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Ian McKay
Falklands WarBattle of Mount Longdon †Awards Victoria CrossIan John McKay, VC (7 May 1953 – 12 June 1982) was a British Army soldier and a posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. Born in Wortley, near Barnsley, South Yorkshire, McKay was platoon sergeant of 4 Platoon, B Company, 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment,[1] during the Falklands War. He was killed during the Battle of Mount Longdon, when the deed described below took place, for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross.Contents1 Citation 2 The medal 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksCitation[edit]During the night of 11th/12th June 1982, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment mounted a silent night attack on an enemy battalion position on Mount Longdon, an important objective in the battle for Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands
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Barnsley
Barnsley
Barnsley
(/ˈbɑːrnzli/, locally [ˈbaːnzlɛ]) is a large town in South Yorkshire, England, located halfway between Leeds
Leeds
and Sheffield. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town centre lies on the west bank of the Dearne Valley. Barnsley
Barnsley
is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, of which Barnsley
Barnsley
is the largest and its administrative centre. At the 2011 Census, Barnsley
Barnsley
had a population of 91,297.[1] Barnsley
Barnsley
is a former industrial town centred on linen in its former years and coal mining and glassmaking.[2] The industries declined in the 20th century. Barnsley's culture is rooted in its industrial heritage and it has a tradition of brass bands, originally created as social clubs by its mining communities
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Posthumous Recognition
A list of orders, medals, prizes, and other awards, of military, civil and ecclesiastical conferees. For science and technology awards, see List of science and technology awards.Contents1 Business and management 2 Entertainment2.1 General 2.2 Advertising 2.3 National pageants 2.4 Comic books and cartooning 2.5 Computers and the Internet 2.6 Dance 2.7 Film 2.8 Food and drink 2.9 Humor 2.10 Music 2.11 Radio 2.12 Stage and theater 2.13 Television 2.14 Tourism3 Food3.1 Culinary 3.2 Spirits3.2.1 Brewed 3.2.2 Distillations 3.2.3 Vintner and sommelier4 Games and sports4.1 General and miscellaneous 4.2 American football and Canadian football 4.3 Association football 4.4 Australian rules football 4.5 Auto racing 4.6 Baseball 4.7 Basketball 4.8 Beach soccer 4.9 Board games 4.10 Boxing 4.11 Chess 4.12 Cricket 4.13 Cycling 4.14 Figure skating 4.15 Ice hockey4.15.1 North America 4.15.2 Sweden4.16 Lacrosse 4.17 Olympic medalists 4
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The London Gazette
The London Gazette
The London Gazette
is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette
The London Gazette
claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford
Oxford
Gazette.[note 1][2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury (1712) and Berrow's Worcester Journal (1690), because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage
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Docudrama
A docudrama (or documentary drama) is a genre of radio and television programming, feature film, and staged theatre, which features dramatized re-enactments of actual events. On stage, it is sometimes known as documentary theatre. In the core elements of its story a docudrama strives to adhere to known historical facts, while allowing a greater or lesser degree of dramatic license in peripheral details, and where there are gaps in the historical record. Dialogue
Dialogue
may include the actual words of real-life persons, as recorded in historical documents
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RAF Mount Pleasant
RAF Mount Pleasant
RAF Mount Pleasant
(IATA: MPN, ICAO: EGYP) (also known as Mount Pleasant Airport, Mount Pleasant Complex or MPA)[2] is a Royal Air Force station in the British Overseas Territory
British Overseas Territory
of the Falkland Islands. The airfield goes by the motto of "Defend the right"[3] (while the motto of the islands is "Desire the right") and is part of the British Forces South Atlantic Islands
British Forces South Atlantic Islands
(BFSAI). Home to between 1,000 and 2,000 British military personnel, it is located about 33 miles (53 km) southwest of Stanley,[4] the capital of the Falklands—on the island of East Falkland
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Rotherham
Rotherham
Rotherham
/ˈrɒðrəm, -ðərəm/ ( listen)[1] is a large town in South Yorkshire, England, which together with its conurbation and outlying settlements to the north, south and south-east forms the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham, with a recorded population of 257,280 in the 2011 census. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, its central area is on the banks of the River Don below its confluence with the Rother
Rother
on the traditional road between Sheffield and Doncaster. Rotherham
Rotherham
is today the largest town in a contiguous area with Sheffield, informally known as the Sheffield
Sheffield
Urban Area and is as such an economic centre for many of Sheffield's suburbs — Sheffield
Sheffield
City Centre is 5.6 miles (9.0 km) from Rotherham
Rotherham
town centre
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Imperial War Museum
Imperial War Museums
Imperial War Museums
(IWM) is a British national museum organisation with branches at five locations in England, three of which are in London. Founded as the Imperial War Museum
Imperial War Museum
in 1917, the museum was intended to record the civil and military war effort and sacrifice of Britain and its Empire during the First World War. The museum's remit has since expanded to include all conflicts in which British or Commonwealth forces have been involved since 1914. As of 2012, the museum aims "to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and 'wartime experience'."[2] Originally housed in the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, the museum opened to the public in 1920
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Stanley, Falkland Islands
Stanley (/ˈstænli/; also known as Port Stanley) is the capital of the Falkland Islands. It is located on the island of East Falkland, on a north-facing slope in one of the wettest parts of the islands
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Company (military Unit)
A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 80–150 soldiers and usually commanded by a major or a captain. Most companies are formed of three to six platoons, although the exact number may vary by country, unit type, and structure. Usually several companies are grouped as a battalion or regiment, the latter of which is sometimes formed by several battalions. Occasionally, independent or separate companies are organized for special purposes, such as the 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company
Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company
or the 3rd Force Reconnaissance Company
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Platoon
A platoon is a military unit typically composed of two or more squads/sections/patrols. Platoon
Platoon
organization varies depending on the country and the branch, but typically, per the official tables of organization as published in U.S. military documents; a full-strength U.S. infantry rifle platoon consists of 39 Soldiers or 43 Marines (U.S. Army [USA] or U.S. Marine Corps
Corps
[USMC], respectively). There are other types of infantry platoons (e.g., antiarmor, heavy machinegun, light armored reconnaissance, mortar, reconnaissance, scout, scout sniper, and weapons), depending upon service and type of infantry company/battalion to which the platoon is assigned, and these platoons may range from as few as 18 (USMC scout sniper platoon) to 69 (USMC mortar platoon)
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Platoon Sergeant
In many militaries, a platoon sergeant is the senior enlisted member of a platoon, who advises and supports the platoon's commanding officer in leading the unit.Contents1 Singapore 2 United States2.1 U.S. Army 2.2 U.S. Marine Corps3 See also 4 ReferencesSingapore[edit] In the Singapore Armed Forces, a platoon sergeant serves as the "bridge" between the platoon commander and the rest of the platoon, leading the platoon in many assigned tasks and assuming command in the platoon commander's absence. In some platoons, there may be more than one platoon sergeant. Platoon
Platoon
sergeants exercise authority over section commanders who are only responsible for the management of a given section in the platoon. Platoon
Platoon
sergeants work with the Company Sergeant Major
Company Sergeant Major
and subordinate section commanders. They are responsible for the discipline and training of the men
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Commonwealth Of Nations
The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
of Nations[2] (formerly the British Commonwealth),[3][1] also known as simply the Commonwealth, is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.[4] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
operates by intergovernmental consensus of the member states, organised through the Commonwealth Secretariat and non-governmental organisations, organised through the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
Foundation.[5] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
dates back to the mid-20th century with the decolonisation of the British Empire
British Empire
through increased self-governance of its territories
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Victoria Cross
The Victoria Cross
Victoria Cross
(VC) is the highest award of the United Kingdom honours system. It is awarded for gallantry "in the presence of the enemy" to members of the British armed forces. It may be awarded posthumously. It was previously awarded to Commonwealth countries, most of which have established their own honours systems and no longer recommend British honours. It may be awarded to a person of any military rank in any service and to civilians under military command although no civilian has received the award since 1879. Since the first awards were presented by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in 1857, two thirds of all awards have been personally presented by the British monarch. These investitures are usually held at Buckingham Palace. The VC was introduced on 29 January 1856 by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War
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Killed In Action
Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces.[1] The United States
United States
Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. KIAs do not come from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes and other "non-hostile" events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events. Further, KIA denotes one to have been killed in action on the battlefield whereas died of wounds (DOW) relates to someone who survived to reach a medical treatment facility
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