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Indian Numbering System
The Indian numbering system is used in the Indian subcontinent (Bangladesh, Burma, India, Nepal, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka). The terms lakh or lac (100,000 or 1,00,000 in the Indian system) and crore (10,000,000 or 1,00,00,000 in the Indian system) are used in Indian English to express large numbers. For example, in India 150,000 rupees becomes 1.5 lakh rupees, written as 1,50,000 or INR 1,50,000, while 30,000,000 (thirty million) rupees becomes 3 crore rupees, written as 3,00,00,000 with commas at the thousand, lakh, and crore levels, and 1,000,000,000 (one billion) rupees (one hundred crore rupees or one arab अरब ) is written 100,00,00,000. While there are specific terms for numbers larger than 1 crore, these are not commonly used, and most practitioners are not familiar with these. In common parlance, the thousand, lakh, crore terminology repeats for larger numbers
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Egyptian Numerals
The system of ancient Egyptian numerals was used in Ancient Egypt from around 3000 BC until the early first millennium AD. It was a system of numeration based on multiples of ten, often rounded off to the higher power, written in hieroglyphs
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Cyrillic Numerals
Cyrillic numerals are a numeral system derived from the Cyrillic script, developed in the First Bulgarian Empire in the late 10th century
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Georgian Numerals
The Georgian numerals are the system of number names used in Georgian, a language spoken in the country of Georgia. The Georgian numerals from 30 to 99 are constructed using a base-20 system, similar to the scheme used in Basque, French for numbers 80 through 99, or the notion of the score in English. The symbols for numbers in modern Georgian texts are the same Arabic numerals used in English, except that the comma is used as the decimal separator, and digits in large numbers are divided into groups of three using spaces or periods (full stops)
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Greek Numerals
Greek numerals, also known as Ionic, Ionian, Milesian, or Alexandrian numerals, are a system of writing numbers using the letters of the Greek alphabet. In modern Greece, they are still used for ordinal numbers and in contexts similar to those in which Roman numerals are still used elsewhere in the West
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Hebrew Numerals
The system of Hebrew numerals is a quasi-decimal alphabetic numeral system using the letters of the Hebrew alphabet. The system was adapted from that of the Greek numerals in the late 2nd century BC. The current numeral system is also known as the Hebrew alphabetic numerals to contrast with earlier systems of writing numerals used in classical antiquity. These systems were inherited from usage in the Aramaic and Phoenician scripts, attested from c. 800 BC in the so-called Samaria ostraca and sometimes known as Hebrew-Aramaic numerals, ultimately derived from the Egyptian Hieratic numerals. The Greek system was adopted in Hellenistic Judaism and had been in use in Greece since about the 5th century BC. In this system, there is no notation for zero, and the numeric values for individual letters are added together
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Roman Numerals
The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, are based on seven symbols:
Symbol I V X L C D M
Value 1 5 10 50 100 500 1,000
The use of Roman numerals continued long after the decline of the Roman Empire
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Aegean Numerals
Aegean numbers was the numeral system used by the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. They are attested in Linear A and Linear B scripts
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Babylonian Numerals
Babylonian numerals were written in cuneiform, using a wedge-tipped reed stylus to make a mark on a soft clay tablet which would be exposed in the sun to harden to create a permanent record. The Babylonians, who were famous for their astronomical observations and calculations (aided by their invention of the abacus), used a sexagesimal (base-60) positional
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Etruscan Numerals
The Etruscan numerals were used by the ancient Etruscans. The system was adapted from the Greek Attic numerals and formed the inspiration for the later Roman numerals via the Old Italic script.
Etruscan Arabic Symbol * Old Italic
θu 1 Etruscan Numeral 1.svg 𐌠
maχ 5 Etruscan Numeral 5.svg 𐌡
śar 10 Etruscan Numeral 10.svg 𐌢
muvalχ 50 Etruscan Numeral 50.svg 𐌣
? 100 Etruscan Numeral 100.svg or C 𐌟
There is very little surviving evidence of these numerals. Examples are known of the symbols for larger numbers, but it is unknown which symbol represents which number. Thanks to the numbers written out on the Tuscania dice, there is agreement that zal, ci, huθ and śa are the numbers up to six (besides 1 and 5). The assignment depends on whether the numbers on opposite faces of Etruscan dice add up to seven, like nowadays
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Kharosthi Numerals
Egyptian hieroglyphs 32 c. BCE --->
  • Proto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCE
  • Phoenician 12 c. BCE
  • Libyco-Berber 3 c. BCE
  • Paleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE
  • Aramaic 8 c. BCE
  • ---> --->
  • Hebrew 3 c. BCE
  • Pahlavi 3 c. BCE
  • Palmyrene 2 c. BCE
  • Syriac 2 c. BCE
  • --->
  • Sogdian 2 c. BCE
  • Old Uyghur
  • ---> --->
  • Mandaic 2 c
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