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Indigenous Peoples In Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eIndigenous peoples in Canada,[2] also known as Native Canadians
Canadians
or Aboriginal Canadians, are the indigenous peoples within the boundaries of present-day Canada. They comprise the First Nations,[3] Inuit[4] and Métis.[5] Although "Indian" is a term still commonly used in legal documents, the descriptors "Indian" and "Eskimo" have somewhat fallen into disuse in Canada
Canada
and some consider them to be pejorative.[6][7][8] Similarly, "Aboriginal" as a collective noun is a specific term of art used in some legal documents, including the Constitution Act, 1982, though in some circles that word is also falling into disfavour.[9] Old Crow Flats and Bluefish Caves
Bluefish Caves
are some of the earliest known sites of human habitation in Canada
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Americanist Phonetic Notation
Americanist phonetic notation, also known as the North American Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
or NAPA, is a system of phonetic notation originally developed by European and American anthropologists and language scientists (students of Neogrammarians) for the phonetic and phonemic transcription of indigenous languages of the Americas and for languages of Europe. It is still commonly used by linguists working on, among others, Slavic, Uralic, Semitic languages
Semitic languages
and for the languages of the Caucasus and of India (however, Uralists commonly use a variant known as the Uralic Phonetic Alphabet). The term "Americanist phonetic alphabet" is misleading because it has always been widely used outside the Americas
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Canadian French
 Canada New Brunswick  Northwest Territories  Nunavut  Quebec  YukonRecognised minority language in Canada Manitoba  Nova Scotia  Ontario  Prince Edward Island United States Maine  New Hampshire  New York  VermontLanguage codesISO 639-3 –Glottolog NoneIETF fr-CA Canadian French (French: français canadien) refers to a variety of dialects of the French language
French language
generally spoken in Canada. In 2011, the total number of native French speakers in Canada
Canada
was around 7.3 million (22% of the entire population), while another 2 million spoke it as a second language. At federal level, it has official status alongside English
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Roman Catholic Church In Canada
The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Canada
Canada
is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope. As of 2011[update], it has the largest number of adherents to a Christian denomination and a religion in Canada, with 38.7% of Canadians (12.73 million) baptized as Catholics
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Anglican Church Of Canada
The Anglican
Anglican
Church of Canada (ACC or ACoC) is the Province of the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
in C
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Native American Religion
Native American religions are the spiritual practices of the indigenous peoples of the Americas. This article focuses on Native North Americans. Traditional Native American ceremonial ways can vary widely and are based on the differing histories and beliefs of individual tribes, clans, and bands. Early European explorers describe individual Native American tribes and even small bands as each having their own religious practices
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Canadian English
Canadian English
Canadian English
(CanE, CE, en-CA[3]) is the set of varieties of the English language
English language
native to Canada
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Pacific Northwest Coast
The indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
Coast are composed of many nations and tribal affiliations, each with distinctive cultural and political identities, but they share certain beliefs, traditions and practices, such as the centrality of salmon as a resource and spiritual symbol. The term Northwest Coast or North West Coast is used in anthropology to refer to the groups of Indigenous people residing along the coast of British Columbia, Washington state, parts of Alaska, Oregon, and northern California. The term Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
is largely used in the American context. At one point the region had the highest population density of a region inhabited by Aboriginal peoples in Canada.[1][2][3]Chief Anotklosh of the Taku Tribe of the Tlingit
Tlingit
people, ca
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Greenlandic Inuit
The Greenlandic Inuit
Inuit
(Greenlandic: kalaallit) are the most populous ethnic group in Greenland. Most speak Greenlandic and consider themselves ethnically Greenlandic. They are citizens of Denmark. Approximately 89% of Greenland's population of 57,695 is Greenlandic Inuit, or 51,349 people as of 2012[update].[7] Ethnographically, they consist of three major groups:the Kalaallit
Kalaallit
of west Greenland, who speak Kalaallisut the Tunumiit
Tunumiit
of Tunu
Tunu
(east Greenland), who speak Tunumiit
Tunumiit
oraasiat ("East Greenlandic") the Inughuit
Inughuit
of north Greenland, who speak Inuktun
Inuktun
("Polar Eskimo")Historically, Kalaallit
Kalaallit
referred specifically to the people of Western Greenland
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Numbered Treaties
Key representatives of the British Crown: Adams George Archibald, Alexander Morris, David Laird, Duncan Campbell Scott, Wemyss Mackenzie Simpson, S.J Dawson, William J. Christie, James McKay, James MacLeod, James Hamilton Ross, J.A.J. McKenna, Samuel Stewart, Daniel G. MacMartin, Henry Anthony Conroy, Key representatives of First Nations groups: Crowfoot (Blackfoot Nation), Big Bear (Cree Nation), Chief Powassin (Ojibwe Nation), Chief Keenooshayoo (Athabasca First Nations)Languages EnglishThe Numbered Treaties (or Post-Confederation Treaties) are a series of eleven treaties signed between the Aboriginal peoples in Canada (or First Nations) and the reigning monarch of Canada (Victoria, Edward VII or George V) from 1871 to 1921.[1] These agreements were created to allow the Canadian government to pursue settlement and resource extraction in the affected regions, which include modern day Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories
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Mythologies Of The Indigenous Peoples Of North America
The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g
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Idle No More
methods includeCivil disobedience Demonstrations Hunger strikes Internet activism Nonviolent resistance Picketing Transportation blocks Idle No More
Idle No More
is an ongoing protest movement, founded in December 2012 by four women: three First Nations
First Nations
women and one non-Native ally. It is a grassroots movement among the Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprising the First Nations, Métis and Inuit
Inuit
peoples and their non-Aboriginal supporters in Canada, and to a lesser extent, internationally. It has consisted of a number of political actions worldwide, inspired in part by the liquid diet hunger strike of Attawapiskat
Attawapiskat
Chief Theresa Spence[1] and further coordinated via social media
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Eskimo
Eskimo
Eskimo
is an English term for the indigenous peoples who have traditionally inhabited the northern circumpolar region stretching from eastern Siberia
Siberia
(Russia), across Alaska
Alaska
(of the United States) and Canada, to Greenland.[1] The two main peoples known as "Eskimo" are: (1) the Alaskan Iñupiat
Iñupiat
peoples, Eskimo
Eskimo
Inuit, and the mass-grouping Inuit
Inuit
peoples of Canada, and (2) the Yupik
Yupik
of eastern Siberia
Siberia
and Alaska
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Mythologies Of The Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g
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