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Ik Onkar
Ek Onkar (Gurmukhi: ੴ, ਇੱਕ ਓਅੰਕਾਰ; Ekk Ōankār Punjabi pronunciation: [ɪkː oəŋkaɾ]) is the symbol that represents the One Supreme Reality[2] and is a central tenet of Sikh religious philosophy.[1] Ik (ਇੱਕ) means one and only one, who cannot be compared or contrasted with any other,[3] (ਓਅੰਕਾਰ) is the one universal ever flowing divine melody and existential unstruck, never-ending sound of God. To simplify Ik means one, Oang the creator and Kar means the creation. So the creator and his creation are not different and He the supreme creator resides everywhere and in everything. The sound is Oang (anhad naad) and Kar is the never ending continuation of Oang sound. This melody manifests in billions of galaxies and universes and leads to protect and preserve
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Ātman (Hinduism)
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Vedas
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu
Hindu
textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Salok
Shloka (Sanskrit: श्लोक śloka; meaning "song", from the root śru, "hear"[1]) is a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh poetic meter. It is the basis for Indian epic verse, and may be considered the Indian verse form par excellence, occurring, as it does, far more frequently than any other meter in classical Sanskrit
Sanskrit
poetry.[1] The Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and Ramayana, for example, are written almost exclusively in shlokas.[2] The traditional view is that this form of verse was involuntarily composed by Valmiki
Valmiki
in grief, the author of the Ramayana, on seeing a hunter shoot down one of two birds in love.[3] The shloka is treated as a couplet. Each hemistich (half-verse) of 16 syllables, composed of two Pādas of eight syllables, can take either a pathyā ("normal") form or one of several vipulā ("extended") forms
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Joseph Kitagawa
Joseph Mitsuo Kitagawa (March 8, 1915–October 7, 1992) was an eminent Japanese American scholar in religious studies. He was Professor Emeritus and Dean of the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
Divinity School. He is considered as one of the founders of the field of the history of religions. He is particularly known for his outstanding contributions to the study of religious traditions in Asia and intercultural understanding of the East and the West.[1] Kitagawa was born in Osaka, Japan. He graduated from Rikkyo University in Tokyo in 1937. He came to the United States to study theology in 1941. During World War II, Kitagawa was interned at the Minidoka War Relocation Center at Hunt, Idaho, where he remained until October 1945. He received his B.D. from Seabury-Western Theological Seminary in 1947. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
and joined the faculty of the Divinity School in 1951
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Vowel
Paired vowels are: unrounded • roundedManners of articulationObstruent    Stop     Affricate     Fricative        Strident            SibilantSonorant    Nasal     Approximant        Semivowel    Vowel     Vibrant        Flap/Tap         TrillLiquid    Rhotic     LateralOcclusive ContinuantAirstreamsEgressive Ingressive Ejective Implosive Nonexplosive Lingual (clicks) Linguo-pulmonic Linguo-ejective PercussiveSee alsoArticulatory phonetics Aspirated consonant No au
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Outline Of Sikhism
Outline may refer to: Outline (list), a document summary, in hierarchical list format Outline (software), a note-taking application Outline drawing, a sketch depicting the outer edges of a person or object, without interior details or shading
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Japji Sahib
Jap ji is a prayer at the beginning of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, considered the holy scripture of sikhs. It was composed by Guru Nanak Dev Ji, the first Sat Guru in the line of ten sikh gurus. Jap ji begins with Mool Mantra
Mool Mantra
and is followed by 38 pauris (stanzas) and ends with a final Salok at the end of this composition.[1] Jap ji is believed to be the first composition of Guru Nanak, and is now considered the comprehensive essence of sikh faith.[1] It is regarded amongst the most important Bani or 'set of verses' by the Sikhs, as it is the first Bani in Nitnem. Notable is Nanak's discourse on 'what is true worship' and what is the nature of God'
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Nitnem
Nitnem
Nitnem
(Punjabi: ਨਿਤਨੇਮ) (literally Daily Routine) is a collection of Sikh
Sikh
hymns (Gurbani) to be read minimally 3 different times of the day. These are mandatory and to be read by every Sikh[1] as expressed in the Sikh
Sikh
Rehat Maryada.[2] Optionally additional prayers may be added to a Sikh's nitnem
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Cannabis And Sikhism
In Sikhism, cannabis is generally prohibited, as are tobacco and alcohol. However, some Sikhs particularly of the Nihang
Nihang
community use edible cannabis in a religious context.Contents1 Prohibition 2 Usage2.1 Nihang
Nihang
Sikhs3 ReferencesProhibition[edit] The first Sikh guru, Guru Nanak, stated that using any mind altering substance (without medical purposes) is a distraction from God. Guru Nanak was offered bhang by the Mughal emperor Babur; Nanak however declined, and recited this shabad:Fear of Thee, o Lord, is my bhang, and my mind the pouch in which I carry it. Intoxicated with this bhang I have abandoned all interest in worldly concerns.[1]According to the Sikh Rehat Maryada, "a Sikh must not take hemp (cannabis), opium, liquor, tobacco, in short any intoxicant
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Brahma
Brahma
Brahma
(/ˈbrəhmɑː/; Sanskrit: ब्रह्मा, IAST: Brahmā) is a creator god in Hinduism. His consort is the goddess Saraswati[4] and he is the father of the Prajapatis.[5]He is depicted in Hindu
Hindu
iconography with four faces[6] and is also known as Svayambhu (self-born)[7] and Vāgīśa (Lord of speech and the creator of the four Vedas, one from each of his mouths).[6][8] Brahma
Brahma
is sometimes identified with the Vedic god Prajapati, as well as linked to Kama
Kama
and Hiranyagarbha (the cosmic egg)[9][10]. He is more prominently mentioned in the post-Vedic Hindu
Hindu
epics and the mythologies in the Puranas
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Monotheism
Monotheism
Monotheism
has been defined as the belief in the existence of only one god that created the world, is all-powerful and intervenes in the world.[1][2][3] A broader definition of monotheism is the belief in one god.[4][5][6][7] A distinction may be made between exclusive monotheism, and both inclusive monotheism and pluriform (panentheistic) monotheism which, while recognising various distinct gods, postulate some underlying unity.[8]
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