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Immorality
Immorality is the violation of moral laws, norms or standards. Immorality is normally applied to people or actions, or in a broader sense, it can be applied to groups or corporate bodies, beliefs, religions, and works of art.Contents1 Aristotle 2 Religion and sexuality 3 Sexual immorality 4 Modernity 5 Immoral psychoanalysis 6 Literary references 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksAristotle[edit] Aristotle
Aristotle
saw many vices as excesses or deficits in relation to some virtue, as cowardice and rashness relate to courage
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Wickedness
Wickedness, is generally considered a synonym for evil or sinfulness. Among theologians and philosophers, it has the more specific meaning of evil committed consciously and of free will.[1] It can also be considered the quality or state of being wicked.[2] The term wickedness dates back to the 1300s and is derived from the words wicked and -ness. Wicked is an extended form of the term wick meaning bad and is also associated with the Old English term wicca meaning wizard. There isn’t a corresponding verb to the term, but the term wretched is also associated with the term. The term -ness is a word forming element denoting action, quality or state and is typically added to an adjective or past participle to make it an abstract noun
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Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The term ethics derives from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἠθικός (ethikos), from ἦθος (ethos), meaning 'habit, custom'. The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values.[2] Ethics
Ethics
seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime
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T. E. Lawrence
First World WarArab Revolt Siege of Medina Battle of Aqaba Capture of Damascus Battle of MegiddoAwards Companion of the Order of the Bath[1] Distinguished Service Order[2] Knight of the Legion of Honour
Legion of Honour
(France)[3] Croix de guerre (France)[4]Thomas Edward Lawrence, CB, DSO (16 August 1888 – 19 May 1935) was a British archaeologist, military officer, diplomat, and writer. He was renowned for his liaison role during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign and the Arab Revolt
Arab Revolt
against the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
during the First World War
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De Quincey
Thomas Penson De Quincey (/ˈtɒməs də ˈkwɪnsi/;[1] 15 August 1785 – 8 December 1859) was an English essayist, best known for his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
(1821).[2][3] Many scholars suggest that in publishing this work De Quincey inaugurated the tradition of addiction literature in the West.[4]Contents1 Life and work1.1 Child and student 1.2 Journalist 1.3 Translator and essayist2 Financial pressures 3 Medical issues 4 Collected works 5 Influence 6 Major publications 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife and work[edit] Child and student[edit] De Quincey was born at 86 Cross Street, Manchester, Lancashire.[5] His father was a successful merchant with an interest in literature who died when he was quite young
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On Murder Considered As One Of The Fine Arts
"On Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts" is an essay by Thomas De Quincey first published in 1827 in Blackwood's Magazine. The essay is a fictional, satirical account of an address made to a gentleman's club concerning the aesthetic appreciation of murder. It focuses particularly on a series of murders allegedly committed in 1811 by John Williams in the neighborhood of Ratcliffe Highway, London. The essay was enthusiastically received[1] and led to numerous sequels, including "A Second Paper on Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts" in 1839 and a "Postscript" in 1854. These essays have exerted a strong influence on subsequent literary representations of crime and were lauded by such critics as G. K
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Criminality
In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority.[1] The term "crime" does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted definition,[2] though statutory definitions have been provided for certain purposes.[3] The most popular view is that crime is a category created by law; in other words, something is a crime if declared as such by the relevant and applicable law.[2] One proposed definition is that a crime or offence (or criminal offence) is an act harmful not only to some individual but also to a community, society or the state ("a public wrong"). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law.[1][4] The notion that acts such as murder, rape and theft are to be prohibited exists worldwide.[5] What precisely is a criminal offence is defined by criminal law of each country
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Deviance (sociology)
In sociology, deviance describes an action or behavior that violates social norms, including a formally enacted rule (e.g., crime),[1] as well as informal violations of social norms (e.g., rejecting folkways and mores). Although deviance may have a negative connotation, the violation of social norms is not always a negative action; positive deviation exists in some situations. This is where the norm is violated, yet the behavior can still be classified as positive or acceptable.[2] It is the purview of criminologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and sociologists to study how these norms are created, how they change over time, and how they are enforced. Norms are rules and expectations by which members of society are conventionally guided. Deviance is an absence of conformity to these norms. Social norms differ from culture to culture
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Disinhibition
In psychology, disinhibition is a lack of restraint manifested in disregard for social conventions, impulsivity, and poor risk assessment. Disinhibition affects motor, instinctual, emotional, cognitive, and perceptual aspects with signs and symptoms similar to the diagnostic criteria for mania
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Antinomianism
Antinomianism
Antinomianism
(from the Greek: ἀντί, "against" + νόμος, "law"), is any view which rejects laws or legalism and is against moral, religious, or social norms (Latin: mores), or is at least considered to do so.[1] In Christianity, an antinomian is one who takes the principle of salvation by faith and divine grace to the point of asserting that the saved are not bound to follow the Law of Moses.[2] The distinction between antinomian and other Christian views on moral law is that antinomians believe that obedience to the law is motivated by an internal principle flowing from belief rather than from any external compulsion.[3] Examples of antinomians being confronted by the religious establishment include Martin Luther's critique of antinomianism, the Antinomian Controversy
Antinomian Controversy
of the 17th century Massachusetts Bay Colony and the tenth-century Sufi
Sufi
mystic Mansur Al-Hallaj
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Baudelaire
Charles Pierre Baudelaire (/ˌboʊdəlˈɛər/;[1] French: [ʃaʁl bodlɛʁ] ( listen); April 9, 1821 – August 31, 1867) was a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. His most famous work, Les Fleurs du mal
Les Fleurs du mal
(The Flowers of Evil), expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire's highly original style of prose-poetry influenced a whole generation of poets including Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud
Arthur Rimbaud
and Stéphane Mallarmé
Stéphane Mallarmé
among many others
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Bernard Mandeville
Bernard Mandeville, or Bernard de Mandeville (/ˈmændəˌvɪl/; 15 November 1670 – 21 January 1733), was an Anglo-Dutch philosopher, political economist and satirist. Born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, he lived most of his life in England and used English for most of his published works
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Harm
Harm
Harm
is a moral and legal concept. Bernard Gert
Bernard Gert
construes harms as any of the following:[1]pain death disability loss of ability or freedom loss of pleasure. Joel Feinberg gives an account of harms as setbacks to interests.[2] He distinguishes welfare interests from ulterior interests
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Immortality
Immortality
Immortality
is eternal life, being exempt from death, unending existence.[2] Some modern species may possess biological immortality. Certain scientists, futurists, and philosophers have theorized about the immortality of the human body, with some suggesting that human immortality may be achievable in the first few decades of the 21st century. Other advocates believe that life extension is a more achievable goal in the short term, with immortality awaiting further research breakthroughs. The absence of aging would provide humans with biological immortality, but not invulnerability to death by disease or physical trauma; although mind uploading could solve that issue if it proved possible
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Hedonism
Hedonism
Hedonism
is a school of thought that argues that pleasure and happiness are the primary or most important intrinsic goods and the aim of human life.[1] A hedonist strives to maximize net pleasure (pleasure minus pain), but when having finally gained that pleasure, either through intrinsic or extrinsic goods, happiness remains stationary. Ethical hedonism is the idea that all people have the right to do everything in their power to achieve the greatest amount of pleasure possible to them. It is also the idea that every person's pleasure should far surpass their amount of pain. Ethical hedonism is said to have been started by Aristippus
Aristippus
of Cyrene, a student of Socrates
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Libertine
A libertine is one devoid of most moral or sexual restraints, which are seen as unnecessary or undesirable, especially one who ignores or even spurns accepted morals and forms of behaviour sanctified by the larger society.[1][2] Libertinism is described as an extreme form of hedonism.[3] Libertines put value on physical pleasures, meaning those experienced through the senses. As a philosophy, libertinism gained new-found adherents in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, particularly in France
France
and Great Britain
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