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I Wish You A Merry Christmas
I Wish You a Merry Christmas
I Wish You a Merry Christmas
was a long-playing vinyl album of Christmas themed songs recorded by Bing Crosby
Bing Crosby
for his own company, Project Records, and issued by Warner Bros. (W-1484) in 1962. The tracks were arranged by Bob Thompson, Peter Matz and Jack Halloran and each conducted the orchestra for their own arrangements. The musical accompaniment was recorded on 23 and 25 July 1962 and Crosby over-dubbed his vocals on October 5, 1962.[1] The album was re-released by Capitol in 1977 (on LP) and again in 1988 (on CD) as Bing Crosby's Christmas Classics, with one track – "Pat-a-Pan/ While Shepherds Watched Their Sheep" – omitted
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Sammy Cahn
Sammy Cahn
Sammy Cahn
(June 18, 1913 – January 15, 1993) was an American lyricist, songwriter and musician. He is best known for his romantic lyrics to films and Broadway songs, as well as stand-alone songs premiered by recording companies in the Greater Los Angeles Area. He and his collaborators had a series of hit recordings with Frank Sinatra during the singer's tenure at Capitol Records, but also enjoyed hits with Dean Martin, Doris Day
Doris Day
and many others. He played the piano and violin
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What Child Is This?
"What Child Is This?" is a Christmas carol
Christmas carol
whose lyrics were written by William Chatterton Dix, in 1865. At the time of composing the carol, Dix worked as an insurance company manager and had been struck by a severe illness. While recovering, he underwent a spiritual renewal that led him to write several hymns, including lyrics to this carol that was subsequently set to the tune of "Greensleeves", a traditional English folk song
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The Holly And The Ivy
"The Holly and the Ivy" is a traditional British folk Christmas carol. The song is catalogued as Roud Folk Song Index
Roud Folk Song Index
No
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Harry Simeone
Harry Moses Simeone (May 9, 1910 – February 22, 2005) was an American music arranger, conductor and composer, best known for arranging the famous Christmas
Christmas
song "The Little Drummer Boy", for which he received co-writing credit.Contents1 Early years 2 Initial prominence 3 "The Little Drummer Boy" 4 Final years 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly years[edit] Simeone was born in Newark, New Jersey. He grew up listening to stars performing at the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
in New York City, not far from his native Newark. Initiated and inspired by this childhood passion, he sought a career as a concert pianist
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O Holy Night
"O Holy Night" (French: "Minuit Chretiens!" or "Cantique de Noël") is a well-known Christmas carol
Christmas carol
composed by Adolphe Adam
Adolphe Adam
in 1847 to the French poem "Minuit, chrétiens" (Midnight, Christians) written by a wine merchant and poet, Placide Cappeau
Placide Cappeau
(1808–1877). In both the French original and the two familiar English versions of the carol, as well as many other languages, the text reflects on the birth of Jesus and on humanity's redemption.Contents1 History 2 Lyrics 3 Recordings 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] In Roquemaure at the end of 1843, the church organ had recently been renovated. To celebrate the event, the parish priest asked Cappeau, a native of the town, to write a Christmas
Christmas
poem, even though the latter had never showed any interest in religion, and Cappeau obliged.[1] Soon afterwards, Adam wrote the music
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Mack David
Mack David (July 5, 1912 – December 30, 1993) was an American lyricist and songwriter, best known for his work in film and television, with a career spanning the period between the early 1940s and the early 1970s
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Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!
"Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!", also known as "Let It Snow", is a song written by lyricist Sammy Cahn
Sammy Cahn
and composer Jule Styne in July 1945. It was written in Hollywood, California
Hollywood, California
during a heat wave as Cahn and Styne imagined cooler conditions.[1] Although the song's lyrics make no mention of Christmas, it is played on radio stations during the Christmas season and is often covered by various artists on Christmas-themed albums. In the Southern Hemisphere, however, it can be played during winter (June, July, August) and in New Zealand, some play it at Matariki. Recording history[edit]This article is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. You can help by converting this article to prose, if appropriate. Editing help is available
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Jule Styne
Jule Styne (/ˈdʒuːli staɪn/;[1] December 31, 1905 - September 20, 1994) was a British-American song writer and composer known for a series of Broadway musicals, which include several famous and frequently revived shows.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Songs4.1 Credits5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Styne was born to a Jewish
Jewish
family[2] in London, England as Julius Kerwin Stein to immigrants from Ukraine, the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
who ran a small grocery. At the age of eight, he moved with his family to Chicago, where at an early age he began taking piano lessons. He proved to be a prodigy and performed with the Chicago, St
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Hugh Martin
Hugh Martin (August 11, 1914 – March 11, 2011) was an American musical theater and film composer, arranger, vocal coach, and playwright. He was best known for his score for the 1944 MGM
MGM
musical Meet Me In St
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Hark! The Herald Angels Sing
"Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" is a Christmas carol
Christmas carol
that first appeared in 1739 in the collection Hymns and Sacred Poems. Its lyrics had been written by Charles Wesley. Wesley had requested and received slow and solemn music for his lyrics, not the joyful tune expected today. Moreover, Wesley's original opening couplet is "Hark! how all the welkin rings / Glory to the King of Kings".[1] The popular version is the result of alterations by various hands, notably by Wesley's co-worker George Whitefield
George Whitefield
who changed the opening couplet to the familiar one, and by Felix Mendelssohn, whose melody was used for the lyrics. In 1840—a hundred years after the publication of Hymns and Sacred Poems—Mendelssohn composed a cantata to commemorate Johann Gutenberg's invention of movable type printing, and it is music from this cantata, adapted by the English musician William H. Cummings
William H

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It Came Upon The Midnight Clear
"It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" (1849) – sometimes rendered as "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear" – is a poem and Christmas
Christmas
carol written by Edmund Sears, pastor of the Unitarian Church in Wayland, Massachusetts. Sears' lyrics are most commonly set to one of two melodies: "Carol," composed by Richard Storrs Willis, or "Noel," adapted by Arthur Sullivan
Arthur Sullivan
from an English melody.Contents1 History 2 Melody 3 Lyrics 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Edmund Sears composed the five-stanza poem in Common Metre Doubled during 1849. It first appeared on December 29, 1849, in the Christian Register in Boston.[1] Sears served the Unitarian congregation in Wayland, Massachusetts, before moving on to a larger congregation in Lancaster
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Steve Nelson (songwriter)
Steve Edward Nelson (November 24, 1907 – November 13, 1981) was an American songwriter.[1] Born in New York City, Nelson worked for Tin Pan Alley
Tin Pan Alley
starting there in 1929. He later wrote country songs for artists such as Eddy Arnold and Guy Lombardo. In 1950, probably his best known composition, "Frosty the Snowman" was released, co-written with Jack Rollins.[2][3] In 1952, Nelson co-wrote, again with Rollins, the song which was used for the safety campaign of Smokey Bear.[4] References[edit]^ Nashville Songwriters: Hall of Fame ^ "Steve Nelson". www.discogs.com. Retrieved 27 December 2014.  ^ William E Studwell; Frank Hoffmann; B Lee Cooper (12 October 2012). The Christmas Carol Reader. Routledge. pp. 194–. ISBN 978-1-136-59145-7.  ^ "Smokey's name". www.smokeybear.com
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Walter E. Rollins
Walter E. "Jack" Rollins (September 15, 1906 – January 1, 1973) was an American musician of Keyser, West Virginia. Along with Steve Nelson, he co-wrote "Here Comes Peter Cottontail," used in the Easter special of the same name, in 1949, and "Frosty the Snowman" in 1950. Jack Rollins also wrote "Smokey the Bear" for the public-service mascot Smokey Bear, and co-wrote many country songs for artists such as Gene Autry, Hank Snow, George Jones
George Jones
and Eddy Arnold.[1] Rollins died on January 1, 1973, and is buried in Queens Point Memorial Cemetery in Keyser. References[edit]^ "Tracing Frosty's W.Va. connection". wvgazettemail.com. Retrieved April 13, 2017. External links[edit]Biography portal Walter E. Rollins
Walter E

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Patapan
"Patapan" (or "Pat-a-pan") is a French Christmas carol in Burgundian dialect, later adapted into English. It was written by Bernard de La Monnoye (1641–1728) and first published in Noël bourguignons in 1720.[1] Its original title is "Guillô, Pran Ton Tamborin" ("Willie, Bring Your Little Drum" or "Willie, Take Your Little Drum"). The carol revolves around the birth of Jesus Christ, and is told from the perspective of shepherds playing simple instruments—flutes and drums—the onomatopoetic sound of which gives the song its name; "patapan" is meant to mimic the sound of the drum, and an accompanying lyric, "tu-re-lu-re-lu," the flute
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