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Incontinence (philosophy)
Incontinence ("a want of continence or self-restraint") is often used by philosophers to translate the Greek term Akrasia
Akrasia
(ἀκρασία). Used to refer to a lacking in moderation or self-control, especially related to sexual desire,[1] incontinence may also be called wantonness.Contents1 Aristotle 2 Later developments 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksAristotle[edit] Aristotle
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Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
(also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism
Romanticism
was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical
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Marianne Dashwood
Marianne Dashwood
Marianne Dashwood
is a fictional character in the Jane Austen
Jane Austen
novel Sense and Sensibility. The 16-year-old second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dashwood, she embodies the "sensibility" of the title, as opposed to her elder sister Elinor's "sense".[2]As seen in this 19th-century illustration, Marianne's joys, loves, and sorrows know no restraint, opposed to her sister Elinor's 'propriety.'She embraces spontaneity, excessive sensibility, love of nature, and romantic idealism: Marianne weeps dramatically when their family must depart from "dear, dear Norland", and later in the book, exclaims, "Oh! with what transporting sensations have I formerly seen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them driven in showers about me by the wind! What feelings have they, the season, the air altogether inspired! Now there is no one to regard them
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Seven Deadly Sins
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t eThe seven deadly sins, also known as the capital vices or cardinal sins, is a grouping and classification of vices within Christian teachings.[1] Behaviours or habits are classified under this category if they directly give birth to other immoralities.[2] According to the standard list, they are pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth,[2] which are also contrary to the seven virtues
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Gratification
Gratification
Gratification
is the pleasurable emotional reaction of happiness in response to a fulfillment of a desire or goal. Gratification, like all emotions, is a motivator of behavior and thus plays a role in the entire range of human social systems.Contents1 Instant and delayed gratification1.1 Criticism2 Bipolar disorder 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksInstant and delayed gratification[edit] The term instant gratification is often used to label the satisfactions gained by more impulsive behaviors: choosing now over tomorrow
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Emotional Intelligence
Emotional intelligence (EI), also known as Emotional quotient (EQ) and Emotional Intelligence
Intelligence
Quotient (EIQ)[1], is the capability of individuals to recognize their own emotions and those of others, discern between different feelings and label them appropriately, use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, and manage and/or adjust emotions to adapt to environments or achieve one's goal(s).[2] Although the term first appeared in a 1964 paper by Michael Beldoch, it gained popularity in the 1995 book by that title, written by the author, and science journalist Daniel Goleman.[3] Since this time, Goleman's 1995 analysis of EI has been criticized within the scientific community,[4] despite prolific reports of its usefulness in the popular press.[5][6][7][8] There are currently several models of EI
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Antinomianism
Antinomianism
Antinomianism
(from the Greek: ἀντί, "against" + νόμος, "law"), is any view which rejects laws or legalism and is against moral, religious, or social norms (Latin: mores), or is at least considered to do so.[1] In Christianity, an antinomian is one who takes the principle of salvation by faith and divine grace to the point of asserting that the saved are not bound to follow the Law of Moses.[2] The distinction between antinomian and other Christian views on moral law is that antinomians believe that obedience to the law is motivated by an internal principle flowing from belief rather than from any external compulsion.[3] Examples of antinomians being confronted by the religious establishment include Martin Luther's critique of antinomianism, the Antinomian Controversy
Antinomian Controversy
of the 17th century Massachusetts Bay Colony and the tenth-century Sufi
Sufi
mystic Mansur Al-Hallaj
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Arnold J. Toynbee
Arnold Joseph Toynbee
Joseph Toynbee
CH (/ˈtɔɪnbi/; 14 April 1889 – 22 October 1975) was a British historian, philosopher of history, research professor of international history at the London
London
School of Economics and the University of London
London
and author of numerous books
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
(/ruːˈsoʊ/;[1] French: [ʒɑ̃ʒak ʁuso]; 28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century, mainly active in France. His political philosophy influenced the Enlightenment across Europe, as well as aspects of the French Revolution
French Revolution
and the overall development of modern political and educational thought. Rousseau's novel Emile, or On Education
Education
is a treatise on the education of the whole person for citizenship
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William Blake
William Blake
Blake
(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake
Blake
is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age
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Sensibility
Sensibility
Sensibility
refers to an acute perception of or responsiveness toward something, such as the emotions of another. This concept emerged in eighteenth-century Britain, and was closely associated with studies of sense perception as the means through which knowledge is gathered
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Edmund Spenser
Edmund Spenser
Edmund Spenser
(/ˈspɛnsər/; 1552/1553 – 13 January 1599) was an English poet best known for The Faerie Queene, an epic poem and fantastical allegory celebrating the Tudor dynasty
Tudor dynasty
and Elizabeth I. He is recognized as one of the premier craftsmen of nascent Modern English verse, and is often considered one of the greatest poets in the English language.Contents1 Life 2 Rhyme and reason 3 The Shepherd's Calendar 4 The Faerie Queene 5 Shorter poems 6 The Spenserian stanza and sonnet 7 Influences 8 A View of the Present State of Ireland 9 List of works 10 Editions 11 References 12 Sources 13 External linksLife[edit] Edmund Spenser
Edmund Spenser
was born in East Smithfield, London, around the year 1552, though there is some ambiguity as to the exact date of his birth. His parenthood is obscure, but he was probably the son of John Spenser, a journeyman clothmaker
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Jane Austen
Jane Austen
Jane Austen
(UK: /ˈɒstɪn/; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism.[2][b] Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars. With the publications of Sense and Sensibility
Sense and Sensibility
(1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park
Mansfield Park
(1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer
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The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene
is an English epic poem by Edmund Spenser. Books I to III were first published in 1590, and then republished in 1596 together with books IV to VI. The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene
is notable for its form: it is one of the longest poems in the English language and the origin of a verse form that came to be known as Spenserian stanza.[1] On a literal level, the poem follows several knights in an examination of several virtues, though it is primarily an allegorical work, and can be read on several levels of allegory, including as praise (or, later, criticism) of Queen Elizabeth I
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A Study Of History
A Study of History
A Study of History
is a 12-volume universal history by the British historian Arnold J. Toynbee, published in 1934–61
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