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Indian Corn
Flint
Flint
corn ( Zea mays
Zea mays
var. indurata; also known as Indian corn or sometimes calico corn) is a variant of maize, the same species as common corn.[1] Because each kernel has a hard outer layer to protect the soft endosperm, it is likened to being hard as flint; hence the name.[2] The six major types of corn are dent corn, flint corn, pod corn, popcorn, flour corn, and sweet corn.[3]Contents1 History 2 Distinctive traits2.1 Coloration3 Uses 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] With less soft starch than dent corn ( Zea mays
Zea mays
indentata), flint corn does not have the dents in each kernel from which dent corn gets its name.[4] This is one of the three types of corn cultivated by Native Americans, both in New England
New England
and across the northern tier, including by tribes such as the Pawnee on the Great Plains
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Species
In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic. For example, with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, or in a ring species, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
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Traditional Italian Maize Varieties
Traditional Italian maize varieties
Traditional Italian maize varieties
have been, according to historical, archaeological, botany, morphological, and genetic evidence, molded since the introduction of this exotic cereal crop from the Americas
Americas
in the sixteenth century.[1]Contents1 History 2 Classification 3 Future 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The speciation and evolution of maize varieties in Italy, by means of man-made adaptive selection, maintained a broad genetic variability for about four centuries
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Blue Corn
Blue Corn (c. 1920 – May 3, 1999), also known as Crucita Calabaza, was a Native American potter from San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico, in the United States. She became famous for reviving San Ildefonso polychrome wares and had a very long and productive career.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Her grandmother first introduced her to pottery making at the age of three. Maria Martinez’s sister gave her the name “Blue Corn” during the naming ceremony, which is the Native American tradition of naming a child. Blue Corn attended school at the pueblo in her early years. She then went to Santa Fe Indian School, which was 24 miles (39 km) from home. While attending school in Santa Fe, her mother and father died, and she was sent to live with relatives in southern California
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Field Corn
In North America, field corn is corn (Zea mays) grown for livestock fodder, ethanol, cereal and processed food products. The principal field corn varieties are dent corn, flint corn, flour corn, including blue corn (Zea mays amylacea)[1] and waxy corn.[2] Field corn
Field corn
primarily grown for livestock feed and ethanol production is allowed to mature fully before being shelled off the cob before being stored in silos, pits, bins or grain "flats"
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MON 810
The MON 810
MON 810
corn is a genetically modified maize used around the world. It is a Zea mays line known as YieldGard from the company Monsanto.[1] This plant is a genetically modified organism (GMO) designed to combat crop loss due to insects. There is an inserted gene in the DNA
DNA
of MON810 which allows the plant to make a protein that harms insects that try to eat it
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MON 863
MON 863
MON 863
is a genetically engineered variety of maize produced by Monsanto
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Quality Protein Maize
The grain of quality protein maize (QPM) varieties contains nearly twice as much lysine and tryptophan, amino acids that are essential for humans and monogastric animals. QPM is a product of conventional plant breeding (i.e., it is not genetically modified) and an example of biofortification. QPM was developed by Surinder Vasal and Evangelina Villegas at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center
(CIMMYT) in the late 1990s. For their achievement, they won the 2000 World Food Prize.[1]Contents1 Need for quality protein maize 2 Development2.1 Vasal-Villegas team3 Impact 4 ReferencesNeed for quality protein maize[edit] In Central and South America, Africa, and Asia, several hundred million people rely on maize as their principal daily food, for weaning babies, and for feeding livestock
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Shoepeg Corn
Shoepeg corn
Shoepeg corn
is a cultivar of white sweetcorn valued for its sweetness. It is characterized by small, narrow kernels tightly and unevenly packed on the cob. The corn has a sweet, mild flavor. The most common variety of shoepeg corn available today is Country Gentleman.[1]Shoepeg cornNutritional value per 2/3 cup of kernels (89g)Energy 100 kcal (420 kJ)Carbohydrates20gSugars 5gDietary fiber 1gFat1gProtein3gVitamins Vitamin
Vitamin
C(4%) 3.6 mgUnits μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams IU = International unitsPercentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults. Shoepeg corn
Shoepeg corn
is popular in some regions of the United States, particularly in the South
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Genetically Modified Maize
Genetically modified maize
Genetically modified maize
(corn) is a genetically modified crop. Specific maize strains have been genetically engineered to express agriculturally-desirable traits, including resistance to pests and to herbicides. Maize
Maize
strains with both traits are now in use in multiple countries. GM maize has also caused controversy with respect to possible health effects, impact on other insects and impact on other plants via gene flow
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Waxy Corn
Waxy corn
Waxy corn
(maize) was found in China
China
in 1909. As this plant showed many peculiar traits, the American breeders long used it as a genetic marker to tag the existence of hidden genes in other maize breeding programs. In 1922 a researcher found that the endosperm of waxy maize contained only amylopectin and no amylose starch molecule in opposition to normal dent maize varieties that contain both. Until World War II, the main source of starch in the USA was tapioca but when Japan
Japan
severed the supply lines of the States, they forced processors to turn to waxy maize. Amylopectin
Amylopectin
or waxy starch is now used mainly in food products, but also in the textile, adhesive, corrugating and paper industry. When feeding trials later on showed that waxy maize could produce more efficient feed gains than normal dent maize, interest in waxy maize suddenly expanded
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Bolivia Maize Varieties
The varieties of Bolivian maize are the result of thousands of years of selective breeding for superior agronomic and cooking traits. Climate and soil diversity is a key feature of the landscape of Bolivia, a country extending between 9° to 22° South and 57° to 69° West. The indigenous cultures that played a key role in the differentiation of the native Bolivian maize races were the Aymara in the north, the Sauces in central Bolivia, and the Yampara in the south
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Ecuador Maize Varieties
The varieties of Ecuadorian maize are the repository of a rich farming and cooking tradition. Maize
Maize
is cropped almost everywhere in Ecuador, with the exception of the Altiplano, the cold desert highlands 3000 meters above sea level. Maize
Maize
production is concentrated in the provinces of Loja, Azuay, and Pichincha, and to a lesser extant Bolívar, Chimborazo, Tungurahua, and Imbabura, provinces located in the mountains. Maize
Maize
is also found in the coastal provinces, Manabí, Esmeraldas, and Guayas, as well as Pastaza, part of the Ecuadorian Amazon.Contents1 Use as food 2 History 3 Contemporary classification 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUse as food[edit] Most traditional foods are strictly linked to specific maize kernel types as well as grinding and cooking techniques
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List Of Sweetcorn Varieties
This is a list of the most commonly cultivated varieties of sweet corn, and the approximate number of days from germination of corn plant to harvest. Unless otherwise noted with the term open pollinated, all varieties are hybrids. Genetically modified varieties only available to large-scale commercial growers, such as Bt corn
Bt corn
and glyphosate resistant corn, are not listed.Contents1 Standard (su)1.1 Yellow su 1.2 White su 1.3 Bicolor su 1.4 Multicolor su2 Sugary Extender (se)2.1 Yellow se 2.2 White se 2.3 Bicolor se 2.4 Multicolor se3 Supersweet (sh2)3.1 Yellow sh2 3.2 White sh2 3.3 Bicolor sh24 Synergistic (sy)4.1 Yellow sy 4.2 White sy 4.3 Bicolor sy5 Augmented Supersweet5.1 Yellow 5.2 White 5.3 Bicolor6 See also 7 References 8 External linksStandard (su)[edit] The oldest type of sweet corn, which contains more sugar and less starch than field corn intended for livestock
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Corncob
A corncob, also called cob of corn, is the central core of an ear of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). It is the part of the ear on which the kernels grow
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