cash advance. In other words, credit cards combine payment services with extensions of credit.[2] Complex fee structures in the credit card industry may limit customers' ability to comparison shop, help ensure that the industry is not price-competitive and help maximize industry profits
[...More...]

"Credit Cards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Debt
Debt
Debt
is money owed by one party, the borrower or debtor, to a second party, the lender or creditor. The borrower may be a sovereign state or country, local government, company, or an individual. The lender may be a bank, credit card company, payday loan provider, business, or an individual. Debt
Debt
is generally subject to contractual terms regarding the amount and timing of repayments of principal and interest.[1] A simple way to understand interest is to see it as the "rent" a person owes on money that they have borrowed, to the bank from which they borrowed the money. Loans, bonds, notes, and mortgages are all types of debt
[...More...]

"Debt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Money Management
Money management is the process of managing money which includes expense tracking, investment, budgeting, banking and taxes. It is also called investment management. Money management is a strategic technique employed to make money yield the highest interest-yielding value for any amount spent. Spending money to satisfy cravings (regardless of whether they can justifiably be included in a budget) is a natural human phenomenon. The idea of money management techniques has been developed to reduce the amount that individuals, firms and institutions spend on items which add no significant value to their living standards, long-term portfolios and assets. Warren Buffett, in one of his documentaries, admonished prospective investors to embrace his highly esteemed "frugality" ideology. This involves making every financial transaction worth the expense: 1. avoid any expense that appeals to vanity or snobbery 2
[...More...]

"Money Management" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Credit History
A credit history is a record of a borrower's responsible repayment of debts.[1] A credit report is a record of the borrower's credit history from a number of sources, including banks, credit card companies, collection agencies, and governments.[2] A borrower's credit score is the result of a mathematical algorithm applied to a credit report and other sources of information to predict future delinquency.[2] In many countries, when a customer fills out an application for credit from a bank, credit card company, or a store, their information is forwarded to a credit bureau. The credit bureau matches the name, address and other identifying information on the credit applicant with information retained by the bureau in its files. The gathered records are then used by lenders to determine an individual's credit worthiness; that is, determining an individual's ability and track record of repaying a debt
[...More...]

"Credit History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.