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Ida Tarbell
IDA MINERVA TARBELL (November 5, 1857 – January 6, 1944) was an American teacher , author and journalist . She was one of the leading "muckrakers " of the progressive era of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and is thought to have pioneered investigative journalism . She is best known for her 1904 book, The History of the Standard Oil Company , which was listed as No. 5 in a 1999 list by New York University of the top 100 works of 20th-century American journalism. It was first serialized in McClure\'s Magazine from 1902 to 1904. She depicted John D. Rockefeller
John D. Rockefeller
as crabbed, miserly, money-grabbing, and viciously effective at monopolizing the oil trade. She wrote many other notable magazine series and biographies, including several works on President Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
, revealing his early life
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The Lion And The Mouse
THE LION AND THE MOUSE is one of Aesop\'s Fables , numbered 150 in the Perry Index . There are also Eastern variants of the story, all of which demonstrate mutual dependence regardless of size or status. In the Renaissance
Renaissance
the fable was provided with a sequel condemning social ambition. CONTENTS * 1 The fable in literature * 2 Artistic interpretations * 3 Popular applications * 4 The anti-fable * 5 Eastern versions * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links THE FABLE IN LITERATUREIn the oldest versions, a lion threatens a mouse that wakes him from sleep. The mouse begs forgiveness and makes the point that such unworthy prey would bring the lion no honour. The lion then agrees and sets the mouse free. Later, the lion is netted by hunters . Hearing it roaring, the mouse remembers its clemency and frees it by gnawing through the ropes
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Kappa Alpha Theta
Court Appointed Special
Special
Advocates (CASA), Kappa Alpha Theta Foundation, The Friendship Fund CHAPTERS 212 collegiate, 200+ alumnae MEMBERS 270,000+ collegiate HEADQUARTERS 8740 Founders Road Indianapolis
Indianapolis
, Indiana
Indiana
United States HOMEPAGE http://www.kappaalphatheta.org/KAPPA ALPHA THETA (ΚΑΘ), also known simply as THETA, is an international sorority founded on Jan. 27, 1870 at DePauw University , formerly Indiana
Indiana
Asbury. Kappa Alpha Theta was the first Greek-letter fraternity for women. The organization currently has more than 145 chapters at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. Theta's total living initiated membership as of January 23, 2017, totals more than 270,000. There are more than 200 alumnae chapters and circles worldwide
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Amity Township, Erie County, Pennsylvania
AMITY TOWNSHIP is a township in Erie County , Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
, United States. The population was 1,073 at the 2010 census. There are no longer any boroughs or villages in the township, after the disappearance of Arbuckle and Hatch Hollow. The latter was the birthplace of famed muckraker Ida M. Tarbell , who was born in her grandfather's log cabin in Hatch Hollow in 1857. CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 Demographics * 3 References * 4 External links GEOGRAPHYAmity Township is in southeastern Erie County. According to the United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
, the it has a total area of 28.2 square miles (73.0 km2), of which 28.0 square miles (72.6 km2) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.4 km2), or 0.55%, is water. French Creek flows through the township, impounded by Union City Dam in neighboring Waterford Township
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Prohibitionists
PROHIBITION is the illegality of the manufacturing , storage in barrels or bottles , transportation , sale, possession, and consumption of alcohol including alcoholic beverages , or a period of time during which such illegality was enforced. Drugs were a major factor in alcohol prohibition
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United Methodist
The UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (UMC) is a mainline Protestant denomination and a major part of Methodism
Methodism
. In the 19th century, its main predecessor—the Methodist Episcopal Church
Methodist Episcopal Church
—was a leader in Evangelicalism
Evangelicalism
. The present denomination was founded in 1968 in Dallas, Texas
Dallas, Texas
by union of the Methodist
Methodist
Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church . The UMC traces its roots back to the revival movement of John and Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
in England as well as the Great Awakening in the United States. As such, the church's theological orientation is decidedly Wesleyan . It embraces both liturgical and evangelical elements. It has a connectional polity , a typical feature of a number of Methodist
Methodist
denominations
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South Improvement Company
The SOUTH IMPROVEMENT COMPANY was a short lived Pennsylvania corporation founded in 1871. It was created by major railroad interests, but was widely seen as part of John D. Rockefeller
John D. Rockefeller
's early efforts to organize and control the oil and natural gas industries in the United States which eventually became Standard Oil
Standard Oil
. Although it lasted less than a year and never shipped any oil, the South Improvement Company scheme caused widespread attention to be focused on the relationships between big railroads and big businesses which wanted and demanded favorable treatment. HISTORY Thomas A. Scott , president of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Railroad set up the South Improvement Company in the fall of 1871. The scheme was intended to benefit both the railroads and major refiners, notably those controlled by Rockefeller through secret rebates
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Mark Twain
SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name MARK TWAIN, was an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer. Among his novels are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "The Great American Novel ". Twain was raised in Hannibal, Missouri , which later provided the setting for Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. He served an apprenticeship with a printer and then worked as a typesetter, contributing articles to the newspaper of his older brother Orion Clemens . He later became a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. He referred humorously to his lack of success at mining, turning to journalism for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise
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Home Study Course
DISTANCE EDUCATION or DISTANCE LEARNING is the education of students who may not always be physically present at a school . Traditionally, this usually involved CORRESPONDENCE COURSES wherein the student corresponded with the school via post . Today it involves ONLINE EDUCATION. Courses that are conducted (51 percent or more) are either hybrid , blended or 100% distance learning. Massive open online courses (MOOCs), offering large-scale interactive participation and open access through the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
or other network technologies, are recent developments in distance education. A number of other terms (distributed learning, e-learning, online learning, etc.) are used roughly synonymously with distance education
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Chautauqua, New York
CHAUTAUQUA is a town and lake resort community in Chautauqua County , New York , United States. The population was 4,464 at the 2010 census. The town is named after Chautauqua Lake . The traditional meaning remains "bag tied in the middle". The suggested meanings of this Seneca word have become numerous: "the place where one is lost"; "the place of easy death"; "fish taken out"; "foggy place"; "high up"; "two moccasins fastened together"; and "a bag tied in the middle". The town of Chautauqua is in the western part of the county on the northwestern end of Chautauqua Lake. It is northwest of Jamestown . Chautauqua is famous as the home of the Chautauqua Institution , the birthplace in 1875 of the Chautauqua Movement of educational and cultural centers
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American Civil War
Union victory * Dissolution of the Confederate States * U.S. territorial integrity preserved * Slavery abolished * Beginning of the Reconstruction Era BELLIGERENTS United States
United States
Confederate States COMMANDERS AND LEADERSABRAHAM LINCOLN † Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman
William T. Sherman
David Farragut
David Farragut
George B. McClellan
George B. McClellan
Henry Halleck George Meade and others JEFFERSON DAVIS Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
J.E. Johnston P. G. T. Beauregard
P. G. T. Beauregard
A.S
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Henry H. Rogers
HENRY HUTTLESTON ROGERS BORN (1840-01-29)January 29, 1840 Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Fairhaven, Massachusetts
DIED May 19, 1909(1909-05-19) (aged 69) New York City
New York City
SPOUSE(S) Abigail Palmer Gifford Emelie Augusta Randel Hart CHILDREN * Anne Engle Benjamin * Cara Leland Broughton * Millicent Gifford Rogers * Mary "Mai" Huttleston Coe * Henry Huttleston Rogers, Jr.HENRY HUTTLESTON ROGERS (January 29, 1840 – May 19, 1909) was an American Industrialist and financier . A descendant of the original Mayflower
Mayflower
pilgrims , he made his fortune in the oil refining business, becoming a leader at Standard Oil
Standard Oil
. He played a major role in numerous corporations and business enterprises, in the gas industry, copper, and railroads
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Napoleon Bonaparte
NAPOLéON BONAPARTE (/nəˈpoʊliən ˈboʊnəpɑːrt/ ; French: ; 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French military and political leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution
French Revolution
and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars
French Revolutionary Wars
. As NAPOLEON I, he was Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 (during the Hundred Days ). Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815
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French Revolution
The FRENCH REVOLUTION (French : Révolution française ) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
that lasted from 1789 until 1799, and was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire . The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, experienced violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
that rapidly brought many of its principles to Western Europe
Europe
and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution
Revolution
profoundly altered the course of modern history , triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies
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Chautauqua Movement
CHAUTAUQUA (/ʃəˈtɔːkwə/ shə-TAW-kwə ) was an adult education movement in the United States
United States
, highly popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Chautauqua assemblies expanded and spread throughout rural America until the mid-1920s. The Chautauqua brought entertainment and culture for the whole community, with speakers, teachers, musicians, entertainers, preachers, and specialists of the day. Former U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
was quoted as saying that Chautauqua is "the most American thing in America"
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Salon (gathering)
A SALON is a gathering of people under the roof of an inspiring host, held partly to amuse one another and partly to refine the taste and increase the knowledge of the participants through conversation. These gatherings often consciously followed Horace\'s definition of the aims of poetry, "either to please or to educate" ("aut delectare aut prodesse"). Salons, commonly associated with French literary and philosophical movements of the 17th and 18th centuries, were carried on until as recently as the 1940s in urban settings
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