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Index Of Advanced Dungeons
A dungeon is a room or cell in which prisoners are held, especially underground. Dungeons are generally associated with medieval castles, though their association with torture probably belongs more to the Renaissance
Renaissance
period. An oubliette or bottle dungeon is a form of dungeon which is accessible only from a hatch or hole (an angstloch) in a high ceiling.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Features 4 In fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingEtymology[edit] The word dungeon comes from French donjon (also spelled dongeon), which means "keep", the main tower of a castle. The first recorded instance of the word in English was near the beginning of the 14th century when it held the same meaning as donjon
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Dungeon (other)
A dungeon is an underground prison or vault. Dungeon
Dungeon
or donjon may also refer to: Role-playing games[edit] Dungeon
Dungeon
(video game), an early 1975 mainframe role-playing game The Dungeon
Dungeon
(video game), a 1993 Acorn Archimedes 3D role-playing game Dungeon, an alternative name for Zork, a computer game Dungeon
Dungeon
crawl, scenario in fantasy role-playing games in which heroes navigate a labyrinthine environment Dungeons (video game), a 2011 strategy video game Dungeons & Dragons, a popular role-playing game Dungeon
Dungeon
(magazine) Dungeon!, a board game published by TSR, Inc
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Garderobe
Garderobe
Garderobe
is a historic term for a room in a medieval castle. The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
gives as its first meaning a store-room for valuables, but also acknowledges "by extension, a private room, a bed-chamber; also a privy". Its most common use now is as a term for a castle toilet.Contents1 Store room 2 Toilet 3 Other languages 4 See also 5 ReferencesStore room[edit] Garderobe
Garderobe
derives from the French word for "wardrobe", a lockable place where clothes and other items are stored
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Richard Le Scrope
Richard le Scrope
Richard le Scrope
(c. 1350 – 8 June 1405), Bishop of Lichfield and Archbishop of York, was executed in 1405 for his participation in the Northern Rising against King Henry IV.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Rebellion and death 4 Shakespeare and Scrope 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksFamily[edit] Richard Scrope, born about 1350, was the third son of Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham, and his wife, Joan, whose surname is unknown
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Archbishop Of York
The Archbishop of York
York
is a senior bishop in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. The archbishop is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, which covers the northern regions of England (north of the Trent) as well as the Isle of Man. The Archbishop of York
York
is an ex officio member of the House of Lords
House of Lords
and is styled Primate of England (the Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
is the "Primate of All England"). The archbishop's throne (cathedra) is in York Minster
York Minster
in central York and his official residence is Bishopthorpe Palace
Bishopthorpe Palace
in the village of Bishopthorpe
Bishopthorpe
outside York
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James I Of Scotland
James I (late July 1394 – 21 February 1437), the youngest of three sons, was born in Dunfermline Abbey
Dunfermline Abbey
to King Robert III and his wife Annabella Drummond. By the time he was eight, both of his elder brothers were dead—Robert had died in infancy but David, Duke of Rothesay, died suspiciously in Falkland Palace
Falkland Palace
while being detained by his uncle, Robert, Duke of Albany. Although Albany was exonerated by parliament, fears for James's safety grew through the winter of 1405–1406 and plans were made to send him to France. In February 1406, James was accompanying nobles close to his father when they clashed with supporters of Archibald, 4th Earl of Douglas, forcing the prince to take refuge in the castle of the Bass Rock, a small islet in the Firth of Forth
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Charles, Duke Of Orléans
Charles of Orléans
Orléans
(24 November 1394 – 5 January 1465) was Duke of Orléans
Orléans
from 1407, following the murder of his father, Louis I, Duke of Orléans, on the orders of John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy.[1] He was also Duke of Valois, Count of Beaumont-sur-Oise
Beaumont-sur-Oise
and of Blois, Lord of Coucy, and the inheritor of Asti
Asti
in Italy via his mother Valentina Visconti, daughter of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan. He is now remembered as an accomplished medieval poet owing to the more than five hundred extant poems he produced, written in both French and English, during his 25 years spent as a prisoner of war.Contents1 Accession 2 Imprisonment 3 Poetry 4 Freedom 5 Marriage and children 6 Honours 7 Fictional accounts 8 Notes 9 Bibliography 10 External linksAccession[edit] Charles was born in Paris
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Gatehouse
A gatehouse is a building enclosing or accompanying a gateway for a town, religious house, castle, manor house, or other buildings of importance. There are numerous surviving examples in France, Austria and Germany.Contents1 History 2 England 3 France 4 United States 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Gatehouses made their first appearance in the early antiquity when it became necessary to protect the main entrance to a castle or town. Over time, they evolved into very complicated structures with many lines of defence. Strongly fortified gatehouses would normally include a drawbridge, one or more portcullises, machicolations, arrow loops and possibly even murder-holes where stones would be dropped on attackers. In some castles, the gatehouse was so strongly fortified it took on the function of a keep, sometimes referred to as a "gate keep"
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Caernarvon Castle
Caernarfon
Caernarfon
Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon), often anglicized as Carnarvon Castle, is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales
Wales
cared for by Cadw, the Welsh Government's historic environment service. There was a motte-and-bailey castle in the town of Caernarfon
Caernarfon
from the late 11th century until 1283 when King Edward I of England began replacing it with the current stone structure. The Edwardian town and castle acted as the administrative centre of north Wales
Wales
and as a result the defences were built on a grand scale. There was a deliberate link with Caernarfon's Roman past and the Roman fort of Segontium
Segontium
is nearby. While the castle was under construction, town walls were built around Caernarfon. The work cost between £20,000 and £25,000 from the start until the end of work in 1330
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Eugène Viollet-le-Duc
Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (French: [øʒɛn vjɔlɛlədyk]; 27 January 1814 – 17 September 1879) was a French architect and author who restored many prominent medieval landmarks in France, including those which had been damaged or abandoned during the French Revolution. His major restoration projects included Notre Dame Cathedral, the Basilica of Saint Denis, Mont Saint-Michel, Sainte-Chapelle, and the medieval walls of the city of Carcasonne
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Hatchway
A trapdoor is a sliding or hinged door, flush with the surface of a floor, roof, or ceiling, or in the stage of a theatre.[1] A hatch, an opening which may also be in a wall and need not be flush with the surface, is similar; in some cases either name is applicable. A small door in a wall, floor or ceiling used to gain access to equipment is called an access hatch or access door.Contents1 History 2 Gallows 3 Railways 4 Biology 5 Star traps in theatre 6 Fiction 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Deck hatch of the Omega, the last square-rigged sailing cargo shipOriginally, trapdoors were sack traps in mills, and allowed the sacks to pass up through the mill while naturally falling back to a closed position.[2] Many buildings with flat roofs have hatches that provide access to the roof; on ships, hatches—usually not flush, and never called trapdoors—provide access to the deck
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Trapdoor
A trapdoor is a sliding or hinged door, flush with the surface of a floor, roof, or ceiling, or in the stage of a theatre.[1] A hatch, an opening which may also be in a wall and need not be flush with the surface, is similar; in some cases either name is applicable. A small door in a wall, floor or ceiling used to gain access to equipment is called an access hatch or access door.Contents1 History 2 Gallows 3 Railways 4 Biology 5 Star traps in theatre 6 Fiction 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Deck hatch of the Omega, the last square-rigged sailing cargo shipOriginally, trapdoors were sack traps in mills, and allowed the sacks to pass up through the mill while naturally falling back to a closed position.[2] Many buildings with flat roofs have hatches that provide access to the roof; on ships, hatches—usually not flush, and never called trapdoors—provide access to the deck
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Metaphor
A metaphor is a figure of speech that directly refers to one thing by mentioning another for rhetorical effect.[1] It may provide clarity or identify hidden similarities between two ideas. Antithesis, hyperbole, metonymy and simile are all types of metaphor.[2] One of the most commonly cited examples of a metaphor in English literature is the "All the world's a stage" monologue from As You Like It:All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances ... —William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 2/7[3]This quotation expresses a metaphor because the world is not literally a stage. By asserting that the world is a stage, Shakespeare uses points of comparison between the world and a stage to convey an understanding about the mechanics of the world and the behavior of the people within it. The Philosophy of Rhetoric
Rhetoric
(1937) by rhetorician I. A
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Warwick Castle
Warwick
Warwick
Castle
Castle
is a medieval castle developed from an original built by William the Conqueror in 1068. Warwick
Warwick
is the county town of Warwickshire, England, situated on a bend of the River Avon. The original wooden motte-and-bailey castle was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century. During the Hundred Years War, the facade opposite the town was refortified, resulting in one of the most recognisable examples of 14th-century military architecture. It was used as a stronghold until the early 17th century, when it was granted to Sir Fulke Greville by James I
James I
in 1604
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Richard II Of England
Richard II (6 January 1367 – c. 14 February 1400), also known as Richard of Bordeaux, was King of England
King of England
from 1377 until he was deposed on 30 September 1399. Richard, a son of Edward the Black Prince, was born in Bordeaux
Bordeaux
during the reign of his grandfather, Edward III. His father was Prince of Aquitaine. Richard was the younger brother of Edward of Angoulême, upon whose death Richard, at three years of age, became second in line to the throne after his father. Upon the death of Richard's father prior to the death of Edward III, Richard, by primogeniture, became the heir apparent to the throne. With Edward III's death the following year, Richard succeeded to the throne at the age of ten. During Richard's first years as king, government was in the hands of a series of councils. Most of the aristocracy preferred this to a regency led by the king's uncle, John of Gaunt, yet Gaunt remained highly influential
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Alnwick Castle
11th centuryListed Building – Grade IDesignated 1 January 1985Reference no. 1001041[1] Alnwick
Alnwick
Castle
Castle
(/ˈænɪk/ ( listen)) is a castle and stately home in Alnwick
Alnwick
in the English county of Northumberland. It is the seat of the Duke of Northumberland, built following the Norman conquest, and renovated and remodelled a number of times
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