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Idalium
Idalion or Idalium
Idalium
(Greek: Ιδάλιον, Idalion) was an ancient city in Cyprus, in modern Dali, Nicosia District. The city was founded on the copper trade in the 3rd millennium BC. Its name in the 8th century BC was "Ed-di-al" as it appears on the Sargon Stele
Sargon Stele
of 707 BC, and a little later on the nl:Prism of Esarhaddon. Recent excavations have uncovered major buildings on the site which are open to visitors. A new museum is also near to the site.Contents1 History1.1 The ancient city 1.2 Cypro-Syllabic script2 Archaeology 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The ancient city[edit]Terracotta statue from Idalion, 7th or 6th century BC. Neues Museum, BerlinIdalion, Cup with mythological scenes, a sphinx frieze and the representation of a king vanquishing his enemies. Electrum, Cypro-Archaic I (8th–7th centuries BC)
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Cyprus
Cyprus,[f] officially the Republic of Cyprus,[g] is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean. Cyprus
Cyprus
is located south of Turkey, west of Syria
Syria
and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece. The earliest known human activity on the island dates to around the 10th millennium BC. Archaeological remains from this period include the well-preserved Neolithic
Neolithic
village of Khirokitia, and Cyprus
Cyprus
is home to some of the oldest water wells in the world.[9] Cyprus
Cyprus
was settled by Mycenaean Greeks in two waves in the 2nd millennium BC
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Samuel Birch
Samuel Birch
Samuel Birch
(/bɜːrtʃ/; 3 November 1813 – 27 December 1885) was a British Egyptologist
Egyptologist
and antiquary.Contents1 Biography 2 Publications 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Birch was the son of a rector at St Mary Woolnoth, London. He was educated at Merchant Taylors' School.[1] From an early age, his manifest tendency to the study of out-of-the-way subjects well suited his later interest in archaeology. After brief employment in the Record Office, he obtained, in 1836, an appointment to the antiquities department of the British Museum. The appointment was due to his knowledge of Chinese, which was unusual at that time. He soon broadened his research to Egyptian
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Cabinet Des Médailles
The Cabinet des Médailles,[Note 1] more formally known as Département des Monnaies, Médailles et Antiques de la Bibliothèque nationale de France, is a department of the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris. The Cabinet des Médailles
Cabinet des Médailles
is located in the Richelieu-Louvois building – the former main building of the library – on the Rue de Richelieu.[Note 2]The Cabinet des MédaillesEntrance to the Cabinet des MédaillesEstablished (1560-1574)Collectionscoins, engraved gems, and antiquities, with its distant origins in the treasuries of the French kings of the Middle Ages.* Berthouville TreasureCup of the Ptolemies Great Cameo of France Treasure of GourdonThe Cabinet des Médailles
Cabinet des Médailles
is a museum containing internationally important collections of coins, engraved gems, and antiquities, with its distant origins in the treasuries of the French kings of the Middle Ages
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Phoenicia
Coordinates: 34°07′25″N 35°39′04″E / 34.12361°N 35.65111°E / 34.12361; 35.65111Phoeniciaknʿn / kanaʿan  (Phoenician) Φοινίκη / Phoiníkē  (Greek)1500 BC[1]–539 BCMap of Phoenicia
Phoenicia
and its Mediterranean trade routesCapital Not specifiedLanguages Phoenician, PunicReligion Canaanite religionGovernment City-states ruled by kingsWell-known kings of Phoenician cities •  c. 1000 BC Ahiram •  969 – 936 BC Hiram I 
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Nicosia District
Nicosia
Nicosia
District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. Its main town is the island country's capital city, Nicosia
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Adonis
Adonis[a] was the mortal lover of the goddess Aphrodite
Aphrodite
in Greek mythology. In Ovid's first-century AD telling of the myth, he was conceived after Aphrodite
Aphrodite
cursed his mother Myrrha
Myrrha
to lust after her own father, King Cinyras
Cinyras
of Cyprus. Myrrha
Myrrha
had sex with her father in complete darkness for nine nights, but he discovered her identity and chased her with a sword. The gods transformed her into a myrrh tree and, in the form of a tree, she gave birth to Adonis. Aphrodite
Aphrodite
found the infant and gave him to be raised by Persephone, the queen of the Underworld
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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George Smith (assyriologist)
George Smith ( Chelsea, London
Chelsea, London
26 March 1840 – 19 August 1876), was a pioneering English Assyriologist who first discovered and translated the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the oldest-known written works of literature.[1]Contents1 Early life and early career 2 British Museum 3 Discovery of inscriptions 4 Epic of Gilgamesh
Epic of Gilgamesh
and expedition to Nineveh 5 Final expedition and death 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 Notes 9 External linksEarly life and early career[edit] As the son of a working-class family in Victorian England, Smith was limited in his ability to acquire a formal education.[2] At age fourteen, he was apprenticed to the London-based publishing house of Bradbury and Evans to learn banknote engraving, at which he excelled. From his youth, he was fascinated with Assyrian culture and history. In his spare time, he read everything that was available to him on the subject
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Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Temenos
Temenos (Greek: τέμενος; plural: τεμένη, temene)[1] is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy precinct: the Pythian race-course is called a temenos, the sacred valley of the Nile is the Νείλοιο πῖον τέμενος Κρονίδα ("the rich temenos of Cronides
Cronides
by the Nile"),[1][2] the Acropolis of Athens is the ἱερὸν τέμενος ("the holy temenos"; of Pallas).[1][3] The word derives from the Greek verb τέμνω (temnō), "to cut".[4][5] The earliest attested form of the word is the Mycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greek
𐀳𐀕𐀜, te-me-no, written in Linear B syllabic script.[6] The concept of temenos arose in classical Mediterranean
Mediterranean
cultures as an area reserved for worship of the gods
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Luigi Palma Di Cesnola
Luigi Palma di Cesnola
Luigi Palma di Cesnola
(July 29, 1832 – November 20, 1904), an Italian-American soldier, diplomat and amateur archaeologist, was born in Rivarolo Canavese, near Turin. He received the Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
for his actions during the American Civil War
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Metropolitan Museum Of Art
www.metmuseum.orgThe Metropolitan Museum of ArtU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkElevation by Simon FieldhouseBuilt 1874; 144 years ago (1874)Architect Richard Morris Hunt; also Calvert Vaux; Jacob Wrey MouldArchitectural style Beaux-ArtsNRHP reference # 86003556Significant datesAdded to NRHP January 29, 1972[5]Designated NHLJune 24, 1986[6] [7]The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
of New York, colloquially "the Met",[a] is the largest art museum in the United States. With 7.06 million visitors in 2016, it was the second most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most visited museum of any kind. [8] Its permanent collection contains over two million works,[9] divided among seventeen curatorial departments
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Nymphaeum
A nymphaeum or nymphaion (Ancient Greek: νυμφαῖον), in ancient Greece and Rome, was a monument consecrated to the nymphs, especially those of springs. These monuments were originally natural grottoes, which tradition assigned as habitations to the local nymphs. They were sometimes so arranged as to furnish a supply of water, as at Pamphylian Side. A nymphaeum dedicated to a local water nymph, Coventina, was built along Hadrian's Wall, in the northernmost reach of the Roman Empire. Subsequently, artificial grottoes took the place of natural ones.Contents1 Roman period 2 Mosaics 3 Later periods 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesRoman period[edit] The nymphaeum in Jerash, Jordan
Jordan
(illustration, right), was constructed in 191 AD. The fountain was originally embellished with marble facing on the lower level, painted plaster on the upper level, and topped with a half-dome roof, forming a giant niche
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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