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Illinois Fighting Illini
The Illinois
Illinois
Fighting Illini (IPA /ɪ.laɪ.naɪ/) are the intercollegiate athletic teams of the University of Illinois
Illinois
at Urbana–Champaign
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Bristow Adams
Bristow Adams
Bristow Adams
(November 11, 1875 – November 1956[1]) was an American journalist, professor, forester, and illustrator. Adams was born in Washington, D.C..[2] He taught at Cornell University from 1914 to 1945. Adams also founded the Stanford Chaparral, the oldest humor magazine in the west, in 1899.[3] Adams created at least two scarce large photolithographed rowing posters between 1900 and 1910, one representing Harvard and one Cornell, both copyrighted by The Potomac Press, Washington D.C. and printed by Andrew B. Graham of Washington. References[edit]^ Cornell University ^ Leonard, John William; Marquis, Albert Nelson, eds. (1908), Who's who in America, 5, Chicago: Marquis Who's Who, Incorporated, p. 8.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-06-27
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College Athletics
College athletics
College athletics
or college sports encompasses non-professional, collegiate and university-level competitive sports and games requiring physical skill, and the systems of training that prepare athletes for competition performance. The assimilation of sport into academic life at Cambridge University in the nineteenth century was documented by Andrew Warwick:Competitive sport was employed to improve discipline, health, and appetite while keeping students away from illicit activities when not in the classroom
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2013–14 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Season
The 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season
2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season
began in November with the 2K Sports Classic and ended with the Final Four in Arlington, Texas
Arlington, Texas
April 5–7
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Cross Country Running
Cross country running
Cross country running
is a sport in which teams and individuals run a race on open-air courses over natural terrain such as dirt or grass. Sometimes the runners are referred to as harriers (dogs).[1] The course, typically 4–12 kilometres (2.5–7.5 mi) long, may include surfaces of grass, and earth, pass through woodlands and open country, and include hills, flat ground and sometimes gravel road. It is both an individual and a team sport; runners are judged on individual times and teams by a points-scoring method. Both men and women of all ages compete in cross country, which usually takes place during autumn and winter, and can include weather conditions of rain, sleet, snow or hail, and a wide range of temperatures. Cross country running
Cross country running
is one of the disciplines under the umbrella sport of athletics, and is a natural terrain version of long-distance track and road running
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Golf
Golf
Golf
is a club-and-ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible. Golf, unlike most ball games, cannot and does not utilize a standardized playing area, and coping with the varied terrains encountered on different courses is a key part of the game. The game at the highest level is played on a course with an arranged progression of 18 holes, though recreational courses can be smaller, usually 9 holes. Each hole on the course must contain a tee box to start from, and a putting green containing the actual hole or cup (4.25 inches in diameter)
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Track And Field
Track and field
Track and field
is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing.[1] The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and jumping events take place. Track and field
Track and field
is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking. The foot racing events, which include sprints, middle- and long-distance events, race walking and hurdling, are won by the athlete with the fastest time. The jumping and throwing events are won by the athlete who achieves the greatest distance or height. Regular jumping events include long jump, triple jump, high jump and pole vault, while the most common throwing events are shot put, javelin, discus and hammer
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College Soccer
College
College
soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. While it is most widespread in the United States, it is also prominent in South Korea and Canada. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are strictly amateur and are not paid. College
College
soccer in the United States is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the sports regulatory body for major universities, and by the governing bodies for smaller universities and colleges
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Collegiate Wrestling
Collegiate wrestling, sometimes known in the United States as folkstyle wrestling, is a style of amateur wrestling practiced at the college and university level in the United States. Collegiate wrestling emerged from the folk wrestling styles practiced in the early history of the United States. This style, with some slight modifications, is also practiced at the high school and middle school levels, and also among younger participants, where it is known as scholastic wrestling. These names help distinguish collegiate wrestling from other styles of wrestling that are practiced around the world such as those in the Olympic Games: freestyle wrestling and Greco-Roman wrestling. Collegiate wrestling, like its international counterpart, freestyle wrestling, has its main origins in catch-as-catch-can wrestling.[1] In both styles, the ultimate goal is to pin the opponent to the mat, which results in an immediate win
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Volleyball
Volleyball
Volleyball
is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules.[1] It has been a part of the official program of the Summer Olympic Games
Olympic Games
since 1964. The complete rules are extensive, but simply, play proceeds as follows: a player on one of the teams begins a 'rally' by serving the ball (tossing or releasing it and then hitting it with a hand or arm), from behind the back boundary line of the court, over the net, and into the receiving team's court. The receiving team must not let the ball be grounded within their court. The team may touch the ball up to 3 times but individual players may not touch the ball twice consecutively
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Gymnastics
Gymnastics
Gymnastics
is a sport practiced by men and women that requires balance, strength, flexibility, agility, coordination, endurance and control. The movements involved in gymnastics contribute to the development of the arms, legs, shoulders, back, chest and abdominal muscle groups. Alertness, precision, daring, self-confidence and self-discipline are mental traits that can also be developed through gymnastics.[1] Gymnastics
Gymnastics
evolved from exercises used by the ancient Greeks that included skills for mounting and dismounting a horse, and from circus performance skills. Most forms of competitive gymnastics events are governed by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique
Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique
(FIG). Each country has its own national governing body (BIW) affiliated to FIG. Competitive artistic gymnastics is the best known of the gymnastic events
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College Softball
College softball
College softball
is softball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. College softball
College softball
is normally played by women at the Intercollegiate level, whereas college baseball is normally played by men. As with other intercollegiate sports, most college softball in the United States
United States
is played under the auspices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) or the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). The NCAA writes the rules of play, while each sanctioning body supervises season-ending tournaments. The final rounds of the NCAA tournaments are known as the Women's College World Series (WCWS); one is held on each of the three levels of competition sanctioned by the NCAA. The 2007 Women's College World Series took place in Don E
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Tennis
Tennis
Tennis
is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to play the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will. Tennis
Tennis
is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society and at all ages. The sport can be played by anyone who can hold a racket, including wheelchair users. The modern game of tennis originated in Birmingham, England, in the late 19th century as lawn tennis.[1] It had close connections both to various field (lawn) games such as croquet and bowls as well as to the older racket sport today called real tennis
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Diving
Diving
Diving
is the sport of jumping or falling into water from a platform or springboard, usually while performing acrobatics. Diving
Diving
is an internationally recognized sport that is part of the Olympic Games. In addition, unstructured and non-competitive diving is a recreational pastime. Diving
Diving
is one of the most popular Olympic sports with spectators. Competitors possess many of the same characteristics as gymnasts and dancers, including strength, flexibility, kinaesthetic judgment and air awareness
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Swimming (sport)
Swimming is an individual or team sport that requires the use of ones arms and legs to move the body through water. The sport takes place in pools or open water (e.g., in a sea or lake). Competitive swimming is one of the most popular Olympic sports,[1] with varied distance events in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, freestyle, and individual medley. In addition to these individual events, four swimmers can take part in either a freestyle or medley relay. Swimming each stroke requires a set of specific techniques, and in competition, there are distinct regulations concerning the acceptable form for each individual stroke.[2] There are also regulations on what types of swimsuits, caps, jewelry and injury tape that are allowed at competitions
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College Baseball
College baseball
College baseball
is baseball that is played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education. In comparison to football and basketball, college competition in the United States plays a smaller role in developing professional players, as baseball's professional minor leagues are more extensive. Moving directly from high school to the professional level is more common in baseball than in football or basketball. However, if players enroll at a four-year college, they must complete three years to regain eligibility, unless they reach age 21 before starting their third year of attendance. Players who enroll at junior colleges (i.e., two-year institutions) regain eligibility after one year at that level. In the most recently completed 2017 season, there were 298 NCAA
NCAA
Division I teams in the United States (including schools transitioning from Division II to Division I). As with most other U.S
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