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Ibrahim Hakki2
Abraham
Abraham
(/ˈeɪbrəˌhæm, -həm/; Hebrew: אַבְרָהָם‬, Modern ʾAvraham, Tiberian ʾAḇrāhām; Arabic: إبراهيم Ibrahim), originally Abram (Hebrew: אַבְרָם‬, Modern ʾAvram, Tiberian ʾAḇrām), is the common patriarch of the three Abrahamic religions.[1] In Judaism
Judaism
he is the founding father of the Covenant, the special relationship between the Jewish people and God; in Christianity, he is the prototype of all believers, Jewish or Gentile; and in Islam
Islam
he is seen as a link in the chain of prophets that begins with Adam
Adam
and culminates in Muhammad.[2] The narrative in Genesis revolves around the themes of posterity and land
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Abraham In Islam
Ibrahim (Arabic: إِبْـرَاهِـيْـم‎, translit. ʾIbrāhīm, pronounced [ʔɪbraːˈhiːm]), known as Abraham
Abraham
in the Hebrew Bible, is recognized as a prophet and messenger in Islam[1][2] of God. Abraham
Abraham
plays a prominent role as an example of faith in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In Muslim belief, Abraham
Abraham
fulfilled all the commandments and trials wherein God nurtured him throughout his lifetime
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The Exodus
The Exodus[a] is the founding myth of Israel, telling how the Israelites
Israelites
were delivered from slavery by their god Yahweh
Yahweh
and therefore belong to him through the Mosaic covenant.[1][b] Spread over the books of Exodus, Leviticus
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Modern Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
or Israeli Hebrew (עברית חדשה‎, ʿivrít ḥadašá[h], [ivˈrit xadaˈʃa] – "Modern Hebrew" or "New Hebrew"), generally referred to by speakers simply as Hebrew (עברית‎ Ivrit), is the standard form of the Hebrew language spoken today. Spoken in ancient times, Hebrew, a member of the Canaanite branch of the Semitic language family, was supplanted as the Jewish vernacular by the western dialect of Aramaic
Aramaic
beginning in the third century BCE, though it continued to be used as a liturgical and literary language
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Tiberian Vocalization
The Tiberian vocalization, Tiberian pointing, or Tiberian niqqud (Hebrew: נִיקוּד טְבֵרִיָנִי‬ Nikkud Tveriyani) is a system of diacritics (niqqud) devised by the Masoretes of Tiberias to add to the consonantal text of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
to produce the Masoretic Text.[1] The system soon became used to vocalize other Hebrew texts as well. The Tiberian vocalization
Tiberian vocalization
marks vowels and stress, makes fine distinctions of consonant quality and length, and serves as punctuation. While the Tiberian system was devised for Tiberian Hebrew, it has become the dominant system for vocalizing all forms of Hebrew; it has long since eclipsed the Babylonian and Palestinian vocalization systems.Contents1 Consonant diacritics 2 Vowel diacritics 3 Cantillation 4 See also 5 References 6 SourcesConsonant diacritics[edit] The sin dot distinguishes between the two values of ש‬
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Arabic
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Covenant (biblical)
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eA biblical covenant is a religious covenant that is described in the Bible. All Abrahamic religions
Abrahamic religions
consider biblical covenants important. Of the covenants found in the Pentateuch
Pentateuch
or Torah
Torah
or the first five books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, the Noahic Covenant is unique in applying to all humanity, while the other covenants are principally agreements made between God and the biblical Israelites. In the Book
Book
of Jeremiah, verses 31:30–33 predict "a new covenant" that God will establish with "the house of Israel"
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God In Judaism
In Judaism, God
God
is understood to be the absolute one, indivisible, and incomparable being who is the ultimate cause of all existence. Judaism holds that YHWH, the god of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Jacob
and the national god of the Israelites, delivered the Israelites
Israelites
from slavery in Egypt, and gave them the Law of Moses
Moses
at biblical Mount Sinai as described in the Torah. Traditional interpretations of Judaism
Judaism
generally emphasize that God
God
is personal, while some modern interpretations of Judaism emphasize that God
God
is a force or ideal.[1] The name of God
God
used most often in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
is the Tetragrammaton
Tetragrammaton
( YHWH
YHWH
Hebrew: יהוה)
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Muhammad
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3]
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God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
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Canaan (biblical Figure)
Canaan
Canaan
(Hebrew: כְּנַעַן‎ Kənā‘an), according to the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
in the Hebrew Bible, was a son of Ham and grandson of Noah, and was the father of the Canaanites. He was the recipient of the so-called Curse of Ham.Contents1 Descendants of Canaan 2 Curse of Canaan 3 Canaan
Canaan
in Jubilees 4 Etymology 5 References 6 External linksDescendants of Canaan[edit]Locations of Canaan's descendantsAccording to the Table of Nations
Table of Nations
in Genesis 10 (verses 15-19), Canaan was the ancestor of the tribes who originally occupied the ancient Land of Canaan: all the territory from Sidon
Sidon
or Hamath in the north to Gaza in the southwest and Lasha
Lasha
in the southeast. This territory is roughly the areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, western Jordan, and western Syria
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Patriarchal Age
The Patriarchal Age is the era of the three biblical Patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac
Isaac
and Jacob, according to the narratives of Genesis 12–50. (These chapters also contain the history of Joseph, although Joseph is not one of the Covenantal Patriarchs.) It is preceded in the Bible by the Primeval history
Primeval history
and followed by The Exodus.Contents1 Jewish tradition 2 Biblical criticism 3 Early biblical archaeology 4 Modern biblical archaeology 5 See also 6 ReferencesJewish tradition[edit] The Bible contains an intricate pattern of chronologies from the creation of Adam, the first man, to the reigns of the later kings of ancient Israel and Judah. Based on this chronology and the Rabbinic tradition, ancient Jewish sources such as Seder Olam Rabbah
Seder Olam Rabbah
date the birth of Abraham
Abraham
to 1948 AM (c
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Yehud Medinata
Yehud Medinata
Yehud Medinata
( Aramaic
Aramaic
for "the province of Judah"), Yahud Medin'ta,[1] or simply Yehud, was an autonomous province of the Persian Achaemenid Empire, roughly equivalent to the older kingdom of Judah but covering a smaller area, within the satrapy of Eber-Nari. The area of Yehud Medinata
Yehud Medinata
corresponded to the previous Babylonian province of Yehud, which was formed after the fall of the kingdom of Judah to the Neo-Babylonian Empire
Neo-Babylonian Empire
(c.597 after its conquest of the Mediterranean east coast, and again in 585/6 BCE after suppressing an unsuccessful Judean revolt)
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Lot's Wife
In the Bible, Lot's wife
Lot's wife
is a figure first mentioned in Genesis 19. The Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
describes how she became a pillar of salt after she looked back at Sodom. She is not named in the Bible
Bible
but is called "Ado" or "Edith" in some Jewish traditions. She is also referred to in the deuterocanonical books at Wisdom 10:7 and the New Testament
New Testament
at Luke 17:32
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Babylonian Captivity
The Babylonian captivity
Babylonian captivity
or Babylonian exile is the period in Jewish history during which a number of people from the ancient Kingdom of Judah were captives in Babylonia. After the Battle of Carchemish in 605 BCE, Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, besieged Jerusalem, resulting in tribute being paid by King Jehoiakim.[1] Jehoiakim refused to pay tribute in Nebuchadnezzar's fourth year, which led to another siege in Nebuchadnezzar's seventh year, culminating with the death of Jehoiakim
Jehoiakim
and the exile of King Jeconiah, his court and many others; Jeconiah's successor Zedekiah
Zedekiah
and others were exiled in Nebuchadnezzar's eighteenth year; a later deportation occurred in Nebuchadnezzar's twenty-third year
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